Tonight's slowcooker...Jambalaya


Tonington
#1
It's a pretty simple recipe, like most slow cooker meals.

1lb cubed chicken breast
1 lb peeled and cooked shrimp
1/2 pound andouille sausage ( I substituted for tomato basil sausage)
4 roma tomatoes, diced
1 medium white onion, chopped
1 green bell pepper, seeded and chopped
2 stalk celery, chopped
1 cup chicken broth
2 t. dried oregano
2 t. cajun seasoning
1 t. hot sauce
2 bay leaves
1/2 t. dried thyme

Combine chicken, sausage, tomatos, onion, pepper, celery, and chicken broth. stir in herbs and spice. Heat on low for 7 hours. Add shrimp, cook for 5 minutes until shrimp are heated through.

Then it will be served over basmati rice. Two cups of rice and the jambalaya should serve 4.

Like I said, it's pretty simple. Anyone else have some good jambalaya recipes, not just for slow cookers?
 
#juan
#2
That sounds good. I like Cajun cooking but I don't have many recipes. I will definitely try this one.
 
rufus
#3
I am allergic to shrimp. Can it be made without the shrimp?
 
#juan
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by rufus View Post

I am allergic to shrimp. Can it be made without the shrimp?

I would think so. Are you allergic to other seafood like scallops?...Or soft shell crabs?
 
Tonington
#5
There are really two types of Jambalaya. Creole is the style you would find in, and around the French Quarter of New Orleans. It typically has no tomato in the recipe. Cajun is that found outside of the city in the rural areas. Cajun recipes can include crawfish, oyster, alligator, and a whole bunch of meats found in the area.

Most recipes I've come across just call for shrimp, because most of us don't have access to crawfish but there's no reason why you can't replace it with something else more to your liking, or in this case, something you aren't allergic to.
 
#juan
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by Tonington View Post

There are really two types of Jambalaya. Creole is the style you would find in, and around the French Quarter of New Orleans. It typically has no tomato in the recipe. Cajun is that found outside of the city in the rural areas. Cajun recipes can include crawfish, oyster, alligator, and a whole bunch of meats found in the area.

Most recipes I've come across just call for shrimp, because most of us don't have access to crawfish but there's no reason why you can't replace it with something else more to your liking, or in this case, something you aren't allergic to.

Hi Ton
It is interesting that people are selectively allergic to various seafoods. I have a sister who like rufus, is allergic to shrimp. I have a sister in law who loves shrimp but is very allergic to scalops.
For the Jambalaya I would suggest scallops or cubed, smoked salmon or any firm fleshed fish like Red Snapper.
 
Tonington
#7
Scallops would go quite well. I think next time I might try that. Maybe with some of the small 100 count meats.
 
VanIsle
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by rufus View Post

I am allergic to shrimp. Can it be made without the shrimp?

Hi Rufus,
I have not read the recipe but I am also allergic to prawns/shrimp. We used to have a restaurant and we served this recipe. It was ordered frequently so it must be okay. All of us still make a batch now and again. Here it is.
This is a recipe for one or two people by the way.

1/4 cup Garlic butter
1 - 4 oz. chicken breast (or bigger)
2 oz. Black Forest Ham
1 large Tomato (not canned)
1/2 medium onion
1/2 large green bell pepper
1 TBSP Cajun Spice (aka Blackening Spice)
1 TBSP fresh parsley (I usually don't bother with the parsley at home)
1/2 cup cooked Penne Regate (that's a very rough guesstimate - I would use at least a cup)
Saute chicken in garlic butter until almost cooked. Add remaining ingredients except pasta and saute again. Then add pasta and toss until pasta is heated through.
I like my food somewhat spicey so that tablespoon of cajun spice is something you want to be careful with. I cut that to a half for myself. We have always prepared the ingredients for this and then in a sauce pan (large frying pan) we have made individual servings. (pre-cook the chicken and the penne and cut up the ham, pepper and 1/4 the tomato and dice the onion into large pieces).We do it this way so that those who want it spicier can have the extra spice added as it is better added while cooking.
 
VanIsle
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by Tonington View Post

It's a pretty simple recipe, like most slow cooker meals.

1lb cubed chicken breast
1 lb peeled and cooked shrimp
1/2 pound andouille sausage ( I substituted for tomato basil sausage)
4 roma tomatoes, diced
1 medium white onion, chopped
1 green bell pepper, seeded and chopped
2 stalk celery, chopped
1 cup chicken broth
2 t. dried oregano
2 t. cajun seasoning
1 t. hot sauce
2 bay leaves
1/2 t. dried thyme

Combine chicken, sausage, tomatos, onion, pepper, celery, and chicken broth. stir in herbs and spice. Heat on low for 7 hours. Add shrimp, cook for 5 minutes until shrimp are heated through.

Then it will be served over basmati rice. Two cups of rice and the jambalaya should serve 4.

Like I said, it's pretty simple. Anyone else have some good jambalaya recipes, not just for slow cookers?

This sounds good but it really sounds like a lot of work. Our recipe is very quick. You can pre-cook the chicken and the penne' anytime and the rest can be cut up and your meal ready in about 10 min. We only use cajun spice. (we use some salt while cooking the pasta) By the way - don't substitue the black forest ham. The flavour needs to be there. We buy a chunk of it and cut it up in pieces the size we prefer. My whole recipe is changeable to sizes and amounts of all the things in there that you like because it is set up for individual servings.
 
karrie
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by VanIsle View Post

This sounds good but it really sounds like a lot of work. Our recipe is very quick. You can pre-cook the chicken and the penne' anytime and the rest can be cut up and your meal ready in about 10 min.

His meal is ready in about 10 mins as well when you're talking actual prep time. The only difference seems to be when you prepare it... before you leave for work, and leave it simmer in the slow cooker all day, or after a day of work.
 
Tonington
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by karrie View Post

His meal is ready in about 10 mins as well when you're talking actual prep time. The only difference seems to be when you prepare it... before you leave for work, and leave it simmer in the slow cooker all day, or after a day of work.

Yes, that's about the sum of it, and I have a tight kitchen to work in, being that it's a $630 a month apartment...and I have a fish tank taking up about 1/5 of my counter space!

Some day, I won't be living in a shoe box...
 

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