The Coming Police State


mrmom2
#1
I called it and here it comes Kiddies are your ready for camera's everywhere ?Are you ready for a national ID card? by the way soon as we all have them heres another prediction for you .There going to tax us through those cards .Everything you do everywhere you go you'll need your card All in the name of making us feel safer What a F cking JokeREad this article carefully thats exactly what there talking about All you naysayers keep your heads in the sand do nothing say nothing us cospiracy theoryists will stand up for your rights :P
 
Reverend Blair
#2
It reminds me a lot of that old Kinks song..."Here come the people in grey, to take me away..."

I have no intention of carrying one of those internal passports they are gearing up for. What are they going to do, deport me?
 
Twila
#3
I guess we're suppose to buy copious amounts of tuck tape and poly then?

Or should we start digging bomb shelters?

Or should we do what we've been told to do? Not let the terrorists win and go about our business like normal?

What are we (individuals) suppose to do and why does he lambaste us rather then give us options?
 
Reverend Blair
#4
I have a whole roll of poly here. Several tubes of acoustic sealant too. I will have an air-tight vapour barrier. I hate cold rooms.
 
Twila
#5
Quote:

I will have an air-tight vapour barrier.

Sounds like your prepared....the terrorists won't get to kill you.....although lack of air might do you in.....
 
manda
#6
You know, it's not that I'm cocky, thinking that Canada will never be attacked...but why would anyone want to? Are they desperate to get their hands on our mad Cow or potato bilght? Perhaps they want to attack a government that is already functioning poorly. maybe because we hate Bush? Not unless we're going to be attacked by Americans . Really, nothing else is really said about Canada in the national news, so really what would be the point of attacking Canada?
 
Reverend Blair
#7
Quote:

Sounds like your prepared....the terrorists won't get to kill you.....although lack of air might do you in.....

I'm not worried about the terrorists, Twila...I'm worried about getting cold in January. If terrorists attack Transcona, then so be it. I will be warm and my heating bills will be low.
 
mrmom2
#8
Don't worry about the So called terrorists Twinks worry about the politicians that tell you what there going to do about the terrorists there the ones you got to worry about .They tell you take this ID card say no ,If just 10% of us say no thay can't take our rights away .Get invovled write your Mp; and demand what his or hers take on this is .We are going to have a election very soon and find out about who's going to do what .Exercise your democracy before you don't have it anymore .Tell people about what there doing Just getting the info out works wonders
 
mrmom2
#9
Hey Rev whats the NDP's take on all this .I would bet they would get a lot of votes if they put forward the right answers on this
 
Reverend Blair
#10
That does work wonders, Mr. Mom. Let everybody know. Oh, and pay cash for whatever you can.
 
mrmom2
#11
I pay with nothing but cash You should see the looks i get from bank tellars when I cash my check and take all the cash.Its a look of utter belief that quickly turns to suspicion
 
manda
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by mrmom2

Don't worry about the So called terrorists Twinks worry about the politicians that tell you what there going to do about the terrorists there the ones you got to worry about .They tell you take this ID card say no ,If just 10% of us say no thay can't take our rights away .Get invovled write your Mp; and demand what his or hers take on this is .We are going to have a election very soon and find out about who's going to do what .Exercise your democracy before you don't have it anymore .Tell people about what there doing Just getting the info out works wonders

I haven't really heard much about this ID card, has my head been stuck in the sand?
 
mrmom2
#13
Genesis of an American Gestapo

Tyrants have always some slight shade of virtue; they support the laws before destroying them.”

-- Voltaire


“A dictatorship would be a heck-of a lot easier; as long as I’m dictator.”

-- President George W. Bush


Tyranny has very few indispensable parts: a compliant media that will regulate information to meet the goals of the state; a “rubber-stamp” Parliament that will endorse the policies of the supreme leader; a judiciary that will adjust the law to serve the requirements of the ruling body, a strong military to seize the wealth of weaker nations; and a security apparatus, that will eliminate any domestic threats to the system.

On June 29 President Bush took the great leap forward in transforming the nation’s intelligence services by ordering a restructuring of the FBI and putting “a broad swath of the agency” under the direct control of the executive.

Bingo -- Bush’s personal secret police: an American Gestapo.

The formation of the new agency was presented as part of 74 recommendations made by the 9-11 Commission on Intelligence. Every member of the so-called “independent” panel was handpicked by the Bush team, and their proposals reflect the narrow interests of American elites. Bush loyalists and Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) members Lawrence Silberman and Charles Robb, (both of whom were directly involved in the 9-11 whitewash) chaired the committee, and provided the rationale for the dramatic changes to the existing system. Astonishingly, Bush was able to unilaterally create the National Security Service without congressional approval as part of his sweeping powers under the new anti-terror legislation.

The freshly minted National Security Service, which has been dubbed the New SS, will operate under the authority of former ambassador to Iraq, John Negroponte, whose involvement in overseeing the terrorist activities of death squads in Nicaragua will provide him with the necessary experience for his new task. Negroponte, the new Intelligence czar, will report directly to the President, who in turn will carefully monitor the violations of civil liberties that will naturally evolve from unsupervised investigations.

The formation of the Bush Gestapo overturns long held precedents for maintaining the independence of law enforcement agencies. Those guidelines have been summarily discarded by the administration, just as they have been ignored by the collaborative media. The nation’s steep descent into despotism was barely greeted with a whimper of protest from the mainstream press. The editors of The New York Times applauded the changes as a sign of progress, a step forward in making America safer and “breaking down walls” between foreign and domestic agencies. This is true; there are many cumbersome “barriers” between the President and absolute power but, for all practical purposes, those have now been effectively removed. Notwithstanding the NY Times’ perky assessment, the deleterious effects on the American people will be felt for decades to come.

In a Washington Post article innocuously titled “Bush Approves Spy Agency Changes,” veteran journalist Walter Pincus makes scant reference to the many civil liberties groups that fought the creation of the National SS. Timothy Edgar, from the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), criticized the president’s action saying, “The FBI is effectively being taken over by a spymaster who reports directly to the White House. . . . It's alarming that the same person who oversees foreign spying will now oversee domestic spying, too.”

“Alarming” to whom? It’s not alarming to the president or his cadre of corporate benefactors who would rather eschew the nettlesome requirements of the Bill of Rights to eliminate potential dangers to the state. To them, the emergence of the secret police augers stability in the markets, eliminating disruptive elements without recourse to the law. Personal freedom is the sworn enemy of “top-down”, orderly societies. The Bush Gestapo will ensure that the decision-making power continues to be entrusted by those who’ve demonstrated their natural right to lead.

The National Security Service will have unlimited power to conduct the apocryphal war on terror anyway it sees fit. The agency will operate independent of congressional oversight and beyond the bothersome glare of America’s permanently embedded media. It will provide the requisite muscle for maintaining America’s one-party system; spying, harassing and intimidating those dissident elements that dare to challenge the status quo. We should expect to see an up tick in dirty tricks, coerced censorship and “disappeared” persons in the wake of the new changes.

General Michael Hayden, deputy director of National Intelligence, attempted to assuage fears that civil liberties would be savaged by the Bush brown shirts. Hayden stated unequivocally that the US no longer had the “luxury” of maintaining the divisions between foreign and domestic intelligence structures because, “Our enemy does not recognize that distinction.” In other words, it’s too dangerous to be free any longer.

Isn’t this the unavoidable logic of Fascism?

The creation of the National Security Service comes on the heels of other developments that are equally ominous. Homeland Security’s Michael Chertoff announced this week that the 180,000 public employees in the government’s largest agency would be further corralled under the central authority of the president. Invoking the pretext of “national security,” Chertoff plans to appoint a few new agency chieftains (Bush loyalists) who will be tasked at consolidating the disparate groups under a model of corporate rule. The changes represent even more power for the president.

Similarly, the release of a 40-page document from the Defense Department states the intention of the Pentagon to “expand military activity” within the United States, a practice that has been banned since 1878 under the provisions of the Posse Comitatus Act. Americans would be surprised to know that the administration is maneuvering to sidestep the existing law and deploy troops inside the country on the president’s orders. Consider, for a moment, the potential for disaster if Bush is allowed to use the military as his own private resource: dispatching protestors, patrolling cities and supervising elections as happens in third world nations. The Pentagon document clearly “asserts the president’s authority to deploy combat forces on US territory to intercept and defeat threats.” (Washington Post)

Sounds like a military dictatorship to me.

Is there any doubt where all of this is heading?

The National Security Service, which is an autonomous, domestic spy-agency, signals a tectonic shift in the political landscape. The genesis of the Police State marks the end of American democracy, the final wooden stake to the heart of privacy, security and personal liberty. Bush’s meteoric rise to power has been accompanied by a breakdown of traditional safeguards at every juncture, leaving the system vulnerable to incalculable damage. The message to citizens is clear: all of the institutions upon which democratic societies depend (the executive, the Congress, the Judiciary, the media, the military, and law enforcement) have withered beneath the Bush onslaught and been reduced to rubble. The entire system has been corrupted from top to bottom. America is a gaunt, skeletal figure, rattling around in its cage, ready to be blown over by the first brisk wind. Democracy is dead.

Now, will someone please tell the American people?
 
mrmom2
#14
manda the reason you have not heard about a national ID here is the goverment is keeping it very quiet .A couple of years ago a Liberal cabinet member came out in public with the idea of one for us .Letters of protest poured in so they've shut up about it for now .They need a terrorist incedent to push something like that through here.So now there going to manufacture one I would bet money on it Thats what all this were next were next stuff is all about.And I will bet there will be a drill going on in the same area where it occurs
 
manda
#15
ah, I plan on going to law school, I'll fight it. The government doesn't need any added way to track my whereabouts. If I'm leaving the country, I'll use a passport...that reminds me, i should get my dual citizenship soon, but, I ramble
 
Jo Canadian
#16
An 11-year-old girl who threw a stone at a group of boys pelting her with water balloons is being prosecuted on serious assault charges in California.

Maribel Cuevas was arrested in April in a police operation which involved three police cars and a helicopter. She has since spent five days in detention, in which she was granted one 30 minute visit by her parents, and has spent a month under house arrest.
Her lawyer accuses the authorities of criminalising childhood behaviour. "They're treating her like a violent parole offender," Richard Beshwate said. "It's not a felony, it's an 11-year-old acting like an 11-year-old." more..
 
Twila
#17
Felony conviction at 11 for throwing a rock?

Yikes!
 
Andygal
#18
assault charges for defending herself? Really?
 
Jo Canadian
#19
Man. Those cops would have a heyday up north. Every child there would be a convicted felon by the age of 5.

Rock throwing (At least in the communities I was in) were the main souce of conflict resolution until the kids were about 11-13 when they were big enuogh to smash the person pissing them off.
 
manda
#20
15 you say? try 9

My oldest would have been convicted of something by now 8 0
 
Gertrood
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by manda

You know, it's not that I'm cocky, thinking that Canada will never be attacked...but why would anyone want to? Are they desperate to get their hands on our mad Cow or potato bilght? Perhaps they want to attack a government that is already functioning poorly. maybe because we hate Bush? Not unless we're going to be attacked by Americans . Really, nothing else is really said about Canada in the national news, so really what would be the point of attacking Canada?

Exactly. We are friendlies, supporters and hate the same countries.
They will never attack us.
 
Gertrood
#22
Quote:

We responded. We determined a felony assault had taken place and the officers took the actions that were necessary," said Fresno Police Sergeant Anthony Martinez.

Another police officer told ABC News that the girl, when asked what she thought would happen if she threw the stone, replied that it would make him "bleed".

The police had no business doing their duty even if it nipped a ethnic riot in the bud.
 
no1important
#23
She could not be charged in Canada as she is only 11. Actually if she was up here and shot them she could not be charged.
 
peapod
#24
The police had no business doing their duty even if it nipped a ethnic riot in the bud.

Gee let me guess...an neo con
 
mrmom2
#25
Heres a police state document
 
jjw1965
#26
I agree with mrmom2 100%, Living in Ohio I have already seen the rise of the police state here, cameras are everywhere, and now our house just passed to make the wonderful 'Patriot Act' pemanent. so they will be able to do what ever they want.
 
I think not
#27
If you are really that concerned of the police state I suggest you become a member of the ACLU, if you are not already, and get updates on the Patriot Act and what constitutes a police state.
 
mrmom2
#28
Coming to a road near you ?


RFID tags along to track your vehicle

The Financial Express | July 25 2005

Radio frequency identification (RFID) technology, so far confined to warehouse tracking and other small-area applications, is now put in conjunction with VSATs to track vehicles. This new system, developed by Core Projects and Technologies Ltd, is the latest to hit the Indian vehicle tracking market, where card- swiping and GSM-based equipment are the norm.

The company launched a vehicle tracking pilot project on the Delhi-Jaipur highway last week.

Sanjeev Mansotra, chairman of the company, says, RFID grids have been placed along with VSAT terminals at four places at an approximate equi-distance of 50 km. The RSRTC passenger buses moving between Delhi and Jaipur have been fitted with RFID transponders (tags), whereby their movement is tracked, monitored and managed. Each vehicle has been designated a unique ID. Monitoring is done and updated every half-an-hour, as the vehicle moves along the highway.

The system uses different instruments such as bar-codes, RFID tags, Bluetooth, web cams, etc, for capturing the data. The data is then transferred through various mediums such as VSATs, optic-fibre, GPRS, etc, to the control centre. The registered user can log on to the system through internet and can view the current status of the vehicle. The user can generate an HTML report or even ask for a video feed from the web cams fixed at different places along the highway.

Industry analysts say, the current Indian logistics tracking sector is “non-structured and single dimensional”. The IT logistics sector for tracking people, assets and vehicles is expected to be a Rs 500 crore industry over the next 2-3 years.

With the cost of an RFID tag between Rs 2,000-25,000 each, Core Projects says that large scale logistics companies wouldn’t mind the expenditure incurred for a highly effective vehicle monitoring, managing and tracking system. Emphasising on the project’s technical competency, the company says that RFID tags and other data capture tools can be placed on to the individual consignments as well. This would help immensely in inventory management.

According to Prakash Salkar, CEO of the company, the VSAT-based networks would be vital plug-ins while designing a pan-India footprint for a logistics grid. This would especially be an effective solution in regions where other technology options like GSM circles would be unavailable.
 
mrmom2
#29
 
peapod
#30
 

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