Ottawa to declare federal holiday to mark legacy of residential school system


MHz
#181
Canada is always the 'bitch', we are as shallow as the ones we vote in. Good doggy, no go to your corner until called.

Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

Can you give us that in English?

Are you really expecting an edited answer? Just askin, . . .
 
Mowich
+2
#182
Quote: Originally Posted by Decapoda View Post

It's part of what seems to be a deliberate movement to redefine terms to in today's era of extreme social activism and victimhood culture.

Genocide was once a term reserved to define only the worst human atrocities of cultural "cleansing" by way of mass murder of a particular group within a larger group. The word "genocide" is a combination of the Greek word génos ("race, people") and the Latin suffix -cide ("act of killing").

There has been a conscious effort in recent times to now include within that group people who's culture has been altered through the inevitable societal change which naturally comes about from immigration and changing demographics. This is a false premise, since all cultures are in a constant state of change. If the premise has any merit, can we now declare that since our current Prime Minister declares Canadian culture dead, and that Canada is now a "post-national state", that Justin Trudeau is guilty of genocide? I don't think so.

There is no doubt that the residential school system had a negative impact on indigenous culture, and no doubt that there were bad things done within this system. This is not unique to residential schools, just ask the pope. However, the effort to "assimilate" natives into current cultural norms was done not out of a deliberate attempt to kill a culture, but to better one. Obviously we can now find fault in this effort through the lens of today's social conscience, but it's disingenuous and wrong to judge the intentions of previous generations as cultural genocide.


Agreed in full, Dec. What the supporters of this current culture of victim-hood fail to realize is that it is a defeatist attitude which mires it's practitioners in a morass of self-pity rather than empowering them to realize all their potential. Thankfully, those who advocate the culture are small in number and unlikely to grow their numbers as most Canadians realize the fallacy inherent in such beliefs. Still, the harm done to younger generations given a daily dose of the rhetoric becomes visible when the number of suicides - especially among native youth - continues to grow.

Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

I am thinking you may not be the ideal arbiter of what's what, especially as it applies to First Nations.

Were I a judge in the current state of affairs regarding natives, I would use all the law at my disposal in order to expose the lack of proven fact in many of the 'stories' being told.

Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

Turdoh is shallow.

Trudeau lacks forethought. This is an enormous disadvantage in any politician, more so in a PM as it reflects poorly upon his ability to comprehend the end result of any pronouncements especially those affecting our country. The plethora of mind-numbing idiocies he has uttered are prime examples of this flaw in his character.
 
Mowich
+3
#183
Nelson: Time's up on endless apologies as government strategy

Do not, for a solitary, single second, believe the decision to adopt a statutory holiday dedicated to truth and reconciliation in Canada’s dealings with its Indigenous peoples is anything other than a smokescreen for cowardice.

This will seem harsh to honest and sincere Canadians who feel a measure of guilt and shame over the horror-show the residential school system became down the decades.

But declare as many holidays as you want, knock down every statue across this land of those within a country-mile of some harsh policy toward First Nations people while handing out apologies and cheques by the bucketful, yet you’ll come not one iota closer to dealing with what remains this country’s biggest challenge.

So today’s policy — endless apologies, commissions of truth and reconciliation and announcing, at every venue, this is traditional Blackfoot land or similar sentiments — remains merely a sop.

Politicians cling to it, none more fiercely than our current prime minister, because it provides cover to look caring and forward thinking, when in fact, it masks a complete lack of backbone in dealing with today’s problems.

It is easier to lambaste Cornwallis, Langevin and John A. Macdonald about their collective failures in dealing with what was then the “Indian problem” than devising a program to end this impasse on how Indigenous people and other Canadians can thrive together in future.

All we hear are endless rounds of apologies, and while these are likely welcomed by many Indigenous people, time’s up on looking backward. Instead, let’s look at today’s issues. Oh, they are myriad, involving very difficult questions asked by people on all sides of this divide. Suggested routes forward risk a mountain of criticism.

So, instead, politicians take the easy points — blame their forebears, now suitably dead, for mistakes. Hey, you lose neither votes nor sleep that way.

But we all know what those problems are. So, as no elected person would dare speak them aloud because it’s a surefire vote loser, let’s summarize them. Yes, it is fiendishly complicated, but, as a starting point, there are a few obvious routes ahead.

The basic question is assimilation, separation or some hybrid solution. This differs not a lot from a century ago, and while the decisions reached with the residential school system and other government follies were fearfully brutish, there was at least some desire for action.

The reserve system remains the fulcrum point. If assimilation is to be complete, then that has to end. If separation is to be the way forward, then a formula to make that sustainable must be dragged into shape. You cannot have separation and expect some other country, i.e., Canada, to fund it forever. That’s the sweet, blinded position of teenagers: wanting freedom to stay out late but expecting mom and dad to buy and cook their supper.

Oh, and if that isn’t troublesome enough, then what about those many Indigenous people who’ve left the reserve. The educational achievements of this group are the fastest growing subset in Canada. They are thriving, though back on the reserves, they’re often dismissed and criticized.

This is harsh gruel, I know. It seems an intractable problem, which is why politicians along with those band chiefs who’ve grown wealthy on federal cash and hope for more, would rather talk about the past than the present.

But while this soul-searching goes on, the dreadful toll of incarceration, suicide, drug abuse and sexual assault continues almost unabated on some reserves. Sure, keep blaming what happened 100 years ago for this situation, and in another 100 years, we will be lodged firmly in this same, sad place.

It is far from easy but, please, enough with apologies. By now they serve little but the re-election hopes of politicians and various band chiefs. Bite the bullet and start sorting this out.

Yes, we can. Despite everything else, there are good graces on every side. Do it and then declare a national holiday. After all, should not a holiday be a celebration?

calgaryherald.com/opinion/columnists/nelson-times-up-on-endless-apologies-as-government-strategy


Indigenous people could use new role models

Re: “Stop apologizing and start making hard decisions,” Chris Nelson, Opinion, Aug. 27.

Kudos to Chris Nelson for so eloquently stating what, I believe, many Canadians feel, but are too polite or politically correct to verbalize.

No distinct group of people, including our Indigenous brothers and sisters, can enjoy “separation and expect some other country, i.e., Canada to fund it forever.” And that, I believe, is precisely what Indigenous Canadians are seeking.

Segregation for Indigenous people has been unsuccessful; assimilation has not been sought or encouraged by either side. Endless apologies and endless amounts of money thrown at the “problem” will achieve nothing.

Perhaps it’s time for those Indigenous individuals who have left the reserve, and have become successful, respected, contributing members of the Canadian mainstream, to act as role models and provide leadership for those languishing in difficult situations on the reserves.

Gustav Heinz Fredrich, Calgary

calgaryherald.com/opinion/letters/your-letters-for-wednesday-aug-29
 
Hoid
+1
#184
Its high time white people solved the indian problem.
 
White_Unifier
+1
#185
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

Its high time white people solved the indian problem.

I thought some Whites in positions of power did try that by establishing the Indian residential school system? Might be better for such people to step aside and not cause more damage thank you.
Last edited by White_Unifier; Aug 29th, 2018 at 08:39 PM..
 
Cliffy
#186
That this thread exists tells me that white privilege does not want to deal with the reality of what was done or the lasting generational effects it is still reaping on our native population. You can't just "get over" 150 years of physical, sexual, mental and spiritual trauma.
 
Mowich
+5
#187
Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

That this thread exists tells me that white privilege does not want to deal with the reality of what was done or the lasting generational effects it is still reaping on our native population. You can't just "get over" 150 years of physical, sexual, mental and spiritual trauma.

That this thread exists should tell you that many Canadians are simply fed-up with the apologies, the tears, the holidays, the virtue-signalling and continuing culture of victimhood. Forget your 'white privilege' bs, Cliffy. I have friends on the local reserve who have fallen out with other members of the community over what they see as the extreme activist element. This isn't a 'white' issue or a 'native' issue. This is an issue about a small percentage of a group of people - highly educated at that - who were delivered of an opportunity to advance their activist views when the Liberals were elected - and took full and total advantage of The Great Enabler's inability to understand the real consequences of his words and deeds. I actually credit them for a very skillful action plan. Their PR department alone deserves a lot of credit for ensuring a continuing presence in media broadcasts and publications.

Yet it is that very presence in media story after media story that began to work against them. As time went on their voices became more strident and less tempered. Terms like 'white settler' and 'colonialist' began to appear in every article that touched upon native issues always accompanied by a mention of residential schools. And no matter how many inquiries or commissions or amount of money handed out in order to bring some sense of reconciliation there was not a single word of gratitude. Rather it was complaint after complaint along with accusations of racism, genocide, ethnic cleansing and attempts to revise Canadian history.

And there is still no end in sight. No reconciliation. The MMWI drags on. The courts are still dealing with issues that address the Sixties Scoop and Residential Schools. Some reserves still resemble 3rd world communities - others flourish - and therein lies a question in the minds of many Canadians. Why aren't the wealthy reserves doing more to help their own people? Where are the role models, native volunteers, native doctors, lawyers, social workers, and other native professionals?

Change can't be forced. It must come from within. I hope to see it happen in my lifetime.

You need some balance in your understanding of native issues, Cliffy. Here are some excellent articles for your edification.

fcpp.org/2008/04/10/report-analysis-suggests-ways-to-improve-aboriginal-outcomes/

fcpp.org/2018/08/22/myth-versus-evidence-your-choice/
 
Ron in Regina
+4
#188
Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

That this thread exists tells me that white privilege does not want to deal with the reality of what was done or the lasting generational effects it is still reaping on our native population. You can't just "get over" 150 years of physical, sexual, mental and spiritual trauma.


That fact that any of us are here to read this thread tells me that almost every ancestor we all have had managed to get over thousands of years of physical, sexual, mental and spiritual trauma. Human history is conquered and conquering peoples. What people haven't been conquered by others?

Sorry, I just Googled and Nepal (supposedly) has never been conquered or occupied by another nation. I thought the Chinese had occupied Nepal but I guess I'm wrong there. Every other country has been occupied or conquered at least once for some time in the last 3000 years.
Last edited by Ron in Regina; Aug 29th, 2018 at 11:02 PM..
 
Danbones
+1
#189
Is not honoring treaties, while being full blown Rhodesianism, really considered conquering?

Way to go Mo!

I think you nailed it pretty good.

Think of how royalty began wearing beaver pelt hats and furs to get them in style, which gave them value, to finance the above.

Quote: Originally Posted by MHz View Post

Canada is always the 'bitch', we are as shallow as the ones we vote in. Good doggy, no go to your corner until called.


Are you really expecting an edited answer? Just askin, . . .

"My English coach was also my hockey teacher"

..precisely as advertised...how often does that happen in this day and age?
Last edited by Danbones; Aug 29th, 2018 at 11:33 PM..
 
Cliffy
+1
#190
 
JLM
+3
#191
Quote: Originally Posted by Mowich View Post

That this thread exists should tell you that many Canadians are simply fed-up with the apologies, the tears, the holidays, the virtue-signalling and continuing culture of victimhood. Forget your 'white privilege' bs, Cliffy. I have friends on the local reserve who have fallen out with other members of the community over what they see as the extreme activist element. This isn't a 'white' issue or a 'native' issue. This is an issue about a small percentage of a group of people - highly educated at that - who were delivered of an opportunity to advance their activist views when the Liberals were elected - and took full and total advantage of The Great Enabler's inability to understand the real consequences of his words and deeds. I actually credit them for a very skillful action plan. Their PR department alone deserves a lot of credit for ensuring a continuing presence in media broadcasts and publications.

Yet it is that very presence in media story after media story that began to work against them. As time went on their voices became more strident and less tempered. Terms like 'white settler' and 'colonialist' began to appear in every article that touched upon native issues always accompanied by a mention of residential schools. And no matter how many inquiries or commissions or amount of money handed out in order to bring some sense of reconciliation there was not a single word of gratitude. Rather it was complaint after complaint along with accusations of racism, genocide, ethnic cleansing and attempts to revise Canadian history.

And there is still no end in sight. No reconciliation. The MMWI drags on. The courts are still dealing with issues that address the Sixties Scoop and Residential Schools. Some reserves still resemble 3rd world communities - others flourish - and therein lies a question in the minds of many Canadians. Why aren't the wealthy reserves doing more to help their own people? Where are the role models, native volunteers, native doctors, lawyers, social workers, and other native professionals?

Change can't be forced. It must come from within. I hope to see it happen in my lifetime.

You need some balance in your understanding of native issues, Cliffy. Here are some excellent articles for your edification.

fcpp.org/2008/04/10/report-analysis-suggests-ways-to-improve-aboriginal-outcomes/

fcpp.org/2018/08/22/myth-versus-evidence-your-choice/


I agree, sometimes you have to suck it up and move on! When bad shit happens to you, you have to examine the situation and possibly make changes to your procedure. The cops should definitely have their knuckles rapped and get some more intensive training.
 
pgs
+3
#192
Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

That this thread exists tells me that white privilege does not want to deal with the reality of what was done or the lasting generational effects it is still reaping on our native population. You can't just "get over" 150 years of physical, sexual, mental and spiritual trauma.

What about our Asian and other ethnic minorities , is this their problem as well , or just a white problem ? What about those white Europeans who immigrated after WW2 is this their white problem as well ?

Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

I agree, sometimes you have to suck it up and move on! When bad shit happens to you, you have to examine the situation and possibly make changes to your procedure. The cops should definitely have their knuckles rapped and get some more intensive training.

My grandma got the strap in the residential school and I have been traumatized ever since .
 
DaSleeper
+3
#193
Quote: Originally Posted by pgs View Post

What about our Asian and other ethnic minorities , is this their problem as well , or just a white problem ? What about those white Europeans who immigrated after WW2 is this their white problem as well ?


My grandma got the strap in the residential school and I have been traumatized ever since .

I got the strap in primary school and it wasn't even a residential school..........

I got it because I was a baaad boy!
 
JLM
+2
#194
Quote: Originally Posted by DaSleeper View Post

I got the strap in primary school and it wasn't even a residential school..........

I got it because I was a baaad boy!


I can relate to that!

Quote: Originally Posted by pgs View Post


My grandma got the strap in the residential school and I have been traumatized ever since .




BECAUSE she got the strap? Never mind, I just woke up!
 
MHz
#195
If you abuse a single generation and send them back without any treatment to erase the bad effects you won't have to abuse the next generation as they will do it for you.

The abuse then throws up their hands and calls it incurable and the people are naturally stubborn and stupid. 100 years is how many generations in a row. Haiti was still under France's thumb for 250 years after they gained 'freedom from slavery'.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8u1zH...=RDcgJE-UY0a5o
 
Mowich
+5
#196
Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post


Suffering from short-term memory loss, Cliffy?

globalnews.ca/news/4193748/la-loche-school-shooting-saskatchewan-sentence/
 
EagleSmack
+1
#197
Quote: Originally Posted by Mowich View Post

Suffering from short-term memory loss, Cliffy?

globalnews.ca/news/4193748/la-loche-school-shooting-saskatchewan-sentence/


Do you think Cliff will respond?
 
Mowich
+1
#198
Quote: Originally Posted by EagleSmack View Post

Do you think Cliff will respond?


He's busy hunting up a meme on FB.
 
DaSleeper
+3
#199
Quote: Originally Posted by EagleSmack View Post

Do you think Cliff will respond?

Quote: Originally Posted by Mowich View Post

He's busy hunting up a meme on FB.


.

that's his only claim to fame

And I made sure everybody knows it!
 
Twin_Moose
+2
#200
I don't see any killing, torture or rape in those meme pictures, We all were bullied in school in one form or another, and if the reason of torture was to go to school and conform Hell where is my money?
 
taxslave
+2
#201
Quote: Originally Posted by White_Unifier View Post

If you think we don't have enough days off, then why not just increase the number of personal holidays allowed rather than force the whole country to take the same day off work?

That said, let me entertain you a bit. If the government should insist on a statutory holiday for the private sector too, then why not stagger it? For example, the Government could make both the first day of Spring and the first day of Summer commemorative days, with an employer being required to give an employee one of those two days off each year but not both.

Most likely, an employer would let employees choose but if they all choose the same day, then maybe let them choose by order of seniority in the company.

You do realize this would add significant costs to business and taxpayers don't you?
Let's look at the government part first. All employees that get the day off also get paid for that day so no savings there. And their work wouldn't get done. Now let's look at essential services. They also get paid for the stat plus double time for all hours worked.Just trippled the wage cost for that day.
Same goes for the private sector. Who is going to shut down for that day? Certainly not restaurants, bars and malls so all those people would have to be paid at least time and a half plus the stat. NO camp jobs are going to stop for the day so all those people get double time for the day plus the stat. And very few of us work less than ten hours a day.
THe upshot is a huge expense to recognize something that only affected a few thousand people, none of us had any control over and most didn't even know about the problems until the 80s.

Quote: Originally Posted by Mowich View Post

Suffering from short-term memory loss, Cliffy?

globalnews.ca/news/4193748/la-loche-school-shooting-saskatchewan-sentence/

Like all appoligists he has selective memory. Mostly selects bullshit.
 
White_Unifier
+1
#202
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

You do realize this would add significant costs to business and taxpayers don't you?
Let's look at the government part first. All employees that get the day off also get paid for that day so no savings there. And their work wouldn't get done. Now let's look at essential services. They also get paid for the stat plus double time for all hours worked.Just trippled the wage cost for that day.
Same goes for the private sector. Who is going to shut down for that day? Certainly not restaurants, bars and malls so all those people would have to be paid at least time and a half plus the stat. NO camp jobs are going to stop for the day so all those people get double time for the day plus the stat. And very few of us work less than ten hours a day.
THe upshot is a huge expense to recognize something that only affected a few thousand people, none of us had any control over and most didn't even know about the problems until the 80s.

Sorry for the misunderstanding. I was thinking unpaid days off and only for shift workers who normally work on the usual stat holidays. This would mean that rather than pay time and a half for example, an employer could give a shift worker an alternative day off from the list instead. Now that might make some shift workers angry that now the employer could just give him a different stat off instead rather than pay the time and a half.

However, other shift workers might actually appreciate it. It might mean less holiday pay but more opportunities to get time off with others to organize activities etc.

And to be clear, I'm not proposing the government spend money on those days, but just to give shift workers an opportunity to choose alternative days when they can get off with others if they want to organize events on their own dime.

Also just to clarify, if your employer gives you your allotted nine days off a year and makes you work on your other stat days, no, you would not get paid time and a half because that would not be your personal stat. In other words, as long as your employer gives you nine stat days off a year, he would have no need to pay you extra since the other days would just be regular work days for you.

to avoid confusion on all of this, I'm tempted to create a different thread to propose eliminating stat pay or at least limit it to strict conditions. If the government is to increase the number of state holidays, then it will need to limit the number of personal holidays, meaning that any additional public holiday other than his personal ones should be treated as just a regular work day for him.
 
taxslave
+2
#203
Quote: Originally Posted by White_Unifier View Post

Sorry for the misunderstanding. I was thinking unpaid days off and only for shift workers who normally work on the usual stat holidays. This would mean that rather than pay time and a half for example, an employer could give a shift worker an alternative day off from the list instead. Now that might make some shift workers angry that now the employer could just give him a different stat off instead rather than pay the time and a half.

However, other shift workers might actually appreciate it. It might mean less holiday pay but more opportunities to get time off with others to organize activities etc.

And to be clear, I'm not proposing the government spend money on those days, but just to give shift workers an opportunity to choose alternative days when they can get off with others if they want to organize events on their own dime.

Also just to clarify, if your employer gives you your allotted nine days off a year and makes you work on your other stat days, no, you would not get paid time and a half because that would not be your personal stat. In other words, as long as your employer gives you nine stat days off a year, he would have no need to pay you extra since the other days would just be regular work days for you.

to avoid confusion on all of this, I'm tempted to create a different thread to propose eliminating stat pay or at least limit it to strict conditions. If the government is to increase the number of state holidays, then it will need to limit the number of personal holidays, meaning that any additional public holiday other than his personal ones should be treated as just a regular work day for him.

Better read some Union contracts first. Especially the ones that relate to camp projects.
 
MHz
#204
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

You do realize this would add significant costs to business and taxpayers don't you?
Let's look at the government part first. All employees that get the day off also get paid for that day so no savings there. And their work wouldn't get done. Now let's look at essential services. They also get paid for the stat plus double time for all hours worked.Just trippled the wage cost for that day.

Make money and shelter an essential service where the public is invited to donate their time helping others fill out the forms needed. Grade1 required to be an instructor. As a .org it is run at cost and when it gets cheaper to run the clients costs also go down.



Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

Same goes for the private sector. Who is going to shut down for that day? Certainly not restaurants, bars and malls so all those people would have to be paid at least time and a half plus the stat. NO camp jobs are going to stop for the day so all those people get double time for the day plus the stat. And very few of us work less than ten hours a day.
THe upshot is a huge expense to recognize something that only affected a few thousand people, none of us had any control over and most didn't even know about the problems until the 80s.

Pay your respects wherever you are at 11:59:59AM-12PM, Dec:21.
 
White_Unifier
#205
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

Better read some Union contracts first. Especially the ones that relate to camp projects.

Not every worker is unionized. Obviously any union could negotiate what it wants and any employer can sign what it wants.

That said, I do support US-style right-to-work legislation to keep the power of unions in check.

If a government adds more state holidays, it could even specify in the bill that it will not affect already-signed union contracts. In other words, if Unions then want the additional stat covered in their contracts, it would be up to them to renegotiate. Thin of it as a grandfather clause for businesses.
 
Ron in Regina
+3
#206
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

I agree, sometimes you have to suck it up and move on! When bad shit happens to you, you have to examine the situation and possibly make changes to your procedure. The cops should definitely have their knuckles rapped and get some more intensive training.

I agree with you. Being a victim is a circumstantial thing that sucks but it passes. Remaining a victim is a choice. Generations later using that fact that Grandma was a victim is a cop out.

My Great-Grandfather left England with his three brothers on an involuntary one way cruise for Australia. Several years later when Britain was having a tiff with some South African Farmers an opportunity arose to leave Australia if they agreed to go fight for King and Country (that threw them out of their own country never to return). Two brothers (one being my Great-Grandfather) decided to go fight and two decided to stay in Australia.

After the Boer War, the two brothers were granted leave from Australia to anywhere in the Commonwealth (except England)....and chose Canada, and 120yrs later should I choose to be a victim? Oh woe is me and a couple of boo-hoo's? Thank you but pass. To busy working and living a good life.
Last edited by Ron in Regina; Aug 31st, 2018 at 10:09 PM..Reason: spacing
 
Mowich
+3
#207
Quote: Originally Posted by Ron in Regina View Post

I agree with you. Being a victim is a circumstantial thing that sucks but it passes. Remaining a victim is a choice. Generations later using that fact that Grandma was a victim is a cop out.

My Great-Grandfather left England with his three brothers on an involuntary one way cruise for Australia. Several years later when Britain was having a tiff with some South African Farmers an opportunity arose to leave Australia if they agreed to go fight for King and Country (that threw them out of their own country never to return). Two brothers (one being my Great-Grandfather) decided to go fight and two decided to stay in Australia.

After the Boer War, the two brothers were granted leave from Australia to anywhere in the Commonwealth (except England)....and chose Canada, and 120yrs later should I choose to be a victim? Oh woe is me and a couple of boo-hoo's? Thank you but pass. To busy working and living a good life.


Thank you for sharing your family history, Ron. I could not agree with you more about victimhood being a choice. I might go further and suggest that it is now fast on the edge of becoming an occupation.
 
Twin_Moose
+1
#208
How a proposed holiday for reconciliation could affect Canada's economy

Quote:

The Conservative Party's Indigenous affairs critic says the government's plan to create a holiday to mark the tragic legacy of the residential school system would be a financial burden for Canada.
"I do know that we have to move toward reconciliation," Kamloops-Thompson-Cariboo MP Cathy McLeod told Daybreak Kamloops guest host Doug Herbert on Thursday. "Surely ... there is a way we could move forward and not spend $195 million of federal government taxpayers' dollars, which I think could be used for much better purpose."

Federal payroll concerns

The federal government's daily payroll is $195 million, according to McLeod, and employees receive full pay for statutory holidays.
That much money could pay for "an awful lot of clean water systems ... an awful lot of support for education," says McLeod.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said last month his government would establish a new holiday to fulfil a recommendation of the Truth and Reconcilation Commission, but provided no details.
Chief Robert Joseph, ambassador for Reconciliation Canada, told the CBC that having a federal Indigenous holiday is worth the money.
"Whatever it is that we sacrifice ... moving forward together in reconciliation and celebration is worth the investment given the gravity of the history we're talking about and the consequences that still reverberate through our communities as a result of the impacts of that period," says Joseph.

Transitioning to federal status

June 21 is already set aside as National Indigenous Peoples Day, but Joseph says it's mainly recognized in Indigenous communities.
"It had a big roll-out and Canadians took an interest," says Joseph. "But over a little bit of time, the only ones that were celebrating were Aboriginal people. This next step elevates our desire to be one with each other."
Once a new statutory holiday is implemented, Indigenous communities could use the day to communicate with Canadian politicians, says Joseph.
"During that day, it would be so important for MPs to get out into their constituencies and spend the day in the Aboriginal community, meeting Aboriginal people."


Business concerns

Once the federal government declares a new statutory holiday, it's up to provinces to decide whether to follow suit.
Having a day to recognize reconciliation is important, says Dan Kelly, president of the Canadian Federation of Independent Business, adding that his members want to address the unfair treatment of Indigenous peoples.
But he would prefer to see a new holiday replace to an existing one rather than create a new paid day off for Canadians. The August Long Weekend or Family Day could be repurposed to recognize reconciliation efforts, he says.
"We have already started to hear from small-, medium-sized firms who are concerned that their provincial government may follow the lead of the federal government. Then they would be facing an additional cost," says Kelly.
The vast majority of private-sector workers are provincially regulated, says Kelly. If a new statutory holiday were to be recognized provincially, the CFIB estimates it would cost $3.6 billion in lost productivity countrywide.
"I think there's a way to do this without significant economic consequences."

 
White_Unifier
#209
National Indigenous Peoples Day need not be an economic burden if implemented the right way. Right now, the Federal Government has 9 statutory holidays. It could ass National Indigenous Peoples Day as a state holiday but make a legal distinction between a public holiday and a personal statutory holiday whereby the law could declare that the Federal government has 10 official public holidays of which a worker can choose nine per year in consultation with his employer as his statutory personal holidays. By making a distinction between legal public holidays and legal statutory personal holidays, the state then becomes free to adopt as many public holidays as it wants (even one for every day of the year if it wants to) while still capping statutory personal holidays to nine.

Problem solved.
 
Mowich
+1
#210
Quote: Originally Posted by Twin_Moose View Post

How a proposed holiday for reconciliation could affect Canada's economy

Cathy is the MP for our constituency. She was first elected in 2008 and has retained her seat in subsequent elections. I've met her several times as she has an office in 100 Mile House and attends several events during the year. Her points about the government costs alone should this stat become law are valid and worth considering.

"Chief Robert Joseph, ambassador for Reconciliation Canada, told the CBC that having a federal Indigenous holiday is worth the money. "Whatever it is that we sacrifice ... moving forward together in reconciliation and celebration is worth the investment given the gravity of the history we're talking about and the consequences that still reverberate through our communities as a result of the impacts of that period," says Joseph."

If this is the 'ambassadors' best go at reconciling differences, he needs to go have a deep think.