Queen Appoints Nick Clegg as Deputy Prime Minister


FiveParadox
Liberal
#1
Today Her Majesty The Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland , on the advice of The Right Honourable David Cameron P.C. , M.P. ( Witney ), the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom , appointed The Right Honourable Nick Clegg P.C. , M.P. ( Sheffield Hallam ) as the Deputy Prime Minister of the United Kingdom (a position that has been vacant for nearly three years).

I guess that answers most questions that had been flying around, in regards to how this coalition government would be brought together; the Liberal Democratic Party of the United Kingdom is indeed going to be contributing at the Cabinet table. This is a time when many Canadian politicians and constitutional scholars are likely to be watching United Kingdom politics very closely; the way that this coalition government is handled could very well help to spell out how a similar situation in Canada could play out in the future. After all, even today our own Parliament of Canada continues to look to its United Kingdom counterpart when we canít discern any precedents to draw upon.
 
darkbeaver
Republican
#2
meet the new boss same as the old boss-------they got fooled again
 
Icarus27k
#3
Holy hell. There's a DEPUTY Prime Minister?
 
FiveParadox
Liberal
#4
Canada sometimes has a deputy prime minister, as well; it isn’t a position that comes with any inherent constitutional authority, nor does it even accord the officeholder with a higher precedence than other ministers. Normally it is combined with another full portfolio (since the deputy prime minister has no real ministerial responsibilities other than standing in for the prime minister in question period).
 
Blackleaf
#5
Nick Clegg becomes Britain's first Deputy Prime Minister since John Prescott stepped down in 2007, and the first Liberal one for decades. It's not necessary that Britain has a Deputy Pm. He'll just run the country whenever David Cameron is abroad attending summits or meeting PMs and Presidents, and he'll do so later this year when Cameron takes paternity leave. But he still has the job of leader of the Liberal Democrats.

This is the first coalition government to come into power in Britain since 1940. That's as a result of Britain's first hung parliament - in which no party gets an outright majority - since 1974.

Back then, the Conservative government, led by Prime Minister Edward Heath, won a larger share of the votes (but only just) than Harold Wilson's Labour Party (37.9% to 37.2%) but Labour won more seats in the Commons than the Tories (301 to 297). The Liberals (once known as the Whigs), led by Jeremy Thorpe won 19.3% of the vote and 14 seats.

So the Tory government tried to form a coalition government with the Liberals. However, Thorpe was never enthusiastic about supporting the Conservatives, and demanded major electoral reforms in exchange for such an agreement (just as they have done in forging an agreement with the Tories this time).

Unwilling to accept such terms, Heath resigned and Wilson returned for his second spell as Prime Minister. However, Wilson only lasted until 1976 and then James Callaghan took over as PM. His disastrous reign oversaw strikes and the 1978/79 Winter of Discontent. Needless to say, he was soundly beaten by Margaret Thatcher in the 1979 election, who went on to serve 11 years as PM, winning three General Election.

However, the 2010 election wasn't as close, with the Tories gaining two million more voted than Labour and 50 more seats than Labour. It seems as though the British people wanted a Tory Government but a hung parliament came along entirely accidentally. During the campaign, Lid Dem leader Nick Clegg thought it would be democratic if he first tried to help the party which won most seats and most votes to form a government, which was the Tories. They did speak to the Labour Party during the five days of negotiations but apparently Labour weren't that interested, knowing that it'll be much more difficult for them to form an alliance.

What we are seeing now is very strange times in British politics, with a coalition ruling over us for the first time since WWII. However, Churchill's coalition had no Liberal Party MPs in it, so this is the first time that Britain has been ruled by the Liberals since 1922.

David Cameron has also become the youngest British Prime Minister since Lord Liverpool in 1812. He's six months younger than what even Blair was when he came to power in 1997.

And we've got minor royalty in Downing Street. Cameron is the direct descendant of the eccentric King William IV (Queen Victoria's uncle) and his wife Samantha is a direct descendant of "merrie monarch" King Charles II and his mistress, the actress and orange seller Nell Gwyn.

And I bet that Liberal leader Nick Clegg didn't think that after this year's General Election that we would become Deputy Prime Minister. Anyone who thought that would have been locked up in Broadmoor.

Today Britain's two new leaders held a press conference in 10 Downing Street's beautiful garden. Though it was strange to see the men acting like good buddies when they used slag each other off in the Commons every week and also during the three televised Leaders' Debates during the campaign. A couple of years ago, Cameron was asked what his favourite joke was. He replied: "Nick Clegg."


New deal: Prime Minister David Cameron (right) and Deputy Prime MinisterNick Clegg in the Downing Street garden today on their first day in office


Partnership: The new Prime Minister and his deputy stroll across the lawn towards the waiting media
Last edited by Blackleaf; May 12th, 2010 at 10:24 AM..
 
Avro
No Party Affiliation
#6
Well, I think I will print this news out, place it in an envelope and mail it to never.

Because that's when I will give a crap.
 
Machjo
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by FiveParadox View Post

Today Her Majesty The Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland , on the advice of The Right Honourable David Cameron P.C. , M.P. ( Witney ), the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom , appointed The Right Honourable Nick Clegg P.C. , M.P. ( Sheffield Hallam ) as the Deputy Prime Minister of the United Kingdom (a position that has been vacant for nearly three years).

I guess that answers most questions that had been flying around, in regards to how this coalition government would be brought together; the Liberal Democratic Party of the United Kingdom is indeed going to be contributing at the Cabinet table. This is a time when many Canadian politicians and constitutional scholars are likely to be watching United Kingdom politics very closely; the way that this coalition government is handled could very well help to spell out how a similar situation in Canada could play out in the future. After all, even today our own Parliament of Canada continues to look to its United Kingdom counterpart when we canít discern any precedents to draw upon.

I remember when Parliament was pirogied... sorry, I meant prorogued, I can't remember if I'd suggested it or read it from someone else, but the idea seemed sound:

Next time, the governor General should invite whatever MP can get a majority of Parliamentarians behind him to form the government, or alternatively (thought this would be more difficult initially but would have the advantage of removing partisanship) have parliament vote in Cabinet members.

Since the second option would be more difficult to implement, I'll focus here on the former, and that was the one most discussed at the time it seemed. Had that occurred, the Governor General would have invited all the parties to establish a majority coalition, and the first such coalition to form could then approach her to form a government. Had that occurred last election, a stable government would have been in place from the start, thus avoiding any problems of confidence, prorogation, and minority rule. Clearly in a democracy, it ought to be the majority and not minority that rules. Even in British newspapers of the time, even some conservative ones, criticized harper's style as too confrontational. And that coming from those papers that were most likely to be in his favour. And i agree, he's way too partisan and confrontational a politician to truly make Parliament work.