England go 1 game up in 3 game Commonwealth Bank Series final


Blackleaf
#1


Cricket: England go 1 up in the best-of-three game Commonwealth Bank Series final against Australia.



Collingwood breathes new life into England

By Simon Briggs in Melbourne
09/02/2007


"Alleluia! England finally won a proper cricket match against Australia - and no cribbing that it wasn't the full team."

England: 253/6

Australia: 252

England win by 4 wickets
---------------------
England are 1-0 up in the 3-game Final.

English cricket has been the subject of countless obituaries, but somehow the patient never seems to lie down. After yesterday's stunning win in Melbourne, England look as if they might leave Australia with a trophy – something they have not managed since 1987.


Mission accomplished: Paul Collingwood celebrates victory

On a steamy night at the MCG, Paul Collingwood produced the performance of his life to carry England home by four wickets. It was an extraordinary effort, because Australia had been utterly dominant for the first 30 overs of the match. But England have shown an unquenchable spirit over the last week.

Their sheer resilience has been a wonder to behold, and could yet supply a triumphant twist to this harrowing tour.

The Test series may not have lived up to expectations, but yesterday's match came as close as any one-day international can to matching the stomach-turning swoops and lurches of the 2005 Ashes. At 170 for one, with Ricky Ponting on the verge of another virtuoso hundred, Australia looked to have a 300-run total in their sights. But that was until Collingwood knocked this over-familiar record out of its groove, accounting for Ponting with a blinding one-handed catch at cover.

When Matthew Hayden holed out at long-on, England were suddenly into the middle order, which is not so imposing in the absence of Andrew Symonds. Wickets just kept falling, two of them courtesy of Collingwood's dead-eyed throws at the stumps. As the ball softened, the boundaries dried up, but the breakthroughs kept coming. Andrew Flintoff, in particular, was irresistible in a second spell of 4.3-1-22-3. He ripped a perfect yorker through Glenn McGrath's defences, finishing Australia off with nine balls unused.

Even after England's comeback, which closed with a sequence of four wickets for as many runs, Australia were still favourites to defend a target of 253. The pitch had two paces – very slow and positively somnolent – and after a couple of dicey lbw decisions and an early miscue from Ed Joyce, the scoreboard showed a sickly-looking 15 for three. A few overs later, McGrath had a chance to apply the coup de grace when Ian Bell pulled one straight to him at long-leg, but he shelled one of the easiest catches of his career.

On his 37th birthday, McGrath never fully regained his poise, handing England bonus runs with a series of fielding errors. He remains a threat with the ball, but his lack of foot speed and increasing fallibility as a catcher put him out of synch with his team.

Bell and Collingwood set about repairing the early damage. Their stand of 133 in 144 balls was rarely spectacular, containing just 30 runs in boundaries, but they ran well, manoeuvred the ball smartly, and kept chipping away at the target. By the time Brett Lee winkled Bell out with a 95mph yorker, the game was in the balance.

Collingwood now took control of the chase, masterminding stands of 74 with Flintoff and 28 (unbroken) with Paul Nixon. The only time the run-rate seemed to be getting away from him was with three overs to go, when England still needed 25. But he responded with consecutive boundaries from the next two balls, going down on one knee to scoop Shane Watson twice over fine-leg.

It was not a great night for Watson. Ponting took a gamble in entrusting him with that critical over, when he might have been better off using Nathan Bracken, and it played into England's hands.

Collingwood, fittingly, flicked the winning run through midwicket. He finished unbeaten on 120, his second century in consecutive games, and now looks unrecognisable from the figure who cobbled together 132 runs from nine innings during the month of January.

Perhaps it was Shane Warne's incessant sledging that got to him, or just the fall-out from a dismal Ashes campaign. Whatever the explanation, he has turned things around in style.

"In all my time playing one-day cricket for England that is the best innings I have seen," Flintoff said. "The way he paced it, his stamina, and his concentration were a lesson for everyone watching. It was fantastic to see Paul playing like that."

Collingwood was at a loss to explain his change in form. "The only noticeable thing I have done different is change my bat handle to a pink one," he said. "It is amazing once you have a bit of luck in the middle how it can get you back into form."

After all the flak they have taken, Andrew Flintoff and co now find themselves leading this best-of-three finals series 1-0. If they can manage just one more victory, they will carry off the Commonwealth Bank Series trophy, while also puncturing Australia's infuriating air of self-satisfaction.

All in all, it was not a bad night for the outfit dubbed the worst team ever to leave England.
-----------------


England (253-6) beat Australia (252) by four wickets

Paul Collingwood's second consecutive hundred led England to victory over Australia in the first Commonwealth Bank Series final
------------

Collingwood, 30, hit an unbeaten 120, his highest score in one-day internationals, to guide his side to a four-wicket win at the Melbourne Cricket Ground.

Fittingly, he finished things when he struck Nathan Bracken through midwicket for a single in the final over of the match
----------

A late stutter threatened to harm England's bid but, with 25 needed from the final three overs, Collingwood took responsibility.

Twice in as many balls he hit boundaries to the legside off Shane Watson to alter the balance
-----------

England initially lost three wickets inside the first half-a-dozen overs to heavily jeopardise their chances.

Openers Mal Loye and Ed Joyce succumbed to paceman Brett Lee - the former the victim of a poor leg-before decision by Australian umpire Daryl Harper - while Andrew Strauss was pinned lbw by Bracken after playing around his front pad
---------------------

At first intent on containing the damage, the fourth-wicket pair upped the tempo impressively. From a position of 41 for three after 15 overs, they launched 48 from the next six.

Collingwood, whose hundred against New Zealand earlier this week was integral to getting to the finals, hoisted McGrath for a huge six during that period

-------------

When Lee produced a yorker to knock back Bell's off stump Australia had a chance. They relinquished it, however, when a double error allowed lives for both Collingwood and Andrew Flintoff from the same piece of play.

Collingwood turned to the legside off McGrath and came back for two, but rather than take the bails off from Michael Hussey's throw, wicketkeeper Adam Gilchrist relayed to the bowler's end where a combination of McGrath and Lee (pictured) missed the opportunity
------------------

Flintoff was also put down before he added another run by substitute Mitchell Johnson at extra cover off the bowling of spinner Brad Hogg.

Just as the game appeared in the bag, however, Flintoff - whose only boundary in an innings of 35 was a six off Hogg - feathered a catch behind off Shane Watson (pictured).
------------------

When Jamie Dalrymple was sacrificed in the following over, run out trying to steal a single to point, 28 were still required from 23 deliveries, but thanks to Collingwood England made it to the finishing line
----------------

Earlier, England produced an outstanding riposte in the field to dismiss the Australians for 252.

The home country appeared poised to post a huge total as they entered the final 20 overs of the innings on 170 with nine wickets intact
------------------

However, a stunning catch from Collingwood ended Ricky Ponting's run-a-ball 75 and triggered a fall of nine wickets inside 19 overs.

Collingwood also effected two run-outs to cap a fine day in the field personally
----------------------

Stolen singles were a feature of the 138-run stand for the second wicket, but Ponting and Matthew Hayden should have been parted in the 29th over.

Ponting pushed into the offside off Monty Panesar and his initial call committed Hayden to a run.

Dalrymple seized on the ball but a poor under-arm return and clumsiness from Panesar, who demolished the stumps at the bowler's end, saw the opportunity wasted
------------------

Ultimately England got away with it, however, as, in Panesar's next over, Ponting cracked a cut to short cover, where Collingwood clung on low to his left.

Hayden followed soon afterwards to off-spinner Dalrymple for 82, after towering a catch to long on, and England made light of being without the injured Michael Vaughan as the final six Aussie wickets fell for 33


Australia Line Up

George Hogg
Brett Lee
Bradley Hodge
Ricky Ponting
Nathan Bracken
Michael Hussey
Michael Clarke
Adam Gilchrist
Glenn McGrath
Matthew Hayden
Shane Watson
----------------------------------

England Line Up

Ed Joyce
Andrew Strauss
Liam Plunkett
Mal Loye
James Dalrymple
Paul Nixon
Ian Bell
Andrew Flintoff
Paul Collingwood
Sajid Mahmood
Monty Panesar


telegraph.co.uk
Last edited by Blackleaf; Feb 10th, 2007 at 06:06 AM..
 
Blackleaf
#2
ENGLAND CELEBRATE AS THEY WIN THE 2007 COMMONWEALTH BANK SERIES


England claim series


By Simon Briggs in Sydney

11/02/2007


England 246-8
Australia 152-8


England win by 34 runs (according to the Duckworth-Lewis Method)


(Even though England amassed a total of 246, Australia only required 211 to win as the Duckworth-Lewis Method was brought into play due to several interruptions because of bad weather)

They now have an unassailable 2-0 lead in the best-of-three Final
-----------------------------------------------------


England's long and arduous tour ended on a high note when they claimed the Commonwealth Bank Series trophy with a comprehensive win in Sydney.


Triumph: England players are jubilant as they beat Australia in the Final



Paul Collingwood claimed his third successive man-of-the-match award in a victory that was nearly thwarted by a series of heavy showers rolling in from the ocean.

The Duckworth-Lewis method had to be invoked several times, and in the end the weather terminated Australia's chase with 59 runs needed from 36 balls, and two wickets still to fall.

England were adjudged victors by 34 runs. England's late run of success has totally transformed the final month of this tour, which appeared to be coming off the rails when they were bowled out for successive scores of 120 and 110 in Adelaide.

Now they have won three consecutive games against Australia in Australia – a feat they have not managed for 27 years.

The capture of the trophy has suddenly installed England as World Cup 2007 dark horses, while the home side are looking increasingly vulnerable without the all-round skills of Andrew Symonds.

England won an important toss, and though their batsmen never really cut loose, they kept their heads and managed to see out the 50 overs.

Mal Loye provided some early momentum with a spirited if unorthodox innings of 45, featuring at least half-a-dozen instances of his favourite slog-sweep shot. But the meat in the middle of the innings was provided by a 97-run stand between Collingwood and Andrew Flintoff.

Both men accepted the difficulty of hitting boundaries on a slow pitch, preferring to work the ball around, and Collingwood's 70 from 90 balls was a masterpiece of wristy placement.

Chasing 247 to win (before the D/L Method), Australia started off with their usual positive intent, as Adam Gilchrist carried them to 25 for none after three overs. But then England claimed two crucial wickets in the space of seven balls. First Mathew Hayden crashed a drive into the hands of Collingwood, fielding at short cover, and then Ricky Ponting edged to slip.

A rain-break interrupted Gilchrist's rhythm, and he was cleaned up first ball after the break by a superb Liam Plunkett inswinger that crashed into the top of his off-stump. England were flying, but there was still an alarming moment when the rain returned with Australia on 79 for five, bringing the players off 22 balls short of the 20 overs that are required to constitute a match.

Flintoff had to remonstrate with the groundstaff to bring the covers on quickly, and then looked on in alarm when the umpires appeared reluctant to restart the game. But in the end there was plenty of time to complete the job.

The highlight of the final section of the match was a brilliant diving catch by Jamie Dalrymple, who accounted for Shane Watson just when he was starting to look dangerous.


England win one-day series final

England (246-8 ) beat Australia (152-8 ) by 34 runs by the D/L Method

England completed one of the great sporting comebacks to claim the Commonwealth Bank Series at the Sydney Cricket Ground
---------------------


Andrew Flintoff's team beat Australia by 34 runs by the Duckworth-Lewis method in a rain-affected affair to take the finals 2-0, having come back from the dead to qualify for the best-of-three showdown
---------------


THWACK! - Paul Collingwood was the man of the finals, extending his awesome batting form by hitting 70 to hold the England innings together
-----------------


Earlier, Mal Loye fought his way to a career-best score of 45, passing his previous high of 36 with a signature slog sweep for six off veteran paceman Glenn McGrath
-------------


Australia, the world champions started their pursuit of 247 from a full complement of 50 overs but Sajid Mahmood (pictured) began the slump when a slower ball was slapped to Paul Collingwood to short cover by Matthew Hayden
-------------


Liam Plunkett then plunged Australia into crisis by removing prize trio Ricky Ponting, Adam Gilchrist and Michael Clarke
------------


And Andrew Flintoff terminated Michael Hussey's 10-ball stay at the crease with one that angled across the left-hander for Andrew Strauss to claim his second catch
-------------


Australia went back out after rain stopped play on 79 for five but lost Shane Watson to a brilliant one-handed catch by Jamie Dalrymple, off the bowling of Collingwood, to end realistic hopes of a challenge
-------------------


CHAMPIOOOONS!! - There were jubilant scenes at the end as England finally gave their long-suffering fans something to cheer about.

England can now approach the World Cup in the West Indies with renewed confidence after the humiliation of the Ashes debacle

Australia

George Hogg
Brett Lee
Bradley Hodge
Ricky Ponting
Nathan Bracken
Michael Hussey
Michael Clarke
Adam Gilchrist
Glenn McGrath
Matthew Hayden
Shane Watson
----------------------------------

England

Ed Joyce
Andrew Strauss
Liam Plunkett
Mal Loye
James Dalrymple
Paul Nixon
Ian Bell
Andrew Flintoff
Paul Collingwood
Sajid Mahmood
Monty Panesar



telegraph.co.uk
Last edited by Blackleaf; Feb 11th, 2007 at 01:18 PM..
 
Blackleaf
#3
WHAT IS THE DUCKWORTH-LEWIS METHOD?


Rain interrupted play in the Final of the Commonwealth Bank Series between Australia and England. Therefore, the Duckworth-Lewis Method had to be brought into play. This meant that Australia needed just 211 runs to win even though England amassed a total of 246 - which does seem to be a bit unfair. Australia, though, could only score 152.


But how does it work?


In the sport of cricket , the Duckworth-Lewis method (D/L method) is a way to calculate the target score for the team batting second in a one-day cricket match interrupted by weather or other circumstance. It is generally accepted to be a fair and accurate method of setting a target score, but as it attempts to predict what would have happened had the game come to its natural conclusion, it generates some controversy.

The D/L method was devised by two statisticians , Frank Duckworth and Tony Lewis , and has been adopted by the International Cricket Council as the standard method of calculating target scores in shortened one-day matches.

Previous methods used to achieve the same task included the use of run-rate ratios, the use of the score that the first team had achieved at the same point in their innings , and the use of targets derived by totaling the best scoring overs in the initial innings.

All of these methods have flaws that are easily exploitable. Run-rate ratios do not account for how many wickets the team batting second have lost, but simply reflect how quickly they were scoring at the point the match was interrupted. Thus if a team felt a rain stoppage was likely, they could attempt to force the scoring rate without regard for the corresponding highly likely loss of wickets, skewing the comparison with the first team. The best-scoring overs method, used in the 1992 Cricket World Cup , left the South African cricket team requiring 22 runs from one ball – where the maximum score from any one ball is six runs – without considering that their batting, on the whole, had been superior to their opponents in several measurable ways, a position widely felt to be very unfair. These flaws are not present, or at least effectively normalized, by the D/L method.

Application

The D/L method is relatively simple to apply, but requires a published reference table and some simple mathematical calculation (or use of a computer). As with most non-trivial statistical derivations, however, the D/L method can produce results that are somewhat counterintuitive, and the announcement of the derived target score can provoke a good deal of second-guessing and discussion amongst the crowd at the cricket ground. This can also be seen as one of the method's successes, adding interest to a "slow" rain-affected day of play.



Theory

The essence of the D/L method is "resources". Each team is taken to have two "resources" to use to make as many runs as possible: the number of overs they have to receive; and the number of wickets they have in hand. At any point in any innings , a team's ability to score more runs depends on the combination of these two resources. Looking at historical scores, there is a very close correspondence between the availability of these resources and a team's final score, a correspondence which D/L exploits.

Using a published table which gives the percentage of these combined resources remaining for any number of overs (or, more accurately, balls) left and wickets lost, the target score can be adjusted up or down to reflect the loss of resources to one or both teams when a match is shortened one or more times. This percentage is then used to calculate a target (sometimes called a "par score") that is usually a fractional number of runs, which is then rounded down. If the second team passes the target then the second team is taken to have won the match; if the match ends when the second team has exactly met (but not passed) the target then the match is taken to be a tie .

wikipedia.org
************************************************** *****



Australia captain Ricky Ponting

Australia captain Ricky Ponting paid tribute to England's resolve after their shock one-day series victory.


"They had their backs to the wall but can go home with a big smile on their faces for some terrific one-day cricket in the last couple of weeks," he said.

"They should all be very proud of the way they have been able to turn things around so congratulations to England.

"We've let everybody down in the last couple of games, we've got work to do but we look forward to the World Cup."



Ponting is to be given time off to rest a troublesome back before the World Cup begins in the Caribbean in March.

But the rest of the team will travel to New Zealand to begin a three-match series next weekend.

However, after playing non-stop since September, with 20 one-day internationals and five Ashes Tests, he refused to blame fatigue for their recent lapses.

"It's the end of a long summer and I know some of the guys are feeling it physically," he added.

"But it's been our skills and our decision-making that has let us down over the last couple of days - that's the disappointing thing. "I don't think it's the time to panic. We'll pick a very strong squad of 15 players for the World Cup."

----------------------------------

More pics


England elect to bat first in the second of the best-of-three CB Series finals and Ed Joyce is soon finding the boundary
----------------------------------


Glenn McGrath removes Joyce in the ninth over as England strive to repeat their win in the first final in Melbourne
----------------------------


The baton passes to Mal Loye, who struggles early on but starts to impress just before rain hits after 15 overs
---------------------------


But from the first ball after the second rain break, Loye is run out by Matthew Hayden after a bright 45
--------------------------------


Out! - Andrew Strauss departs shortly after, providing an edge to Adam Gilchrist behind the stumps and leaving England at 86-3
------------------------------


Ian Bell fails to make his ground as sharp work in the field from Michael Hussey puts the brakes on England's innings
-----------------------------


In his last international at his home ground, McGrath dismisses Paul Nixon with the last ball to leave England at 246-8
--------------------------------


England make early inroads when Collingwood at short mid-off snaps up Matthew Hayden's drive off Sajid Mahmood
------------------------


Liam Plunkett has Australia at 35-2 when he forces an edge from dangerman Ricky Ponting and Strauss holds on at slip
------------------------------------


The Duckworth/Lewis method is brought into play after more rain in Sydney, with Australia's revised target 227 in 41 overs
---------------------------------


The players leave the field for rain again, with Australia on 152-8 (the D/L Method again reduces Australia's target, to 211), and after a short delay England are awarded the game
------------------------------


England enjoy their first overseas one-day tournament win since 1997 and a positive end to a tough tour of Australia
----------------------------

news.bbc.co.uk
Last edited by Blackleaf; Feb 11th, 2007 at 01:36 PM..