When will the food shortages become World Wide?


ironsides
#1
And so it begins. Shortages were bound to start. the Earth cannot support both food and clean energy. Not by diverting corn into a fuel. Corn is to important a food crop.

ST. LOUIS – U.S. reserves of corn have hit their lowest level in more than 15 years, reflecting tighter supplies that will lead to higher food prices in 2011. Increasing demand for corn from the ethanol industry is a major reason for the decline.
The U.S. Department of Agriculture reported Wednesday that the ethanol industry's projected orders this year rose 8.4 percent, to 13.01 billion bushels, after record-high production in December and January.
That means the United States will have about 675 million bushels of corn left over in late August when this year's harvest begins. That's roughly 5 percent of all corn that will be consumed, the lowest surplus level since 1996.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/us_crop_report

 
damngrumpy
#2
The food shortages world wide will not be because we can't feed everyone on the planet
that is not correct. The reason you will see shortages is because of economics and a
few other issues of our own making. First economics. The third world is becoming the
industrial base because we allowed the jobs to slip away. Those in that part of the world
are becoming middle class in ever increasing numbers and they will purchase more and
better quality. In short we will compete for quality food and we will also pay a heavy price.
In addition we in North America have cheap food policies and farmers are not regarding
as valuable assets in the national market place. The age of farmers on average is nearing
sixty and younger people are not plowing the land because there is no margin of profit and
people want to buy the cheap stuff, soon that will be it. We will be eating China and India's
left overs and they in turn will have the quality because they are willing to pay for it.
Add to that with the ever shrinking national farmers, foreign countries are buying food producing
properties and if we have shortages for any reason the food will be shipped from our countries
to theirs and we will have shortages not them. China alone has set aside 175 billion dollars to
buy foreign farms. They are buying in South America, the United States and they just bought
ten of the largest Dairy operations in New Zealand. In addition Saudi Arabia is buying up large
chunks of land. Canadian Consumers will face severe shortages and skyrocketing prices and
it serves them right. They have been living off the backs of farmers for years compared to
other regions of the world.

As if that is not bad enough we see the food distribution system at work with so many middle men
and jobbers you don't know what you are getting and how good or safe it is. Inspections for example.
that add cost to Canadian producers are not measurements of the same standard for imported food.
Some say Oh we buy organic, Ya good luck, how do you know if it is in fact organic? The truth is
YOU Don't. Most people would be shocked to find that on sight inspections of the actual land and
soil do not take place, and there are no surprise inspections. Are you aware there is no real
independent inspectors, they work for huge certifying firms that get paid when the crop changes hands.
You heard me Certification companies get paid a percentage when the farmer sells it, they get paid
again when the wholesaler sells it the retailers and they get paid again when the retailers sell it to you.
Why do you think the cost is so high? In addition if you believe for a moment that Organic Growers
do no use any sprays not true. They use products like Entrust and other materials. Some of natures
poisons are even more deadly than those produced by man. I am not saying that target sprays are not
good. The fact is Entrust is used by both organic and conventional growers to kill Clear wing Moth etc.
Conventional target sprays will kill codling moth but not beneficial like lady bugs and dragon flies.
More and more target spray products are improving the marketable food we eat without any harm to
anyone. organic production also serves a useful purpose but we have to put things into perspective.
With Science leading the way instead of misinformation and hysteria, there can be plenty of food around.
The problem is if we are not willing to pay more for that food, there won't be any farmers to grow it,
and international companies and foreign countries will own our best farmland and we will go short because
we believed in cheep food instead of value. and secure supply in the end we will end up with neither while
those in other parts of the world will sit down to your dinner. No there is no pending food shortage there is
an unwillingness to pay an equitable price for food that will be shipped elsewhere.
 
gopher
+1
#3
'' the Earth cannot support both food and clean energy''

It can do so easily by bringing back electric buses and making the commuting fare tax deductible in all countries.
 
Avro
+3
#4  Top Rated Post
Ethanol is about the dumbest thing I have ever seen come forth as an energy substitute.

It turns food to fuel and uses energy to do it.

Frickin stupid.
 
gopher
#5
''Frickin stupid.''

Highly profitable for certain elites and at taxpayer expense. No surprise.
 
damngrumpy
#6
The amount of energy and fertilizer used to produce ethanol is outrageous and it also leads
to astronomical cost increases for farmers producing food. There is a lot of power in the
field of science used properly to find ways to produce more food and solve our energy and
environmental problems. If science dedicated itself to the task of finding solutions it would
also realize more profit than they have ever made before.
I believe the earth can withstand population increases and clean energy demands it is just
at what price. There are all kinds of solutions out there and we must get on with solving them.
 
Trotz
#7
There are already food shortages,
most third world countries produce nowhere enough grain and rice to feed themselves and are reliant on US subsidized wheat to survive.

All it would take is one atomic bomb on the Mid West and a billion people will starve to death within the year.
 
Cliffy
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by damngrumpy View Post

The amount of energy and fertilizer used to produce ethanol is outrageous and it also leads
to astronomical cost increases for farmers producing food. There is a lot of power in the
field of science used properly to find ways to produce more food and solve our energy and
environmental problems. If science dedicated itself to the task of finding solutions it would
also realize more profit than they have ever made before.
I believe the earth can withstand population increases and clean energy demands it is just
at what price. There are all kinds of solutions out there and we must get on with solving them.

The technological solutions are available but those in control of the economy will not allow their implementation until they can figure out how they can bilk us for them at the same or greater rate than they already do with present oil and electric power. Ah, the wonders of capitalism, where money for the few comes before that well being of the many. Yup, we live in a free and democratic society where the well being of the rich means screwing the rest.
 
Bar Sinister
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by Trotz View Post


All it would take is one atomic bomb on the Mid West and a billion people will starve to death within the year.

That may well be true, but what does it have to do with global food shortages? In fact there is much less danger of famine now than there has ever been in spite of alarmist books and articles to the contrary. Every prediction of worldwide famine since the time of Malthus has failed to materialize. I can see no reason why the current gloomy prognostications should fare any better.
 
Coup
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by ironsides View Post

And so it begins. Shortages were bound to start. the Earth cannot support both food and clean energy. Not by diverting corn into a fuel. Corn is to important a food crop.

ST. LOUIS – U.S. reserves of corn have hit their lowest level in more than 15 years, reflecting tighter supplies that will lead to higher food prices in 2011. Increasing demand for corn from the ethanol industry is a major reason for the decline.
The U.S. Department of Agriculture reported Wednesday that the ethanol industry's projected orders this year rose 8.4 percent, to 13.01 billion bushels, after record-high production in December and January.
That means the United States will have about 675 million bushels of corn left over in late August when this year's harvest begins. That's roughly 5 percent of all corn that will be consumed, the lowest surplus level since 1996.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/us_crop_report

Just two years ago or so when the real big push for ethanol was on something came out mentioning something just like this. That the food we lose is far more important, essentially, than any fuel we may gain. I think at the time corn prices were rising also because of it.

Quote: Originally Posted by Bar Sinister View Post

That may well be true, but what does it have to do with global food shortages? In fact there is much less danger of famine now than there has ever been in spite of alarmist books and articles to the contrary. Every prediction of worldwide famine since the time of Malthus has failed to materialize. I can see no reason why the current gloomy prognostications should fare any better.

If the famine is only localized on a grand scale elsewhere then, that's okay?
 
captain morgan
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

The technological solutions are available but those in control of the economy will not allow their implementation until they can figure out how they can bilk us for them at the same or greater rate than they already do with present oil and electric power. Ah, the wonders of capitalism, where money for the few comes before that well being of the many. Yup, we live in a free and democratic society where the well being of the rich means screwing the rest.

Where are the socialists on this Cliffy?.. Perhaps they are too busy criticizing anyone else for their failings or protesting as opposed to working towards the future.
 
Trotz
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by Bar Sinister View Post

That may well be true, but what does it have to do with global food shortages? In fact there is much less danger of famine now than there has ever been in spite of alarmist books and articles to the contrary. Every prediction of worldwide famine since the time of Malthus has failed to materialize. I can see no reason why the current gloomy prognostications should fare any better.

It doesn't have to be an atomic bomb,
could be a wheat plague or an economic crisis that puts farmers out of work or even the US government being no longer able to afford subsidizes
 
taxslave
#13
When the socialists take over food shortages will be equal.
 
petros
#14
We are already socialist. Under our unelected UN dictatorship, 0.02% of our CDN GDP goes for food development programs.


It's a fact.

Quote: Originally Posted by trotz View Post

it doesn't have to be an atomic bomb,
could be a wheat plague or an economic crisis that puts farmers out of work or even the us government being no longer able to afford subsidizes

ug99
 
Walter
#15
Thanks to Norman Borlaug we will never have world wide shortages.
 
petros
#16
Is Normal Borlaug going to keep the Chicago and Winnipeg markets from crashing?
 
bill barilko
#17
The Good News is that food shortages are easy to relieve short term-as anyone who's ever had a garden knows.

A 40' x 40' plot of land can produce so much food it's almost stupid, of course it's not the kind of food many people are accustomed to eating and needs care in terms of preservation/isn't necessarily the cheapest but if Cubans can do it we can do it too.

In fact we used to do it-my Grandmother had a garden that produced almost everything she needed.

When I had my garden in the early 90's almost everyone who visited was reminded of their Gran's garden.

An interesting aside-so called Community Gardens are all the rage here in Vancouver.In the beginning people's plots are crowded with all kinds of things like Potatoes, Onions, Corn but after a few years they end up growing a few specialty items like Garlic & Herbs and much of the rest is in flowers.

Why?

Because they had too much food!

EDIT-Some fabulous Garlic I produced one year all on a plot about 6' x 6'

Last edited by bill barilko; Feb 10th, 2011 at 12:30 PM..Reason: details, details
 
petros
#18
Dig community root cellars?
 
Chiliagon
#19
Alright everyone start planting your food gardens!

plant enough foods and vegetables to last an entire season!

Corn/Peas/carrots/Potatos/Lettuce/Tomatos/Cucumbers/

then you can serve yourself!!
 
petros
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by bill barilko View Post

EDIT-Some fabulous Garlic I produced one year all on a plot about 6' x 6'

Does it keep those emo twilight kids away?

Without landrace seed we are toast....
 
darkbeaver
#21
Mexican crops are reported to have suffered eighty to one hundred per cent destruction in the recent persistant cold snap and Florida has suffered major loses as well.
 
petros
#22
You can't sit down to a bowl of canola.
 
ironsides
#23
True, most of that corn is usually exported to places like Africa where people are starving and of course we use feed corn for domestic animals. First we will see as we are now, the price of meat and fresh corn going up little at a time. Soy and wheat crops will not be able to keep up and will soon follow. As was mentioned, Florida oranges were damaged by the frost this year. I only have two citrus trees and one died and the other lost all its fruit.
 
coldstream
#24
Thomas Malthus, in the the early 1800s, provided British Liberalism with its ideological argument for Free Markets, which called for market forces to reduce the excess populations. It was based on the premis that an arithmetic increase in food production could never sustain a geometric increase in population growth, therefor natural forces should be allowed to cull the human population by famine or disease.

It provided the rationale for the complete lack of government response to the Irish Potato Famine, and the periodic die offs of agricultural workers in the British colonies in India and the Carribean. It was buttressed when Darwinian theories of Natural Selection appeared in the 1860s, which were applied to concepts of Social and Economic Darwinism, and of strengthening the 'breed' through social calamities.

The fact is, with a population 10X what it was in the 1840s, there is still adequate food to feed the world, through scientific progress. The only impediment is one of delivery, and of economic connivance to create shortages, in the interests of maximizing profits, and the lack of political will to do something about it.
Last edited by coldstream; Feb 10th, 2011 at 03:05 PM..
 
petros
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by ironsides View Post

True, most of that corn is usually exported to places like Africa where people are starving and of course we use feed corn for domestic animals. First we will see as we are now, the price of meat and fresh corn going up little at a time. Soy and wheat crops will not be able to keep up and will soon follow. As was mentioned, Florida oranges were damaged by the frost this year. I only have two citrus trees and one died and the other lost all its fruit.

We have to give up eating meat daily.

Quote:

It provided the rationale for the complete lack of government response to the Irish Potato Famine

It took a famine to figure out "hey...we can make BOOZE from rotting potatoes". Silly Irish.
 
dumpthemonarchy
#26
Food shortages is another way of saying peak oil. This is outright evil PC code. Oil makes fertilizer and powers machines for high agricultural productivity. Less cheap energy means more expensive food. It means food cannot be shipped as far as cheaply as before. It is the simplest equation.

Countries want to buy land in Africa to feed themselves, leaving Africans doing with less. Another problem. People power may not permit it much longer.
 
petros
#27
Quote: Originally Posted by dumpthemonarchy View Post

Food shortages is another way of saying peak oil. This is outright evil PC code. Oil makes fertilizer and powers machines for high agricultural productivity. Less cheap energy means more expensive food. It means food cannot be shipped as far as cheaply as before. It is the simplest equation.

Countries want to buy land in Africa to feed themselves, leaving Africans doing with less. Another problem. People power may not permit it much longer.

Hell no. We'll go back to steam power from bales and fertilizer made from on farm digesters that turn bales into mycologically rich humus in a matter of hours.
 
dumpthemonarchy
#28
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Hell no. We'll go back to steam power from bales and fertilizer made from on farm digesters that turn bales into mycologically rich humus in a matter of hours.

Obviously the topic is too complex for some people.
 
ironsides
#29
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

We have to give up eating meat daily.

It took a famine to figure out "hey...we can make BOOZE from rotting potatoes". Silly Irish.

That would solve a lot of problems but I do love meat over tofu.
 
dumpthemonarchy
#30
Quote: Originally Posted by ironsides View Post

And so it begins. Shortages were bound to start. the Earth cannot support both food and clean energy. Not by diverting corn into a fuel. Corn is to important a food crop.

ST. LOUIS U.S. reserves of corn have hit their lowest level in more than 15 years, reflecting tighter supplies that will lead to higher food prices in 2011. Increasing demand for corn from the ethanol industry is a major reason for the decline.
The U.S. Department of Agriculture reported Wednesday that the ethanol industry's projected orders this year rose 8.4 percent, to 13.01 billion bushels, after record-high production in December and January.
That means the United States will have about 675 million bushels of corn left over in late August when this year's harvest begins. That's roughly 5 percent of all corn that will be consumed, the lowest surplus level since 1996.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/us_crop_report

Prices will likely go up for us next year.

Ethanol pumping up food prices - USATODAY.com

The immediate causes of the rise are clear: bad harvests due to drought in Russia , China and Argentina and floods in Australia , among other things. But a longer-term cause may come as a surprise: 24% of the U.S. corn crop is now mandated to go to ethanol, taking slack out of the world food market and making price shocks more likely, agricultural economists say.
 

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