Love you my countryman .


china
#1
Adamek unshakable in ring, faith

Robert Morales, Staff Writer
Posted: 04/23/2010 09:53:17 PM PDT



Sometimes people get turned off when athletes talk about religion.
It's looked upon as boring. But according to promoter Kathy Duva, a very strong faith is what has made heavyweight Tomasz Adamek the exciting fighter he is today.
If Adamek were not a strong believer, he would be having a much more difficult time these days. The Poland native has been mourning Polish president Lech Kaczynski, his wife Maria and several other of the country's high-ranking politicians who lost their lives in a plane crash April 10.
Unfortunately, there's more. About two months before that, there was another catastrophe that took several people close to Adamek, who tonight will take on Chris Arreola at Citizens Business Bank Arena in Ontario (on HBO).
"A few weeks before he started camp, he lost several close friends in a plane crash," said Duva, president of New Jersey-based Main Events Inc. "And he knew people on this (presidential) plane, too. He doesn't even talk about it ...
"He is an incredibly religious man. That's who he is. We know him well and we understand that. Then you understand that he accepts fate, he accepts things that happen. They happen for a reason. He has complete and total unshakable faith."
As Adamek sat at a table in the San Manuel Casino in Highland following Monday's final news conference, it was easy to see just by looking into his eyes he was everything Duva said he is.
Adamek came off not only as a man with a
strong belief in divinity but someone to take advice from during times of struggles.
"This is my motto in life: Without God, there is nothing," said Adamek, 33. "In everyday life, this is how I raise my children. I let them know that God is No. 1 and without him nothing makes sense.
"So it helps me in this situation and it helps me in every other aspect of life."
And, as Duva said, Adamek accepts fate. The way he explains it, it's the only way.
"Unfortunately, there is nothing we can do to help those people who perished, first my friends and now the president, because you have to believe there is some higher power which is guiding us," Adamek said. "They were unfortunate deaths of people who I know, but we shouldn't get into despair because it will not help you in life. You cannot go through life in despair. I was raised this way and I believe this is where my strength comes from is God."
Unshakable faith, indeed. It's who Adamek is and, as Duva claimed, what has helped him become a terrific fighter.
"That will carry anyone through any kind of adversity," Duva said when asked if she was concerned Adamek's sorrow will create a lack of concentration on tonight's task. "He's a guy who will stay focused on what he has to do.
"It's part of why he's gotten to where he is."
Adamek has won world titles in the light heavyweight and cruiserweight divisions. He was 3-1 in light heavyweight world title bouts, moved up in weight and went 3-0 in cruiserweight world championship fights.
With a thirst to become heavyweight champion, Adamek again moved up and is 2-0 in what used to be boxing's bread and butter division.
He brings a fine record of 40-1 with 27 knockouts into tonight's fight.
Regardless of his inner strength, he seemingly is in over his head physically against Arreola. The two heavyweights Adamek defeated over the past six months are fellow Pole Andrew Golota and Jason Estrada. Estrada is a very light hitter and Arreola refers to Golota as "an aged Andrew Golota." Golota was 41 when he was stopped in the fifth round by Adamek last October.
Arreola has a large size advantage. He is 6-foot-4 and Thursday weighed 250 1/2 pounds. Adamek is 6-1 1/2 and weighed in at 217.
"I do believe it will be competitive for a while," Arreola said. "But the thing is my job in there is to wear him down and show him what it's like to be in the heavyweight division."
No problem, said Adamek, who moved from Poland to New Jersey in 2008.
"The size of Chris Arreola really makes no difference," he said. "He's 6-8, 6-9, 260, 220, it doesn't really matter. It is what is in your head that matters, not your size.
"I don't plan to go down after three, four or five punches from Chris."
Rather, Adamek said he plans to be "quick and smart."
Arreola doesn't want to hear it.
"I don't care about this David and Goliath crap," he said. "I'm not here to preach the Bible."
Adamek is, and if he's victorious tonight against the likes of Arreola, those who yawn during religious speak might listen a little more closely in the future.



Read more: http://www.sbsun.com/sports/ci_14948342#ixzz0m1F30Jmx
 
darkbeaver
#2
Will the Poles tow the international line now that they have been punished? They are a brave people to have tried to go it alone. I saw the man fight once, he's good but I think heavy weight is stretching his skill too much. There used to be lots of good Jewish boxers in the thirties and forties.
 
darkbeaver
#3
  • Poland keeps the economic hitmen at bay, no longer needs IMF credit line
  • Poland's Health Minister Ewa Kopacz refuses to buy into Swine Flu hysteria
Polish president pushes date for country's entry into Eurozone back further, says 2015 too early
 
AnnaG
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by china View Post

Adamek unshakable in ring, faith

Robert Morales, Staff Writer
Posted: 04/23/2010 09:53:17 PM PDT



Sometimes people get turned off when athletes talk about religion.
It's looked upon as boring. But according to promoter Kathy Duva, a very strong faith is what has made heavyweight Tomasz Adamek the exciting fighter he is today.
If Adamek were not a strong believer, he would be having a much more difficult time these days. The Poland native has been mourning Polish president Lech Kaczynski, his wife Maria and several other of the country's high-ranking politicians who lost their lives in a plane crash April 10.
Unfortunately, there's more. About two months before that, there was another catastrophe that took several people close to Adamek, who tonight will take on Chris Arreola at Citizens Business Bank Arena in Ontario (on HBO).
"A few weeks before he started camp, he lost several close friends in a plane crash," said Duva, president of New Jersey-based Main Events Inc. "And he knew people on this (presidential) plane, too. He doesn't even talk about it ...
"He is an incredibly religious man. That's who he is. We know him well and we understand that. Then you understand that he accepts fate, he accepts things that happen. They happen for a reason. He has complete and total unshakable faith."
As Adamek sat at a table in the San Manuel Casino in Highland following Monday's final news conference, it was easy to see just by looking into his eyes he was everything Duva said he is.
Adamek came off not only as a man with a
strong belief in divinity but someone to take advice from during times of struggles.
"This is my motto in life: Without God, there is nothing," said Adamek, 33. "In everyday life, this is how I raise my children. I let them know that God is No. 1 and without him nothing makes sense.
"So it helps me in this situation and it helps me in every other aspect of life."
And, as Duva said, Adamek accepts fate. The way he explains it, it's the only way.
"Unfortunately, there is nothing we can do to help those people who perished, first my friends and now the president, because you have to believe there is some higher power which is guiding us," Adamek said. "They were unfortunate deaths of people who I know, but we shouldn't get into despair because it will not help you in life. You cannot go through life in despair. I was raised this way and I believe this is where my strength comes from is God."
Unshakable faith, indeed. It's who Adamek is and, as Duva claimed, what has helped him become a terrific fighter.
"That will carry anyone through any kind of adversity," Duva said when asked if she was concerned Adamek's sorrow will create a lack of concentration on tonight's task. "He's a guy who will stay focused on what he has to do.
"It's part of why he's gotten to where he is."
Adamek has won world titles in the light heavyweight and cruiserweight divisions. He was 3-1 in light heavyweight world title bouts, moved up in weight and went 3-0 in cruiserweight world championship fights.
With a thirst to become heavyweight champion, Adamek again moved up and is 2-0 in what used to be boxing's bread and butter division.
He brings a fine record of 40-1 with 27 knockouts into tonight's fight.
Regardless of his inner strength, he seemingly is in over his head physically against Arreola. The two heavyweights Adamek defeated over the past six months are fellow Pole Andrew Golota and Jason Estrada. Estrada is a very light hitter and Arreola refers to Golota as "an aged Andrew Golota." Golota was 41 when he was stopped in the fifth round by Adamek last October.
Arreola has a large size advantage. He is 6-foot-4 and Thursday weighed 250 1/2 pounds. Adamek is 6-1 1/2 and weighed in at 217.
"I do believe it will be competitive for a while," Arreola said. "But the thing is my job in there is to wear him down and show him what it's like to be in the heavyweight division."
No problem, said Adamek, who moved from Poland to New Jersey in 2008.
"The size of Chris Arreola really makes no difference," he said. "He's 6-8, 6-9, 260, 220, it doesn't really matter. It is what is in your head that matters, not your size.
"I don't plan to go down after three, four or five punches from Chris."
Rather, Adamek said he plans to be "quick and smart."
Arreola doesn't want to hear it.
"I don't care about this David and Goliath crap," he said. "I'm not here to preach the Bible."
Adamek is, and if he's victorious tonight against the likes of Arreola, those who yawn during religious speak might listen a little more closely in the future.



Read more: http://www.sbsun.com/sports/ci_14948342#ixzz0m1F30Jmx

Religiously beating someone to a pulp is the Christian thing to do? "God made me give this guy cauliflower ears and a broken jaw and help him on his way to having CTBI-B"? How very odd.
 
Risus
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by china View Post

Adamek unshakable in ring, faith


Robert Morales, Staff Writer
Posted: 04/23/2010 09:53:17 PM PDT




Sometimes people get turned off when athletes talk about religion.
It's looked upon as boring. But according to promoter Kathy Duva, a very strong faith is what has made heavyweight Tomasz Adamek the exciting fighter he is today.
If Adamek were not a strong believer, he would be having a much more difficult time these days. The Poland native has been mourning Polish president Lech Kaczynski, his wife Maria and several other of the country's high-ranking politicians who lost their lives in a plane crash April 10.
Unfortunately, there's more. About two months before that, there was another catastrophe that took several people close to Adamek, who tonight will take on Chris Arreola at Citizens Business Bank Arena in Ontario (on HBO).
"A few weeks before he started camp, he lost several close friends in a plane crash," said Duva, president of New Jersey-based Main Events Inc. "And he knew people on this (presidential) plane, too. He doesn't even talk about it ...
"He is an incredibly religious man. That's who he is. We know him well and we understand that. Then you understand that he accepts fate, he accepts things that happen. They happen for a reason. He has complete and total unshakable faith."
As Adamek sat at a table in the San Manuel Casino in Highland following Monday's final news conference, it was easy to see just by looking into his eyes he was everything Duva said he is.
Adamek came off not only as a man with a
strong belief in divinity but someone to take advice from during times of struggles.
"This is my motto in life: Without God, there is nothing," said Adamek, 33. "In everyday life, this is how I raise my children. I let them know that God is No. 1 and without him nothing makes sense.
"So it helps me in this situation and it helps me in every other aspect of life."
And, as Duva said, Adamek accepts fate. The way he explains it, it's the only way.
"Unfortunately, there is nothing we can do to help those people who perished, first my friends and now the president, because you have to believe there is some higher power which is guiding us," Adamek said. "They were unfortunate deaths of people who I know, but we shouldn't get into despair because it will not help you in life. You cannot go through life in despair. I was raised this way and I believe this is where my strength comes from is God."
Unshakable faith, indeed. It's who Adamek is and, as Duva claimed, what has helped him become a terrific fighter.
"That will carry anyone through any kind of adversity," Duva said when asked if she was concerned Adamek's sorrow will create a lack of concentration on tonight's task. "He's a guy who will stay focused on what he has to do.
"It's part of why he's gotten to where he is."
Adamek has won world titles in the light heavyweight and cruiserweight divisions. He was 3-1 in light heavyweight world title bouts, moved up in weight and went 3-0 in cruiserweight world championship fights.
With a thirst to become heavyweight champion, Adamek again moved up and is 2-0 in what used to be boxing's bread and butter division.
He brings a fine record of 40-1 with 27 knockouts into tonight's fight.
Regardless of his inner strength, he seemingly is in over his head physically against Arreola. The two heavyweights Adamek defeated over the past six months are fellow Pole Andrew Golota and Jason Estrada. Estrada is a very light hitter and Arreola refers to Golota as "an aged Andrew Golota." Golota was 41 when he was stopped in the fifth round by Adamek last October.
Arreola has a large size advantage. He is 6-foot-4 and Thursday weighed 250 1/2 pounds. Adamek is 6-1 1/2 and weighed in at 217.
"I do believe it will be competitive for a while," Arreola said. "But the thing is my job in there is to wear him down and show him what it's like to be in the heavyweight division."
No problem, said Adamek, who moved from Poland to New Jersey in 2008.
"The size of Chris Arreola really makes no difference," he said. "He's 6-8, 6-9, 260, 220, it doesn't really matter. It is what is in your head that matters, not your size.
"I don't plan to go down after three, four or five punches from Chris."
Rather, Adamek said he plans to be "quick and smart."
Arreola doesn't want to hear it.
"I don't care about this David and Goliath crap," he said. "I'm not here to preach the Bible."
Adamek is, and if he's victorious tonight against the likes of Arreola, those who yawn during religious speak might listen a little more closely in the future.



Read more: http://www.sbsun.com/sports/ci_14948342#ixzz0m1F30Jmx

And the point is??
 
china
#6
Quote:

Risus;1262921]And the point is??

[/quote]
......for you to place an intelligent answer and for me to practice my English & spelling while answering your "intelligent" answers.
Last edited by china; Apr 24th, 2010 at 07:51 PM..
 
china
#7
[
Quote:

quote=AnnaG;1262843]Religiously beating someone to a pulp is the Christian thing to do? "God made me give this guy cauliflower ears and a broken jaw and help him on his way to having CTBI-B"? How very odd.

[/QUOTE]
Not everyone thinks the way you think ,AnnaG,that would really be odd.
 
china
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by darkbeaver View Post

. There used to be lots of good Jewish boxers in the thirties and forties.

Quote:

Jews who held titles from about the turn of the century to the late 30's,

The Gold Star Champs
Abe Attell
Abe Goldstein
Al McCoy
Al "The Bronx Beauty" Singer
Ben Jeby
Barney Ross
Battling Levinsky
Benny Bass
Benny Leonard
Bob Olin
Charley Rosenberg
Harry Lewis
Harry Harris
Izzy Shwartz
Jack Bernstein
Jackie Berg
Jackie Fields
Louis "Kid" Kaplan
Maxie Rosenbloom
Monte Attell
Mushy Callahan
Pinky Silverberg
Solly Kreiger
Ted "Kid" Lewis
Victor Perez
 
AnnaG
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by china View Post

Not everyone thinks the way you think ,AnnaG,that would really be odd.

Yup. People and their irrationality give me a great deal of amusement and sometimes sadness. Such is life.
 
china
#10
Adamek stamps himself as a legit contender

By Kevin Iole , Yahoo! Sports 1 hour, 12 minutes ago ONTARIO, Calif. – Tomasz Adamek used every inch of the 400-square-foot ring at the Citizens Business Bank Arena in his heavyweight bout with Chris Arreola on Saturday before a nationally televised audience on HBO.
Given that Arreola outweighed him by 33 1/2 pounds and punches like he has a horseshoe in his glove, it was the only decision he could make.
Arreola, though, was not quite as taken with it. He derisively called the strategy running after Adamek won a majority decision in a compelling match. Judge Tony Crebs scored it a draw, 114-114, but Barry Druxman had it 115-113 and Joseph Pasquale saw it 117-111 for the Polish fighter. Yahoo! Sports also scored it 114-114.

More From Kevin Iole
  • Adamek trainer Roger Bloodworth smirked when he heard Arreola say that Adamek ran.“That wasn’t running; that was boxing,” Bloodworth said.It was a masterful display of boxing for the largely unheralded Adamek, who extended his win streak to 10 and won for the 41st time in 42 career bouts. The only blemish on his record came in 2007, when he dropped a decision in a light heavyweight title bout to Chad Dawson.
Adamek has since won a cruiserweight belt and then moved up to heavyweight, where he’s added some depth to a division sorely in need of it.
Saturday’s bout was the rare heavyweight match these days that was exciting, and it had the audience into it throughout – which it wouldn’t have been if Adamek was running.
Adamek stamped himself a legitimate contender in the division with the win. He’s long been one of the sport’s most exciting fighters and has been in some memorable slugfests, particularly against Paul Briggs in 2005 and Steve Cunningham in 2008.
In addition to brothers Vitali and Wladimir Klitschko, the heavyweight division is finally starting to pick up depth and includes World Boxing Association champion David Haye and top challenger Alexander Povetkin, as well as Adamek and Arreola.
“People want to see the top guys fight each other and that’s what has to happen,” Adamek co-trainer Ronnie Shields said. “If you get the best guys fighting each other, there are a lot of good fights to be made.”
The Adamek-Arreola fight is one of those, and it could happen again. Arreola, whose eyes were so badly swollen that he joked “I look like Shrek,” said he’d like a rematch.
Adamek promoter Kathy Duva wouldn’t commit to one, but she said if it occurred, it would be in Newark, N.J., where there is a large Polish population and Adamek has a huge fan base.
Many of the Adamek faithful made the trip out West on Saturday to help create a championship-like atmosphere inside the arena. Arreola’s fans urged the big man to go for the knockout, while the Polish fans, clad in red and white, many of them wearing scarves, roared as Adamek scored repeatedly.
Adamek landed 197 of 631 punches, according to CompuBox, out-landing Arreola by 70, out-throwing him by 99 and connecting at a much higher percentage (31-24). Most of the punches Adamek landed came in four- and five-punch combinations.
He would dart in, plant his feet, fire off four or five punches, then spin away from Arreola’s power. That frustrated Arreola, who several times stopped in the middle of the ring and dropped his arms to his side, urging Adamek to bang with him.
“I love fighting, man, and I want to fight,” Arreola said after falling to 28-2. “I want to [stand] there and bang. I wanted to give people a show. I hate [expletive] chasing a guy around the [expletive] ring all night. But if that’s what I was supposed to do, then that’s what I had to do. He fought the fight he had to fight. If he would have sat there and banged with me, it would have been a short night.”
Arreola, though, didn’t have the boxing skills to cope with Adamek, who was engaging in the battle. He simply didn’t stick his chin out and ask Arreola to hit it.
Adamek worked tirelessly in camp on punching and moving and trying to frustrate Arreola.
“I couldn’t stand in front of him because he’s a tough puncher and a strong guy,” Adamek said. “I had to use my head.”
He nearly ran into problems late in the fifth round through an unfortunate break. The sole of Adamek’s left shoe split and he stumbled across the ring, and the fire-breathing Arreola stormed after him in pursuit. Making matters worse for Adamek, he entered the fight with blisters on the soles of both of his feet, making his strategy of utilizing the entire ring a painful one.
Despite that, Adamek never so much as buckled his knees despite taking some big shots from Arreola.
“I have a good chin,” Adamek said, proudly.
There’s a lot to like about Adamek, who came out hard in the 12th round and fought like he felt he needed it to win the fight.
After the 10th round, “Electric” Henry Ramirez, Arreola’s trainer, told Arreola he needed to win the final two rounds. But it was Adamek, not Arreola, who came up with the big final round.
“Maybe a lot of people didn’t know Tomasz before tonight and are surprised by how good he is,” Shields said. “He’s a strong fighter with a lot of heart and a lot of smarts. He’s right there in the mix now.
“I’m not worried about matching him with any heavyweight in the world. He’s a smart, quality fighter.”
There haven’t been many of those around in the heavyweight division recently.
The good news for boxing is that the division got a little bit stronger Saturday.
 
china
#11
ONTARIO – Chris Arreola's dream of becoming the first Mexican-American heavyweight champion turned into a nightmare Saturday night against Tomasz Adamek at Citizens Business Bank Arena.
Adamek weighed in at 217 pounds, 33 less than Arreola, but won by majority decision to improve to 41-1, mostly by outworking the heavier Arreola.
Adamek landed a higher percentage of total punches (31-24 percent) and connected on more jabs and power punches.

Judge Barry Druxman (115-113) and Joseph Pasquale (117-111) scored the fight for Adamek. Tony Crebs scored it even, 114-114.
"This is the toughest fight I have ever fought," Adamek said.
It was Adamek's third fight at heavyweight. He is a former light-heavyweight and cruiserweight champion.
He becomes the first fighter to win titles as cruiserweight, light-heavyweight and heavyweight. This was just his third fight as a heavyweight.
For Arreola, this is his second loss in a heavyweight title fight and the second to an Eastern European fighter. He was defeated by Vitali Klitschko in September.
"It was a very close fight," Arreola's trainer Henry Ramirez said. "I thought we did well early, but Chris might have gotten tired."
Adamek was able to elude Arreola's power in the early stages. He was in trouble in the fifth round, but escaped. Arreola staggered Adamek with a left and worked in a powerful right, but couldn't drop him.
"I thought I had him in the fifth round," Arreola said.
"I agree with the decision. He (Adamek) did what he wanted to do."
Arreola looked the worst of the two fighters as his left eye closed as the fight progressed.
"I hurt my hand in the fifth round, but I kept going and then I hurt it bad again in the ninth and 10th," Arreola said.
"I got buzzed by his head butts, but he beat me."
 
china
#12
Quote:

Quote: Originally Posted by darkbeaver View Post

They are a brave people to have tried to go it alone. I saw the man fight once, he's good but I think heavy weight is stretching his skill too much. .

Hey darkbeaver ,Adamek's Polish .
 
L Gilbert
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by china View Post

Adamek unshakable in ring, faith

Robert Morales, Staff Writer
Posted: 04/23/2010 09:53:17 PM PDT



Sometimes people get turned off when athletes talk about religion.
It's looked upon as boring. But according to promoter Kathy Duva, a very strong faith is what has made heavyweight Tomasz Adamek the exciting fighter he is today.
If Adamek were not a strong believer, he would be having a much more difficult time these days. The Poland native has been mourning Polish president Lech Kaczynski, his wife Maria and several other of the country's high-ranking politicians who lost their lives in a plane crash April 10.
Unfortunately, there's more. About two months before that, there was another catastrophe that took several people close to Adamek, who tonight will take on Chris Arreola at Citizens Business Bank Arena in Ontario (on HBO).
"A few weeks before he started camp, he lost several close friends in a plane crash," said Duva, president of New Jersey-based Main Events Inc. "And he knew people on this (presidential) plane, too. He doesn't even talk about it ...
"He is an incredibly religious man. That's who he is. We know him well and we understand that. Then you understand that he accepts fate, he accepts things that happen. They happen for a reason. He has complete and total unshakable faith."
As Adamek sat at a table in the San Manuel Casino in Highland following Monday's final news conference, it was easy to see just by looking into his eyes he was everything Duva said he is.
Adamek came off not only as a man with a
strong belief in divinity but someone to take advice from during times of struggles.
"This is my motto in life: Without God, there is nothing," said Adamek, 33. "In everyday life, this is how I raise my children. I let them know that God is No. 1 and without him nothing makes sense.
"So it helps me in this situation and it helps me in every other aspect of life."
And, as Duva said, Adamek accepts fate. The way he explains it, it's the only way.
"Unfortunately, there is nothing we can do to help those people who perished, first my friends and now the president, because you have to believe there is some higher power which is guiding us," Adamek said. "They were unfortunate deaths of people who I know, but we shouldn't get into despair because it will not help you in life. You cannot go through life in despair. I was raised this way and I believe this is where my strength comes from is God."
Unshakable faith, indeed. It's who Adamek is and, as Duva claimed, what has helped him become a terrific fighter.
"That will carry anyone through any kind of adversity," Duva said when asked if she was concerned Adamek's sorrow will create a lack of concentration on tonight's task. "He's a guy who will stay focused on what he has to do.
"It's part of why he's gotten to where he is."
Adamek has won world titles in the light heavyweight and cruiserweight divisions. He was 3-1 in light heavyweight world title bouts, moved up in weight and went 3-0 in cruiserweight world championship fights.
With a thirst to become heavyweight champion, Adamek again moved up and is 2-0 in what used to be boxing's bread and butter division.
He brings a fine record of 40-1 with 27 knockouts into tonight's fight.
Regardless of his inner strength, he seemingly is in over his head physically against Arreola. The two heavyweights Adamek defeated over the past six months are fellow Pole Andrew Golota and Jason Estrada. Estrada is a very light hitter and Arreola refers to Golota as "an aged Andrew Golota." Golota was 41 when he was stopped in the fifth round by Adamek last October.
Arreola has a large size advantage. He is 6-foot-4 and Thursday weighed 250 1/2 pounds. Adamek is 6-1 1/2 and weighed in at 217.
"I do believe it will be competitive for a while," Arreola said. "But the thing is my job in there is to wear him down and show him what it's like to be in the heavyweight division."
No problem, said Adamek, who moved from Poland to New Jersey in 2008.
"The size of Chris Arreola really makes no difference," he said. "He's 6-8, 6-9, 260, 220, it doesn't really matter. It is what is in your head that matters, not your size.
"I don't plan to go down after three, four or five punches from Chris."
Rather, Adamek said he plans to be "quick and smart."
Arreola doesn't want to hear it.
"I don't care about this David and Goliath crap," he said. "I'm not here to preach the Bible."
Adamek is, and if he's victorious tonight against the likes of Arreola, those who yawn during religious speak might listen a little more closely in the future.



Read more: http://www.sbsun.com/sports/ci_14948342#ixzz0m1F30Jmx

Boxing for "God"? Isn't that a bit like killing for peace?
 
china
#14
Quote:

Boxing for "God"? Isn't that a bit like killing for peace?

I don,t think he (Adamek) is fighting for God .He is only using his God given talent in copmpatitive ways .It builds you both physicaly and spiritualy ; use one in the ring the other in life.
 
china
#15
[
Quote:

quote=AnnaG;1263158]Yup. People and their irrationality give me a great deal of amusement and sometimes sadness. Such is life.

[/QUOTE]

Perhaps Anna ,the irrationality is not of "the people"; after all you don't live their lifes -just judging .
 
china
#16
  • BOXING
Tomasz Adamek defeats Cris Arreola by majority decision

The Polish heavyweight beats his opponent from Riverside on two judges' scorecards, and third judge scores the bout a draw.

Poland's Tomasz Adamek, shown celebrating a win over Andrew Golota in October, defeated Riverside's Cris Arreola in Ontario on Saturday night. (Alik Keplicz / Associated Press)
 
darkbeaver
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by china View Post

Hey darkbeaver ,Adamek's Polish .

I know, I saw him fight before, he was Polish then too. He moves on his feet very well for a heavy weight. He needs heavier hands though.
 
Praxius
#18
Quote:

.... "This is my motto in life: Without God, there is nothing," said Adamek, 33. "In everyday life, this is how I raise my children. I let them know that God is No. 1 and without him nothing makes sense.
"So it helps me in this situation and it helps me in every other aspect of life."
And, as Duva said, Adamek accepts fate. The way he explains it, it's the only way.
"Unfortunately, there is nothing we can do to help those people who perished, first my friends and now the president, because you have to believe there is some higher power which is guiding us," Adamek said. "They were unfortunate deaths of people who I know, but we shouldn't get into despair because it will not help you in life. You cannot go through life in despair. I was raised this way and I believe this is where my strength comes from is God.".....

Hey if that's the way he wants to view the world and live his life... so long as it gets him through the day, all the power to him.

But just because he thinks nothing makes any sense without a God existing, doesn't somehow mean those who don't believe in a God are running around completely clueless and scared of the world around them. He may think that "Without God, there's Nothing" but that's his perspective and his own opinion.

He can use God and his religion as a motivator in being a better fighter, but that's not some absolute power in religion to make someone better.... as everybody finds motivation in all sorts of things to get them through difficult times, be that family, a loved on, personal gain, fame, money, religion, whatever.

All I see is someone who's decently talented in what he does who's summing up his talents and accomplishments as the will of his God..... if that's what he wants to think, good for him, but I don't see him any different then any other athlete who does well who believes in different things besides God.

He believes in God and does well in a sport.... that doesn't somehow make him the be-all, end-all expert on religion and the meaning of existence, anymore then the next person.
 
china
#19
Pr[quote]
axius
Quote:

He believes in God and does well in a sport.... that doesn't somehow make him the be-all, end-all expert on religion and the meaning of existence, anymore then the next person.

Praxius ,he is an expert boxer and nowhere he is pretending to be a religious one-"expert".
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Quote:

He can use God and his religion as a motivator in being a better fighter.......

No ,he doesn't use religion/ God as a motivator -he has the God given talent ---please read .
 

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