Canadians prefer Obama over own leaders


I think not
#1
A new poll suggests Canadians would prefer to vote for Barack Obama rather cast a ballot for their own political leaders, while 45 per cent of Americans envy Canada's health care system.
The bi-national survey, conducted by the Strategic Counsel for CTV and The Globe and Mail, showed that here in Canada, Obama was more admired than Prime Minister Stephen Harper -- or any other national leader.
"Some would read (the results) as an indictment of our political leaders," the Strategic Counsel's Peter Donolo told CTV.ca. "Others would say it's an acknowledgement of the phenomenal nature of Obama's appeal. He really is a prototype of his own; he's broken the mold."
Stephane Dion trailed far behind the other leaders, just ahead of Republican presidential nominee John McCain:
  • Barack Obama: 26 per cent
  • Stephen Harper: 21 per cent
  • Hillary Clinton: 16 per cent
  • Jack Layton: 9 per cent
  • Gilles Duceppe: 6 per cent
  • Stephane Dion: 5 per cent
  • John McCain: 3 per cent
Obama appealed to people across Canada's political spectrum, with 24 per cent of conservative-minded voters choosing him and 28 per cent of liberal thinkers.
"I think there's a sense in Canada that we're in a rut with our political situation, and I think there's a fatigue with the nature of politics in Ottawa as we watch it through question period -- the very cranky, minority-government style politics. There's a little more envy than usual south of the border," said Donolo.
This recent poll by The Strategic Counsel surveyed 1,000 Canadians and 1,000 people in the United States.
When it came to health care, 45 per cent of Americans felt Canada had a superior system, while 42 per cent thought the United States should stick with its own.
Meanwhile, the vast majority of Canadians, 91 per cent, felt that Canada's health care system was better than the United States.
Canada tilts to the left
When Canadian respondents were asked how to define their political views, regardless of how they actually vote, slightly more than half described themselves as liberal:
  • Very liberal: 12 per cent
  • Liberal: 39 per cent
  • Conservative: 38 per cent
  • Very conservative: 3 per cent
Respondents in the United States were slanted in the other direction, and also had more people who considered themselves on the extreme right of the political spectrum:
  • Very conservative: 10 per cent
  • Conservative: 47 per cent
  • Liberal: 30 per cent
  • Very liberal: 7 per cent
"In general, I think on a lot of issues the United States are a more polarized society," said Donolo. "When you look at the number of how many hardcore conservatives there are in the U.S., it's a pretty significant number."
Gay marriage
The same poll also suggested Canadians are far more liberal than Americans, with 70 per cent supporting gay marriage.
When it came to gay marriage, 68 per cent of Canadians backed supported it, while 28 per cent were against it. In 2005, when the government was considering whether to repeal the gay marriage bill, 55 per cent were in favour of gay marriage.
"I think this points to the reality being a lot less threatening to people than the concept. As people have gotten used to the issue, there's been less anxiety over it," said Donolo.
Aside from being more politically right-of-centre, Americans also appear to be more religious.
Respondents in the United States went to religious services more frequently than Canadians:
  • Every week or almost every week: Canada 23 per cent, U.S. 46 per cent
  • Once a month: Canada 8 per cent, U.S. 11 per cent
  • A couple of times a year: Canada 27 per cent, U.S. 16 per cent
  • Never or hardly ever: Canada 42 per cent, U.S. 27 per cent
Technical notes

The poll was conducted between June 12-22 by The Strategic Counsel for CTV and The Globe and Mail.

The sample size was 1,000 people in each country. A proportionate random national sample has a margin of error of plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

http://www.ctv.ca/servlet/ArticleNew...hub=TopStories
 
Praxius
Free Thinker
#2
Quote: Originally Posted by I think not View Post

A new poll suggests Canadians would prefer to vote for Barack Obama rather cast a ballot for their own political leaders, while 45 per cent of Americans envy Canada's health care system.

Fair enough, but I wouldn't vote for Obama as Prime Minister of Canada.... he needs to know a little bit about Canada then he currently does before I think about that.

That's like voting me in as the next President of the US.... it just wouldn't happen

Quote:

The bi-national survey, conducted by the Strategic Counsel for CTV and The Globe and Mail, showed that here in Canada, Obama was more admired than Prime Minister Stephen Harper -- or any other national leader.

Well that doesn't suprise me.... Harper has been in power for how long now? Obama hasn't even become the President yet, let alone enough time to screw anything up..... so that's a bit unbiased at this time.

Talk is one thing, action is another. Not that I'm defending Harper any, but it's not much of an accurate comparision.

Quote:

"Some would read (the results) as an indictment of our political leaders," the Strategic Counsel's Peter Donolo told CTV.ca. "Others would say it's an acknowledgement of the phenomenal nature of Obama's appeal. He really is a prototype of his own; he's broken the mold."
Stephane Dion trailed far behind the other leaders, just ahead of Republican presidential nominee John McCain:

Dion beat McCain? Jezzus, I don't know what's worse...... McCain as being the bottom of the barrel, or Dion for actually making it above McCain..... that's saying something *shudders*

Quote:

  • Barack Obama: 26 per cent
  • Stephen Harper: 21 per cent
  • Hillary Clinton: 16 per cent
  • Jack Layton: 9 per cent
  • Gilles Duceppe: 6 per cent
  • Stephane Dion: 5 per cent
  • John McCain: 3 per cent

Holy hell..... Duceppe beat out both Dion and McCain.... now that's just scary.... I mean Duceppe is an idiot who only has interests in Quebec, let alone the rest of Canada or the rest of the world..... and Dion (The Opposition Leader) and McCain (The Republican Presidential Canidate) got beat out by Duceppe?

That's bad.

Quote:

Obama appealed to people across Canada's political spectrum, with 24 per cent of conservative-minded voters choosing him and 28 per cent of liberal thinkers.
"I think there's a sense in Canada that we're in a rut with our political situation, and I think there's a fatigue with the nature of politics in Ottawa as we watch it through question period -- the very cranky, minority-government style politics. There's a little more envy than usual south of the border," said Donolo.
This recent poll by The Strategic Counsel surveyed 1,000 Canadians and 1,000 people in the United States.
When it came to health care, 45 per cent of Americans felt Canada had a superior system, while 42 per cent thought the United States should stick with its own.
Meanwhile, the vast majority of Canadians, 91 per cent, felt that Canada's health care system was better than the United States.

Well I much rather the current system we have then the current system the US has.... which is into private health care that tends to classify expensive proceedures as "Experimental" and leaves you high and dry suffering until you die.

Quote:

Canada tilts to the left

When Canadian respondents were asked how to define their political views, regardless of how they actually vote, slightly more than half described themselves as liberal:

  • Very liberal: 12 per cent
  • Liberal: 39 per cent
  • Conservative: 38 per cent
  • Very conservative: 3 per cent
Respondents in the United States were slanted in the other direction, and also had more people who considered themselves on the extreme right of the political spectrum:
  • Very conservative: 10 per cent
  • Conservative: 47 per cent
  • Liberal: 30 per cent
  • Very liberal: 7 per cent
"In general, I think on a lot of issues the United States are a more polarized society," said Donolo. "When you look at the number of how many hardcore conservatives there are in the U.S., it's a pretty significant number."

Well we are two different countries, with different methods of government, and different cultures and laws.... that's not really suprising.

Quote:

Gay marriage

The same poll also suggested Canadians are far more liberal than Americans, with 70 per cent supporting gay marriage.

I do.... Marriage existed long before Christianity or most currently know Religions took it over as their own.... they have no right to dictate what a marriage is or who can have one with who or what.

Quote:

When it came to gay marriage, 68 per cent of Canadians backed supported it, while 28 per cent were against it. In 2005, when the government was considering whether to repeal the gay marriage bill, 55 per cent were in favour of gay marriage.

"I think this points to the reality being a lot less threatening to people than the concept. As people have gotten used to the issue, there's been less anxiety over it," said Donolo.
Aside from being more politically right-of-centre, Americans also appear to be more religious.

Respondents in the United States went to religious services more frequently than Canadians:

  • Every week or almost every week: Canada 23 per cent, U.S. 46 per cent
  • Once a month: Canada 8 per cent, U.S. 11 per cent
  • A couple of times a year: Canada 27 per cent, U.S. 16 per cent
  • Never or hardly ever: Canada 42 per cent, U.S. 27 per cent

Sounds about right.

But for one thing, this does prove the point that although there are similarities between the US and Canada, there isn't enough similarities to claim we're just like one another..... and we're about as similar as if you compared either country to the UK or Australia. We all have our differences.... if not, we'd all be a part of the same country by now.
 
MikeyDB
#3
Well you're on safe ground here ITN! This "Canadian" Content board harbors sufficient quantities of wannabe Americans that bringing up he American election ...even though we "ought-not" think about or ....perish the thought.....mention America as a consideration of the geopolitical dynamic of this little planet.... a rousing chorus of YEA America will no doubt spring from the lips/pens/keyboards of manyhere at "Candian" Content....

You keep saying that Americans don't care what the world thinks about America...

Interesting strategy.
 
I think not
#4
I think the point of the article is that both Americans and Canadians are frustrated on both sides of the border with the status quo, whether it be health care or politicians or a myriad of other issues that affect our daily lives.

It's great to nit pick little nuances and its even more exciting to exaggerate shortcomings on both sides of the border, but in the end alot of change is necessary whichever way you lean. Just as Canadians find certain aspects of American culture and society nerve-racking, such is the case on our side of the border.

The comment Praxius made about being different rings true, of course we are different, but we are also very similar in many ways. It would be silly to guage just how different or just how similar we are. Both countries became independent and sovereign under different circumstances, it is only reasonable to assume there will be large differences not only in culture and government, but also the way we think, as a general population.

There are alot of things I do not understand about American society, and I have lived here most of my life, it would be pretty arrogant and presumptious of me to assume I understand everything about Canadian society.

With the exception of extremist views and hatred on both sides of the border, I would assert that everyone else is pretty dam happy having each other as neighbors.
 
#juan
No Party Affiliation
#5
The poll is horses--t . Two years ago a vast majority of Canadians had never heard of Obama.

As Praxius said, this guy hasn't even been elected yet. This is a typical little, brainless poll done by people who obviously don't have anything better to do. It is possible to make a poll say anything you want it to say.

In real terms, wait until Obama does something unpopular with Canadians...And he will..... He will quickly move to the bottom of the list..
 
darkbeaver
Republican
#6
Obama's slick and polished. If the masters had selected a specimin more like him eight years ago they could have avoided much revealing and damageing controversay caused by thier permitting a half wit to sit in the offal office. I believe they have rectified thier poor selection process and Obama is the result, he'll make a fine president for the monied class and he'll kill and destroy more with less blowback than Bush did.
Whatever the common citizen of either country prefer in a leader matters not at all, they are for all intents and purposes irrelevant to the outcomes of elections now, and if the truth be known Obama will be in a very real manner our leader.
 
MikeyDB
#7
ITN

I'm not sure how you'd define "happy".... if you mean satisfied that being pals with the neighborhood bully is preferable to being declared a member of the "axis of evil" then yes. If you mean it's convenient to surender sovereignty in the name of cowering under the shield of the largest military machine in the history of mankind....then yes. If you mean getting sold-out by Brian Mulroney and the wheeler-dealers that built this house of cards called NAFTA...well.......

I found the sub-theme behind the episode of Pulp Fiction, where John Travlta is entertaining Mila...while her husband is out of town...informative. The dichotomy between generations...and I suppose between philosophies was flirted with in a metaphorical way I think was clever. There are only two kind of people in the world...one likes Elvis Presley and one likes the Beatles..... One culture is infatuated with the me-first...look at me....see me...watch me.... I'm an icon of American sexuality and rugged individualism..... Imagine......
 
jimmoyer
#8
I didn't follow your thoughts about PULP FICTION. Expand on that.
Sounds interesting.
 
Praxius
Free Thinker
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by I think not View Post

I think the point of the article is that both Americans and Canadians are frustrated on both sides of the border with the status quo, whether it be health care or politicians or a myriad of other issues that affect our daily lives.

True... many in many countries are. The system in which we all have been following for the last 200 or so years hasn't really gotten us much futher.... there are still wars, still violence against civilians in their own countries, racism, biggotry, religious feuds, corrupt leaders with their own agendas, different classifications of people within a country where there should only be one (Not Middle, Upper or Lower Class Citizens)

Many people are fed up with a lot of the crap we go through each day in our lives, both in Canada and the US, for many different reasons.

But what is the solution?

Quote:

It's great to nit pick little nuances and its even more exciting to exaggerate shortcomings on both sides of the border, but in the end alot of change is necessary whichever way you lean. Just as Canadians find certain aspects of American culture and society nerve-racking, such is the case on our side of the border.

I fully understand that. On occasion I admit that although I don't understand, let alone want to live amongst it, the US has a right for owning firearms..... to a degree (Where it is the defence of your own home and family and against forign invaders or corrupt governments attempting to oppress you and infringe apon your Constitution...... not to use firearms to shoot people on the streets or feel it's your right to stroll around town with a couple of pocket rockets.) You guys see it differently though, so I guess, who am I to argue?

But when it comes to situations like school shootings and people are seeking solutions to prevent them, I'll still speak my mind on what I think will solve it (Not completely but at least make it more difficult to occur)

Quote:

The comment Praxius made about being different rings true, of course we are different, but we are also very similar in many ways. It would be silly to guage just how different or just how similar we are. Both countries became independent and sovereign under different circumstances, it is only reasonable to assume there will be large differences not only in culture and government, but also the way we think, as a general population.

True, but what would be the final objective in reconizing these similarities?

We are very much the same in some aspects, but hypothetically, if we just decided to merge the two countries together as one larger nation, those other differences would become very noticable and conflicts would follow shortly after..... such as Gun Control, Health Care, Form of Government, THE METRIC SYSTEM!!!

Quote:

There are alot of things I do not understand about American society, and I have lived here most of my life, it would be pretty arrogant and presumptious of me to assume I understand everything about Canadian society.

With the exception of extremist views and hatred on both sides of the border, I would assert that everyone else is pretty dam happy having each other as neighbors.

I personally don't care if I live by the US, Iran, China, or Peru.... so long as their way of life is not "Forced" on me and we both can live in our countries without any major involvements on our ways of life.....

But unfortunatly, both the US and Canada have been trading and dealing with one another for so long, it is hard not to have something occur in the US which affects our way of life, and vice versa.

However, Canada doesn't do very much to cause many problems in the US except perhaps our drug trade..... as I see it anyways.

Is there anything that comes to your mind as a US Citizen that you can think of that Canada has done recently that has impacted the lives of your people? (Just a side question. As you said and I relate, I'm not a complete expert on the things within your country)
 
MikeyDB
#10
A society creates its cultural iconology from its own "fabric". A society that regards the individual as the ultimate focus of eveything from values and morality to fashion and music lionizes that figure within that society that best exemplifies the zeitgeist and "color" of the society as a whole. It's entirely reasonable for America to embrace the model of the individual striving against all odds to popularize a style and behavior that tests the limits of societies values and perspectives on human sexuality...a personality defined by the focus of the society itself on everything that honors the "values" adopted as "normal" by the greater majority. Elvis was in many respects quite similar to Madonna. Both worked to present and portray themselves as an emergent psychology....a different psychology than what had been popular before. Both test sexual and gender "standards" and both are adamantly involved in being and living up to the fantasy of a self-consumed populace. Because the essential American "Identity" is the cowboy the gangster the romantic the expression of the "individual" regarding things like serving your country in war is expected....but the service isn't to the large considertion of whether this war is "right" or wrong", it is the submersion of self as icon into the subconscious of an appetite ravaged society. When Cassius Clay flirted with dodging the draft...that was distinctly American as well...but the same expression/underlying thesis is valid.... A black man refusing to fight a white-mans war...in a nation of whites who disrespect blacks....

The Beatles and in particular songs written by John Lennon and George Harrison addrssed the whole of humankind. "Imagine" flirted with the notion that too many times mankind has been held hostage to his "beliefs".... A swiming pool full of blood and offal salted with British high denomination currency notes is happily dived into by starchy bowler hatted business tycoons in one Beatles film and the message that the human race depends on the willingness of each individual to regard him or herself as a member of a community of human beings ....isn't what Elvis Presley was about by any stretch of the imagination....
 
I think not
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by Praxius View Post

Is there anything that comes to your mind as a US Citizen that you can think of that Canada has done recently that has impacted the lives of your people? (Just a side question. As you said and I relate, I'm not a complete expert on the things within your country)

Praxius, is today your good day? You seem to be posting rational stuff this fine afternoon.

Before I try and tackle your question, I would like to make a comment about the US and Canada "merging" into one state. I'm not saying you're an advocate, but it caught my attention. Neither Americans nor Canadians want to merge our two countries, aside from the fact I do no see any particular benefit in doing so, both sides have one thing in common, we're both too proud to even contemplate such a thing.

I'm not saying it's right, and I am not saying it's wrong, but for all intensive purposes neither side is interested, and I am quite happy about that.

Back to your question, I believe the United States directly impacts Canada on the economy, moreso what Canada could impact the US. If say Canada's economy were to collapse tomorrow we would definately get a cold, whereas if the US economy were to collapse Canada would most likely get pneumonia. Now put things into perspective here, the same would be true if the EU or Japan or other (secondary) economies went downwards. It's only because we happen to be the largest single country economy in the world, it makes perfect sense Canada would be more heavily impacted.

I have often heard calls from Canadians (only on forums mind you) to diversify your economic base other than gluing yourselves to the US. Of course that makes sense, I don't think any country in the world should rely on another countrys economy to keep it going.

Having said that, I'm sure you know economies have a "mind of their own" and markets dictate where you are selling your products and services. Your product and services become more marketable in the US because (of many reasons I am sure) of cost. If you are shipping your product half way around the world (especially now when transporation costs have skyrocketed due to the price of oil) you are not competitive anymore.

Another issue that you cannot easily diversify your economy is because of your Provincial trade barriers that are in place. You have become protectionists with your own country that has obviously impacted you in a negative way. It is cheaper for people in Ontario to import oil from the United States than from Alberta.

These are just examples of course.

Canada on the other hand I believe has more of an indirect impact on the United States, although this doesn't mean there is no direct impact. An example of direct impact would be the Canadian ban of cattle in the US, it did hurt the US economy, it may be much lower than an impact of say softwood lumber had on yours, but it did occur.

An indirect impact would be Canada being a major energy supplier to the US, should you guys wake up one morning and say China is buying all your energy at twice the price, we're phucked. No ifs or ands about it.

Canada does impact the US, perhaps on a smaller scale only because of the differences in economic output and the vast population gap.
 
MikeyDB
#12
"You have become protectionists with your own country that has obviously impacted you in a negative way. It is cheaper for people in Ontario to import oil from the United States than from Alberta."

How do you figure that ITN?

Doesn't NAFTA and the OPEC nations and America establish the price of a barrel of crude oil? Aren't Canadians paying the International price? I'm with you on our silly inter-provincial "protectionism".... but come on now.... Who supplies America with the most oil?

I'm all for nationalizing Canadian resources and then America can cut whatever kind of deal it can with Chavez or the Saudis or East Timor ...or wherever else America intends to plunder for its amusement.
 
I think not
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by MikeyDB View Post

ITN

I'm not sure how you'd define "happy".... if you mean satisfied that being pals with the neighborhood bully is preferable to being declared a member of the "axis of evil" then yes. If you mean it's convenient to surender sovereignty in the name of cowering under the shield of the largest military machine in the history of mankind....then yes. If you mean getting sold-out by Brian Mulroney and the wheeler-dealers that built this house of cards called NAFTA...well.......

I define happy as in your ambulances crossing our borders to take emergency cases to US hospitals when your hospitals cannot provide for them, I define happy when there is a fire on the Maine/Canadian border and your fire trucks speed through the border to provide life saving assistance, I define happy when people in Kingston cross the border and meet with American friends to play a game of golf, I define happy when your fire fighters fly from Vancouver to NYC to help with 9/11, I define happy when you have an ice storm in Ontario and Americans cross the border to assist you with anything you may need, I define happy as an airlift from the moauntains of British Columbia provided by the US Coast Guard and taken to Anchorage Alaska for emergency care.

That's what I define as happy, you on the other hand are always grumpy.
 
I think not
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by MikeyDB View Post

"You have become protectionists with your own country that has obviously impacted you in a negative way. It is cheaper for people in Ontario to import oil from the United States than from Alberta."

How do you figure that ITN?

Doesn't NAFTA and the OPEC nations and America establish the price of a barrel of crude oil? Aren't Canadians paying the International price? I'm with you on our silly inter-provincial "protectionism".... but come on now.... Who supplies America with the most oil?

I'm all for nationalizing Canadian resources and then America can cut whatever kind of deal it can with Chavez or the Saudis or East Timor ...or wherever else America intends to plunder for its amusement.

Yes MikeyDB, the price of oil is dictated by OPEC, now slap on your asphyxiating Provinicial tax barriers and add to the fact you have almost zilch distribution network and you have your answer.
 
MikeyDB
#15
And how do you suppose this protectionism developed in Canada? Could it perhaps have been the wads of cash tht America threw at Alberta and anywhere else in Canada that discovered oil?

Your definition of "happiness" or at least the situations you use to illustrate the sentiment are strangely enough shared by myself. I don't care for American coast guard vessels patrolling our coastline ...armed tot he teeth. I don't care for America's willingness to dictate "missile defense strategies" to my government. I don't care for Paul Cellucci or for many tools of the robber-barron mentality that find their way into American government.

How about America go find someone else to play.... Say Mexico!

It's not like they don't already contribute to your economic machinery....

Maybe they have oil!

Surely they have old-growth forest and available commodities of interest to America to pique the appetite of American investors...? You define the relationship between America and Canada as one of mutuality of interests. You're wrong.
 
Praxius
Free Thinker
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by I think not View Post

Praxius, is today your good day? You seem to be posting rational stuff this fine afternoon.

It all depends on the attitudes of those I am speaking with which determines my response. Respect given get's respect in turn..... as they say, garbage in / garbage out.

If someone gives me attitude without actually throwing in an actual response to the topic at hand, will only get them attitude back.

Since you started the thread and there was no position of attack towards anybody, there is no justification for any attitude or attack from my side of things and the discussion can continue respectively in my view.

Quote:

Before I try and tackle your question, I would like to make a comment about the US and Canada "merging" into one state. I'm not saying you're an advocate, but it caught my attention. Neither Americans nor Canadians want to merge our two countries, aside from the fact I do no see any particular benefit in doing so, both sides have one thing in common, we're both too proud to even contemplate such a thing.

I'm not saying it's right, and I am not saying it's wrong, but for all intensive purposes neither side is interested, and I am quite happy about that.

Agreed, and I'm no where near wanting to merge the two, but as an example on how our differences would clash, merging the two countries in one would certainly show the differences between us in a very clear manner..... heck it could get pretty nasty.

Quote:

Back to your question, I believe the United States directly impacts Canada on the economy, moreso what Canada could impact the US. If say Canada's economy were to collapse tomorrow we would definately get a cold, whereas if the US economy were to collapse Canada would most likely get pneumonia. Now put things into perspective here, the same would be true if the EU or Japan or other (secondary) economies went downwards. It's only because we happen to be the largest single country economy in the world, it makes perfect sense Canada would be more heavily impacted.

I have often heard calls from Canadians (only on forums mind you) to diversify your economic base other than gluing yourselves to the US. Of course that makes sense, I don't think any country in the world should rely on another countrys economy to keep it going.

Agreed.

Quote:

Having said that, I'm sure you know economies have a "mind of their own" and markets dictate where you are selling your products and services. Your product and services become more marketable in the US because (of many reasons I am sure) of cost. If you are shipping your product half way around the world (especially now when transporation costs have skyrocketed due to the price of oil) you are not competitive anymore.

Another issue that you cannot easily diversify your economy is because of your Provincial trade barriers that are in place. You have become protectionists with your own country that has obviously impacted you in a negative way. It is cheaper for people in Ontario to import oil from the United States than from Alberta.

That could also be related to distance, where Michigan isn't too far away from Ontario in comparison to Alberta. Of course I'm not really informed on all the details of oil and production, but I believe (Could be wrong) that the oil sands project requires more production to produce the same amount of oil as oil from an oil rig.... thereby costing more at the moment.

As you said, those are just one or two examples, but besides economy, there are many other factors, such as our gun laws and drug laws compared to the US's..... where we have more restrictions on firearms here, there is a major traffic issue with firearms coming across the borders from such places as Georgia..... while at the same time, your country has more restrictions on drugs, where a good chunk of your drug traffic comes from us...... so in that manner, both our countries are affecting our abilities to manage those laws in each of our countries.

If we go back to the hypothetical, and merged the two countries..... what would happen in these two differing laws? Would Canada start to become more relaxed to our gun laws if you guys relaxed on your drug laws, or would both become more restricted, etc?

Quote:

Canada on the other hand I believe has more of an indirect impact on the United States, although this doesn't mean there is no direct impact. An example of direct impact would be the Canadian ban of cattle in the US, it did hurt the US economy, it may be much lower than an impact of say softwood lumber had on yours, but it did occur.

True, and there was also the cattle ban the US put on our own not too long ago.... it's those direct trades in which affect our nations. If there were planned out alternative sales ideas available in such situations where one country bans something of another, then those affects might not be as bad on the country in question.

For example, our auto makers are suffering pretty badly due to the US dollar and most of those vehicles being sent to the US, rather then trying to have an alternative solution where we can deal with the vehicles internally if possible to help reduce the losses, and vice versa. I feel companies such as auto workers, lumber, farming and fishing should set themselves up for one primary client to buy their products, be that in any country with the best offer. But what should also exist are backup plans, be that alternative clients to sell to, or alternative products for that company to create for a backup plan in case.

Maybe this is already in place, but in recent examples it would seem companies are set to create and sell one thing and when that one thing goes tits up, they don't have any backup plans and then thousands lose their jobs.

Quote:

An indirect impact would be Canada being a major energy supplier to the US, should you guys wake up one morning and say China is buying all your energy at twice the price, we're phucked. No ifs or ands about it.

Canada does impact the US, perhaps on a smaller scale only because of the differences in economic output and the vast population gap.

True, but with the northern disputes, our Uranium (Being the largest exporter in the world), the US's major desire for fresh water supplies (Besides Antartica, we also have the record for supplies) and seeking secure sources of oil that doesn't require a lot of distance to ship, most of these things can and will have a major impact on the US's status in the near future as well as US/Canada relations..... we just don't talk about those things too often so we don't end up scaring you guys