... and here comes the food shortages I said would happen


B00Mer
#91
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

Hairdressers for sure qualify. Many of the rest either qualify for EI or some other program.

If they are paid hourly by the place they work..

But some small salons work off what they earn from the customer and do not qualify.

I know 2 guys, they share the rent and earn what they get in the chair.

They don't qualify.
 
pgs
#92
Quote: Originally Posted by B00Mer View Post

If they are paid hourly by the place they work..

But some small salons work off what they earn from the customer and do not qualify.

I know 2 guys, they share the rent and earn what they get in the chair.

They don't qualify.

Small business?
 
B00Mer
#93
Quote: Originally Posted by pgs View Post

Small business?

Yup, their account said nope, the banks said nope.

Same for me. If I had paid myself a wage vs a dividend I would have qualified.

But I don't
 
pgs
#94
Quote: Originally Posted by B00Mer View Post

Yup, their account said nope, the banks said nope.

Same for me. If I had paid myself a wage vs a dividend I would have qualified.

But I don't

Smarten up .
 
B00Mer
#95
Quote: Originally Posted by pgs View Post

Smarten up .

No paying a dividend saves me money in the long run.

In a Covid-19 world or not.
 
pgs
+1
#96
Quote: Originally Posted by B00Mer View Post

No paying a dividend saves me money in the long run.

In a Covid-19 world or not.

But you donít get the free money . As if it is free .
 
B00Mer
+1
#97
Quote: Originally Posted by pgs View Post

But you donít get the free money . As if it is free .

It's isn't free money.. I am still earning about $8,000 to $10,000 per month per truck down from $16,000.. I don't qualify.

Also, the $40,000 only $10,000 is "free" (carried by taxpayers) and $30,000 has to be paid back.

Your Children and their Children will be paying for this for years.
 
taxslave
+2
#98
As an O/O you might make a go of it on $10g. certainly not paying wages.
 
petros
+1
#99
Quote: Originally Posted by B00Mer View Post

It's isn't free money.. I am still earning about $8,000 to $10,000 per month per truck down from $16,000.. I don't qualify.
Also, the $40,000 only $10,000 is "free" (carried by taxpayers) and $30,000 has to be paid back.
Your Children and their Children will be paying for this for years.

Nope. 5 year bonds due Jan 22 2025.
 
B00Mer
+1
#100
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

As an O/O you might make a go of it on $10g. certainly not paying wages.

You can if the truck is 100% paid off..

I will post a photo of a truck I want to buy in Laredo.. almost new..

But in Canada the same truck is twice the amount in cost or a bit more.. $38,900 here in Texas.
 
Twin_Moose
#101
Quote: Originally Posted by B00Mer View Post

If they are paid hourly by the place they work..
But some small salons work off what they earn from the customer and do not qualify.
I know 2 guys, they share the rent and earn what they get in the chair.
They don't qualify.

Not claiming the income in their Income tax?
 
Avro52
#102
"As farmers accumulate thousands of hogs that have nowhere to go, they risk overcrowding barns that are due to take deliveries of new piglets...Euthanasia is the most humane option in some cases, said a spokesman for the National Pork Producers Council."

WSJ
 
B00Mer
+1
#103
Quote: Originally Posted by Twin_Moose View Post

Not claiming the income in their Income tax?

You incorporate you business and rather than paying CCP, and all that fun stuff at year end of the year you just pay yourself a dividend from your company..

Less of a tax rate and you avoid other Province and Federal costs
 
Twin_Moose
#104
Quote: Originally Posted by B00Mer View Post

You incorporate you business and rather than paying CCP, and all that fun stuff at year end of the year you just pay yourself a dividend from your company..
Less of a tax rate and you avoid other Province and Federal costs

I understand dividends, you can still qualify for the out of work self employed payout, not for the up to $40,000.00 loans.
 
petros
+1
#105
A once a lifetime opportunity.

I know of a Wagyu beef producer offering cut and wrapped sides at $5.50 an lb.

I need another freezer. There is no way I'm letting this slip through my fingers.

If serious I'll give you Julie's #.
 
taxslave
+1
#106
Quote: Originally Posted by B00Mer View Post

You incorporate you business and rather than paying CCP, and all that fun stuff at year end of the year you just pay yourself a dividend from your company..
Less of a tax rate and you avoid other Province and Federal costs

Not paying CPP could come back to bite you in the ass when you get old.
 
Dixie Cup
+2
#107
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

Not paying CPP could come back to bite you in the ass when you get old.



If he takes what he saves in Taxes and puts funds into a TFSA and/or RRSP, he'll be fine. One just needs discipline and determination. Most people don't have that tho' I must admit. With any discretionary funds available, savings don't necessarily take front and centre - it's usually "oh, I have extra money - what "toy" can I buy?
 
pgs
+1
#108
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

Not paying CPP could come back to bite you in the ass when you get old.

Self employed pay both the employer and employee portion costing about double per year . For whatever that is worth .
 
petros
+1
#109
Quote: Originally Posted by B00Mer View Post

Ive lost 50% of my revenue per trip south, a few hundred isn't going to replace a few thousand..
$3600 USD is to Canadian is $5,062.21 CAD
Now they are paying only $3400 CAD.
A shortfall of $1600 X 3 trips $5400 lost.
Fuel savings maybe $1000 in the month
Net loss $4400, my truck payments are $3535 per month on this truck, oil change and filters $525, insurance, trailer rental, and so on..
I'm dam near working for free right now.

Sounds like farming.
 
Twin_Moose
+1
#110
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Sounds like farming.

It's a lifestyle
 
Walter
#111
Shelves are very full at every store I go to.
 
taxslave
#112
Quote: Originally Posted by pgs View Post

Self employed pay both the employer and employee portion costing about double per year . For whatever that is worth .

They don't have to. It is optional. This is fine if as Dixie says one starches that money away or your business is a roaring success. Unfortunately the failure rate for small business is quite high and when a former self employed reaches retirement age there is often not much there. In all the years I ran a business I always paid CPP. I am retiring in a few months and have almost maximum CPP. I have a friend that has been self employed most of her life and is good for something like$25/month. She is land rich but cash poor and will probably have to sell more of the farm to survive.
 
petros
+1
#113
Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

Shelves are very full at every store I go to.

Sweet. So send me as many bottles of Woodland or Coglin's liquid smoke as you can find.

I'll pay well.
 
pgs
#114
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

They don't have to. It is optional. This is fine if as Dixie says one starches that money away or your business is a roaring success. Unfortunately the failure rate for small business is quite high and when a former self employed reaches retirement age there is often not much there. In all the years I ran a business I always paid CPP. I am retiring in a few months and have almost maximum CPP. I have a friend that has been self employed most of her life and is good for something like$25/month. She is land rich but cash poor and will probably have to sell more of the farm to survive.

Yes that sucks . I also paid mine and receive a monthly deposit . At present it just increases my taxable income but will come in handy once I pack it in .
 
Twin_Moose
+2
#115
Federal plan to redirect $50M in surplus food not as simple as it sounds

Quote:

When Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced a $50 million surplus food purchase program last week, it seemed like a win-win: instead of letting the food that restaurants can't use right now go to waste, the federal government would help redistribute excess inventory to organizations that help feed vulnerable populations.

But what the food sector wants to get rid of isn't necessarily what charities need.
Even though Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada plans to start spending on the program by the end of this month, those intended to benefit from it aren't sure how it will work.
Agriculture Minister Marie-Claude Bibeau said the government would "start the conversation" with food security organizations that already benefit from $100 million in extra funding announced earlier this spring: Food Banks Canada, Second Harvest (Canada's largest food rescue organization), Community Food Centres Canada, the Breakfast Club of Canada and the Salvation Army.

The surplus commodities she suggested might be eligible for these purchases included poultry, potatoes and mushrooms — foods people tend to consume differently at home than when they're dining out.
Eligible commodities are still being evaluated, department spokesperson James Watson told CBC News this week. He added that the purchases "will be done in a manner that respects the needs and health of vulnerable populations in Canada" and "fairly compensates agricultural producers and agri-food processors."
Bibeau told the Commons agriculture committee on Wednesday that officials are consulting with both producers and charities to see what's available, where and in what format, in order to make "perfect matches" where possible. The initial $50 million isn't limited to purchases and could also help with logistics such as transportation, she said.
Food Banks Canada told CBC News it did not have anyone who could speak about the new program.
Lori Nikkel, CEO of Second Harvest, also declined an interview, saying she'd only had preliminary discussions with federal officials. In March, her organization launched a national task force to rescue food and redirect it to vulnerable people during the pandemic. She said she's hoping this program is "streamlined, with a view of keeping this food out of landfill and getting it to vulnerable families as quickly as possible."
Want fries with that?
Kevin MacIsaac, general manager of the United Potato Growers of Canada, estimates his sector is sitting on about $200 million worth of surplus inventory right now. Even if the government purchases nothing but potato products (which it won't), it won't be enough to clear that inventory.
"It's on the right track, because we need to take some ... inventory out of the system," he said. "We've lost so much time with people being at home. It's not going to be used. It's going nowhere."
The first challenge will be transportation — the potatoes aren't necessarily where they're needed most. The largest surplus inventories are in New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, Alberta and Manitoba.
Quebec has taken a bit of a hit from temporarily sidelining its famous chip trucks, but processors believe the potato inventory in the province is manageable, MacIsaac said. In Ontario, many potatoes are processed into potato chips — and quarantine stress-snacking has boosted snack food sales by over twenty per cent.
Atlantic French fry giant McCain Foods was one of the first producers to applaud the new program, with president and CEO Max Koeune saying he was "encouraged" by the prime minister's appreciation of the problem "and the commitment to more funding if and when required."
But will this program buy up the frozen fries that pubs and fast-food restaurants aren't serving? Such products keep longer than fresh potatoes, but they require freezer storage that charities may not have. Food banks prefer to distribute raw potatoes — but even under ideal storage conditions, last year's crop has to be used for something by August.
If the government purchases mostly raw potatoes, MacIsaac isn't sure who can pack them. Grocery store demand for potatoes is up, so those who wash, bag and box potatoes are busy.
Meanwhile, producers have to make planting decisions without knowing how long the pandemic will disrupt things. French fry processors are cutting their grower contracts by 15 to 30 per cent, based on the size of their surplus inventories.
"The difficulty is the timing," MacIsaac said. "You get one shot at this."
Who is this for?
Canada's initial foray into surplus food purchasing is dwarfed by the decades-long American practice of bailing farmers out with billions of dollars of food aid spending.
"The U.S. programs ... tend to be more designed to support the industry," said Jean-Michel Laurin, president and CEO of the Canadian Poultry and Egg Processors Council. He said he's been told Canada's program will focus on the needs of the recipients.
Laurin said he hopes the government purchases will be destined not only for the food banks that help individual households but also for soup kitchens, shelters and organizations like Meals on Wheels that prepare food for groups.
The surplus inventory his members are struggling with was destined for food services — things like giant packages of frozen egg scramble. "That's not suitable for an individual family, but a soup kitchen can do something with it," Laurin said.
Quick-serve restaurants buy breaded chicken products like nuggets and patties that aren't fully cooked, then fry them before serving. Those uncooked poultry products can't be distributed to individuals, but could be cooked by a shelter, for example.
"The reality of our industry is that it takes a couple of months to adjust production to meet a new lower market demand," Laurin said. While the number of chickens being raised started to go down this week, the turkeys, chickens and eggs from earlier this spring were all processed in some form — and may not find a market in the hospitality sector for months.
"Some of our members are in financially unsustainable positions," Laurin said. "Could [this program] be one of several things that makes a positive difference? Probably. Maybe. We'll see. It depends on how they design it."
U.S. a poor model
"What there's a lot of is not necessarily what we should eat a lot of," said Sophia Murphy, a senior agriculture specialist with the International Institute for Sustainable Development. "We don't really want to see Canadian children or food banks suddenly filled with McCain french fries, honestly.
"If we do this based on what we've produced too much of, and not based on what our own nutritional guidelines would suggest ... there's a mismatch there that in the long run is a problematic way for the government to be trying to mediate."
Unlike the American approach to aiding low-income households — which supports the farm sector with things like school lunch programs but also sometimes sees farcical food aid excesses, such as caves of homeless cheese — the Canadian approach traditionally has been to put money in people's hands and let them decide what to eat.
If Canada is moving toward food surplus purchasing, Murphy said, there's a risk of the market being distorted in two ways.
"You're not giving people [who consume the food] any say," she said — which would interfere with the demand side of the equation.
Meanwhile, she said, you're disrupting otherwise rational corrections in market supply, telling growers "it's okay to grow all these mushrooms ... But I'm not sure buying all their mushrooms is really the answer. What about tomorrow's mushrooms?"
Growers and processors need some protection from the otherwise brutal effects of sudden market changes, but this protection needs to prepare for how the market is shifting, not simply bail them out, she said.

"I suspect we're not going back to a $90 billion a year restaurant industry in Canada, not soon."

 
B00Mer
+1
#116
Looking like it's time to cash in the chips in Canada.

When Light Speed and Bison have more than half their fleet parked, things are bad.

But if you're working interstate within the USA money is good, still lots of work.

Time to return to the USA for good..
 
B00Mer
+1
#117
Over 88,000 Trucking Jobs Just Disappeared

https://www.thetruckersreport.com/88...t-disappeared/
 
Tecumsehsbones
+1
#118
Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

Shelves are very full at every store I go to.

Be sure to stick in your oar off-topic whenever you're feeling insecure and in need of attention, birther.
 
pgs
#119
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

Be sure to stick in your oar off-topic whenever you're feeling insecure and in need of attention, birther.

Be sure to remind everyone .
 
Tecumsehsbones
+1
#120
Quote: Originally Posted by pgs View Post

Be sure to remind everyone .

Be sure to lick the windows. I know you will.
 

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