To Hell with Quebec


Girth
+4 / -1
#1
Quebec can **** themselves. Seperate you fools. You are a burden to Canada.
 
B00Mer
No Party Affiliation
#2
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t8prHyXfvdU
 
Girth
-1
#3
I'll expand on this later. It's going to be a long post, due to what the Bloc leader said about Alberta
 
taxslave
Free Thinker
+3
#4
Will CC call the frenchies traitors if they leave? What about if we vote them off the island?
 
B00Mer
No Party Affiliation
+1
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by Girth View Post

I'll expand on this later. It's going to be a long post, due to what the Bloc leader said about Alberta


https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calga...chet-1.5358480
 
Girth
-1
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

Will CC call the frenchies traitors if they leave? What about if we vote them off the island?

I wish there was some way of resettling East Coasters into Quebec, and vice versa. Atlantic Canadians are harder workers, friendlier, and less corrupt.
 
pgs
Free Thinker
+3
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by B00Mer View Post

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calga...chet-1.5358480

Read the comments and wonder why so many Albertans favor separation.
 
Serryah
Free Thinker
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by Girth View Post

I wish there was some way of resettling East Coasters into Quebec, and vice versa. Atlantic Canadians are harder workers, friendlier, and less corrupt.


Funny, I've heard people in the west say we on the Atlantic coast are the worst because we go west, take jobs, then move back home. Like how dare we.


*shrug*
 
MHz
+1
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by Serryah View Post

Funny, I've heard people in the west say we on the Atlantic coast are the worst because we go west, take jobs, then move back home. Like how dare we.


*shrug*

If the money is earned in AB yet sent east along with equalization payments why would AB not be justified to have the money sent home and spent there added up so it can be deducted from the transfer payments. Unregulated there could be $4B being moved rather than $2B. I can see whey the east would balk at changing the robbery into something they would accept if the money flow was in the other direction.
 
Girth
+1 / -1
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by Serryah View Post

Funny, I've heard people in the west say we on the Atlantic coast are the worst because we go west, take jobs, then move back home. Like how dare we.
*shrug*

I've been in Alberta for most of the last 15 years and I have never heard that. Where did you hear this, and what approximate date was it that you heard it.

The reason I ask is because we both know you are being less than truthful, and I am seeing what fictitious story you can up with. I am from. Winnipeg and I have never once been told anything remotely close to this. I also worked with many Newfie, and I never heard them complain about being singled out.

Are you sure you are not thinking of Atlanta?
Last edited by Girth; 4 weeks ago at 03:41 PM..
 
Jinentonix
No Party Affiliation
+5
#11  Top Rated Post
Considering Blanchet's shit sucking attitude towards oil, one must wonder if he's going to shut down Quebec's oil refineries or just be yet another, disingenuous, hypocritical douchebag politician from Quebec.
 
Tecumsehsbones
-2
#12
Traitors calling traitors traitors.

Pure comedy gold.
 
Mowich
Conservative
+3
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by Jinentonix View Post

Considering Blanchet's shit sucking attitude towards oil, one must wonder if he's going to shut down Quebec's oil refineries or just be yet another, disingenuous, hypocritical douchebag politician from Quebec.




Separatism 101: On Wednesday Bloc Quebecois leader Yves-Francois Blanchet, took his place in the chair next to Justin Trudeau as the Prime Minister continued his brief chats with opposition leaders ahead of Parliament resuming next month. It was a chill affair, although Blanchet — arguably the recent election’s biggest winner — expressed zero interest in voting against Trudeau’s throne speech and toppling the Liberals.

Ultimately though, Blanchet wants Quebec to split from Canada, so don’t look to him to be “one that will fight to have a nice, beautiful and united Canada,” he said. But that doesn’t mean he’s eager to offer any handy tips to Wexiters who want out of Confederation: “If they were attempting to create a green state in western Canada I might be tempted to help them. If they are trying to create an oil state in western Canada, they cannot expect any help from us.”

Talking tough: Up next in the chair later today is the NDP’s Jagmeet Singh, arguably the election’s biggest loser, who saw the party lose one-third of its seats. So not surprisingly, Singh wouldn’t mind a do-over. “We are absolutely open to voting against the throne speech if it doesn’t include some of the priorities we know Canadians need,” he said, though exactly how the party could undertake another campaign with its finances in such rough shape was a question for another day.

Speak up: When Parliament does get back to work on Dec. 5, the first order of business will be for MPs to elect a Speaker of the House. The guy who held the job before the election is game if MPs will have him back. Halifax Liberal Geoff Regan has put his name in the hat. Or more precisely, he left his name in the hat — all MPs except party leaders and those in cabinet are automatically put on the ballot unless they ask to have their names withdrawn. (For more process nerdity around getting the job of Speaker, here’s process nerd Kady O’Malley.) So far, three other MPs are still in the running: Conservative MP Bruce Stanton, Liberal MP Anthony Rota and NDP MP Carol Hughes.

The foreign influence that mattered: If there’s one thing that turned the election tide back in Trudeau’s favour after the blackface scandal, it was that endorsement tweet from former president Barack Obama, Liberal insiders tell the National Post‘s John Ivison:
“It recharged the base – those people who had been embarrassed by Trudeau’s behaviour (in the ‘blackface’ scandal). Obama gave everyone the re-assurance that Justin was a great guy and not a racist,” said one campaign staff member.

In marketing terms, this was the cognitive dissonance moment, when people who had supported Trudeau, but been confronted with facts contrary to their beliefs, found a way to resolve that contradiction to reduce their discomfort. If someone of Obama’s stature was supportive, it allowed people to feel better about voting for Trudeau.
www.macleans.ca/politics/ottawa/blanchet-to-wexiters-no-separatist-tips-for-you-politics-insider/


Ah..........so it wasn't the Russians we needed to worry about meddling in our election ..............just an ex-American president.
 
pgs
Free Thinker
+1
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by Mowich View Post



Separatism 101: On Wednesday Bloc Quebecois leader Yves-Francois Blanchet, took his place in the chair next to Justin Trudeau as the Prime Minister continued his brief chats with opposition leaders ahead of Parliament resuming next month. It was a chill affair, although Blanchet — arguably the recent election’s biggest winner — expressed zero interest in voting against Trudeau’s throne speech and toppling the Liberals.

Ultimately though, Blanchet wants Quebec to split from Canada, so don’t look to him to be “one that will fight to have a nice, beautiful and united Canada,” he said. But that doesn’t mean he’s eager to offer any handy tips to Wexiters who want out of Confederation: “If they were attempting to create a green state in western Canada I might be tempted to help them. If they are trying to create an oil state in western Canada, they cannot expect any help from us.”

Talking tough: Up next in the chair later today is the NDP’s Jagmeet Singh, arguably the election’s biggest loser, who saw the party lose one-third of its seats. So not surprisingly, Singh wouldn’t mind a do-over. “We are absolutely open to voting against the throne speech if it doesn’t include some of the priorities we know Canadians need,” he said, though exactly how the party could undertake another campaign with its finances in such rough shape was a question for another day.

Speak up: When Parliament does get back to work on Dec. 5, the first order of business will be for MPs to elect a Speaker of the House. The guy who held the job before the election is game if MPs will have him back. Halifax Liberal Geoff Regan has put his name in the hat. Or more precisely, he left his name in the hat — all MPs except party leaders and those in cabinet are automatically put on the ballot unless they ask to have their names withdrawn. (For more process nerdity around getting the job of Speaker, here’s process nerd Kady O’Malley.) So far, three other MPs are still in the running: Conservative MP Bruce Stanton, Liberal MP Anthony Rota and NDP MP Carol Hughes.

The foreign influence that mattered: If there’s one thing that turned the election tide back in Trudeau’s favour after the blackface scandal, it was that endorsement tweet from former president Barack Obama, Liberal insiders tell the National Post‘s John Ivison:
“It recharged the base – those people who had been embarrassed by Trudeau’s behaviour (in the ‘blackface’ scandal). Obama gave everyone the re-assurance that Justin was a great guy and not a racist,” said one campaign staff member.

In marketing terms, this was the cognitive dissonance moment, when people who had supported Trudeau, but been confronted with facts contrary to their beliefs, found a way to resolve that contradiction to reduce their discomfort. If someone of Obama’s stature was supportive, it allowed people to feel better about voting for Trudeau.
www.macleans.ca/politics/ottawa/blanchet-to-wexiters-no-separatist-tips-for-you-politics-insider/


Ah..........so it wasn't the Russians we needed to worry about meddling in our election ..............just an ex-American president.

Who else would it be .
 
Mowich
Conservative
+5
#15
How Alberta pays Quebec’s bills: Four charts that show Alberta picks up the tab

In just 11 years, Albertans have paid out almost $240 billion to the rest of Canada.

That number is more than one-and-a-half times as much as B.C. and Ontario combined, whose taxpayers pitched in $54.6 billion and $97.9 billion respectively, the other two largest net contributors to the federal balance sheet.

The money is sent to Ottawa as part of net federal fiscal transfers — basically the residents of Alberta, British Columbia and Ontario pay more in federal taxes than they get back in federal programs and transfers — they are net positive contributors to the federal finances. And in Alberta’s case it has been doing that for a lot of years.

Other provinces are net negative contributors — they get more back in federal programs and transfers than they give in taxes. In Quebec’s case its net negative contributor was minus $171.3 billion from 2007-2018.






The numbers from Statistics Canada show that Alberta’s $240 billion comes to about $5,000 a year — for 11 years — for Alberta’s taxpayers.

Ben Eisen, a senior fellow with the Fraser Institute’s Provincial Prosperity Initiative, said the results, per capita, were hard to ignore.

“Despite economic challenges which could reduce net contribution to federal finances, it still remains true that Alberta is a major net contributor to public finances,” he said in a phone interview.

“Far more tax revenue comes to Ottawa from Albertans than what comes back to Alberta in terms of federal services and transfers.”




Trevor Tombe, an associate professor from the department of economics at the University of Calgary, said the results were not surprising.


“The high amount of revenue raised per person is due to high income levels that exists in Alberta,” he said in a phone interview and pointed to the province’s “above average level of economic strength.”

“If you were to ask people ‘Should taxes depend on their income,’ most people would say yes.”

Tombe added that Alberta has the youngest population in Canada, which means it receives less income from federal benefits like the Old Age Security program and the Canada Pension Plan.





The Statistics Canada numbers also show Quebec benefitted most from the equalization program, raking in $107.5 billion. The program shuffles federal tax dollars to provinces with less money so all Canadians have comparable public services at comparable taxation levels.

How the statistics were gathered changed 11 years ago and so Statistics Canada does not have comparable numbers before that.

However, a study by the University of Calgary’s School of Public Policy showed that from 1961 to 2017, Alberta’s net federal fiscal transfers amounted to more than $600 billion.

How much money Alberta contributes to the rest of Canada is one of the things that will be examined by a panel set up by Premier Jason Kenney as he seeks a “fair deal” from Ottawa.

“Albertans have been working for Ottawa for too long, it’s time for Ottawa to start working for us,” Kenney declared in a speech to the Alberta Manning Networking Conference. “We Albertans will not lose our heads, we are practical people, we are not unreasonable people. Nothing we are asking for is unreasonable.”





The feeling of alienation in the west was highlighted by the Liberals being shut out of Alberta and Saskatchewan in the federal election.

Eisen said he hoped the data would “promote a sense of cooperation and help Canadians from coast to coast understand how big Alberta’s contribution to everyone’s wellbeing is.”

“A strong Alberta benefits the entire country, when there’s an economically strong Alberta it spreads across the country,” he said.

“Ottawa would be far worse off without Alberta’s contribution. It would harm taxpayers all across the province because of the debt-service payments. Canada can’t reach it’s full economic potential if Alberta doesn’t reach it’s full economic potential.”


Stats Can has provided a full set of data on the positive and negative contributors that can be found at the link below.

nationalpost.com/news/canada/how-alberta-pays-quebecs-bills-four-charts-that-show-alberta-picks-up-the-tab
 
Mowich
Conservative
+3
#16
Monte Solberg: Quebec is as much an oil state as Alberta — they just let others produce it

Take my hand, will you, and I will lead you through the wardrobe to a magical place, where the only energy is clean energy, where Tesla-driving Quebecers signal as they change lanes, and the only emissions are of a private nature. Now, as we walk through a pristine old-growth forest we come upon a great eminence, a splendid figure who picks absent-mindedly at a glorious cape made entirely of recycled plastic straws. What is this place and who is this extraordinary man?

It is Imaginary Quebec of course, home to Yves-François Blanchet, leader of the Bloc Québécois. Here, he speaks for all of Quebec.

Here he has declared that he will not help Alberta “create an oil state,” suggesting that the Quebec economy isn’t itself greased and fired by decayed dinosaurs. If we had more time I would say “Pull up a plaque-encrusted neuron and sit a while in his fertile imagination.”

But time is fleeting, and we must hurry. Reality waits for no one, not even for this minor but magnificent ruler of Imaginary Quebec.

Now that we are back to the world of facts and truth let’s tour real Quebec in the province’s best-selling vehicle, the Ford F-150, a gas-guzzling stud of a truck. You’ll see a lot of them running around rural Quebec, often with a dead moose in the back. It is interesting and relevant that rural Quebec is where the Bloc Québécois won almost all its 32 seats. The Dodge Ram and GMC Sierra are also big sellers in the Quebec backwoods, the sixth- and seventh-best sellers in the province, respectively.

Thankfully, torrents of oil pour into Quebec to power those trucks and to keep the Quebec economy moving. Much of that oil comes from countries where you’ll be severely punished for saying the wrong thing, kind of like on Sportsnet. Much of it comes up the St. Lawrence in tankers, the same kind of tankers that are banned from taking Alberta oil off the north coast of British Columbia. Quebec’s biggest source of oil is the Alberta oilsands. It travels to refineries in Montreal via a long tube known as a pipeline.

That oil is then turned into gasoline and it’s a good thing, too. Quebec’s gasoline consumption is second only to Ontario’s and is growing. In 2013 Quebec drivers consumed 25,000 cubic meters of gasoline every single day. By 2018 that was up to 26,300.

Remember, 70 to 80 per cent of GHGs in the fossil fuel transportation value chain are created by vehicle combustion. The remainder you can pin on producing and transporting the oil. It turns out that in this world of hard facts, in almost every respect, Quebec is itself an oil state, even if Quebecers let other jurisdictions produce the oil that they then burn in their trucks and SUVs.

Besides, the 32.5 per cent of Quebecers who voted Bloc did so for many reasons, including concerns about the economy, immigration, Quebec identity and health care. We doubt that a plaid-jacket-wearing, F-150-driving welder from Chicoutimi voted Bloc because of his deep admiration for Greta Thunberg or because he could see himself with a moose strapped to the hood of the Tesla that he doesn’t own.

No, Quebec is a major importer, refiner and consumer of oil. Quebec is riddled with pipelines. Quebec drivers love gas-guzzling trucks.

Quebec receives billions of dollars in transfer payments every year thanks to Alberta and Saskatchewan oil production. Quebec’s consumption of oil and gas will only grow as its population grows. Pretending Quebec will soon be off oil or doesn’t rely heavily on oil-generated transfer payments is a fairytale fit for the nursery, not for serious public discourse. Awaken, Mr. Blanchet! Quebecers are up to their knees in oil.

Now let’s have a discussion based in that reality.

business.financialpost.com/opinion/monte-solberg-quebec-is-as-much-an-oil-state-as-alberta-even-though-quebecers-let-others-produce-it