Radiohead: In Rainbows

Blackleaf
#1
Oxfordshire supergroup Radiohead were formed in 1986. On 7th October they released their seventh studio album - In Rainbows - as an MP3 download and is scheduled to be released on 3rd December as a "discbox" with a second CD of additional material. The band are to finalise a record deal sometime in early October, and In Rainbows will most likely be released as a standard CD in January 2008.

Radiohead's In Rainbows: first review


By Robert Sandall
09/10/2007
The Telegraph


Robert Sandall finds that Radiohead do not put a foot wrong with their new album ‘In Rainbows’



Thom Yorke – vocals, rhythm guitar, piano, electronics
Jonny Greenwood - lead guitar, ondes martenot, keyboards, electronics, sound effects, percussion
Ed O'Brien – guitar, backing vocals, keyboards, percussion, effects pedals
Colin Greenwood – bass, synthesizers, electronics
Phil Selway – drums, percussion, live backing vocals

Not since 1998 when Oasis delivered Be Here Now, their feverishly anticipated sequel to What’s The Story (Morning Glory), has a rock album generated as much heat ahead of its release as Radiohead’s In Rainbows.

The fuss over the past week has centred on the band’s decision to offer it, in the first instance, as an MP3 download from their own website for which fans can choose to pay whatever they like. But this was only the last drama in a saga which has rumbled on for the best part of three years. Out of contract with their old label Parlophone in 2003 after finishing Hail To The Thief, and with only themselves now to please, Radiohead have dallied over In Rainbows like no other record in their 16 year career.


Radiohead: what are they worth?


On the face of it, this is not good news. Extended, unsupervised periods in the recording studio are notoriously bad for rock bands and tend to result in overblown stillborns like Fleetwood Mac’s cocaine opus, Tusk, and the inconsequential doodlings which dominate the Stone Roses’ sadly mistitled Second Coming.

But in Radiohead’s case, the delays and the false starts have had a happy ending.

Maybe it was a good thing that Jonny Greenwood, who was appointed the BBC Concert Orchestra’s composer in residence in 2004, was distracted by his first commission (Super Het Receiver) when the band began work on their seventh album in early 2005. Thom Yorke’s abrupt departure later that year to work on a solo album clearly didn’t do any harm either. Perhaps it was the very fact that their two most restlessly experimental members have been able to let off steam away from Radiohead that meant that when the band finally re-convened last year they set about recording their most straightforwardly enjoyable album since OK Computer.

Here, back at last, is the magic ingredient that has been lacking, or at least hiding on Radiohead records ever since a highly disgruntled Thom Yorke came off the road exhausted in 1999 and announced that he had "had it with melody". What a sad day that was, coming from the man who dreamed up Fake Plastic Trees and Karma Police, to name but two of the sublimely original tunes which turned Radiohead into a much loved, multi-million selling global draw. Say what you like about Kid A, Amnesiac and Hail To The Thief – and there is much that can be said, for and against - none of the group’s 21st century offerings boasts a melody that can hold a candle, let alone a lofted cigarette lighter, to the best of Radiohead in the 1990s.

Though In Rainbows puts that to rights, it takes its time to show its full hand. The opening track Step 15 finds Yorke doing his impersonation of a ghostly choirboy over a mildly autistic, Kid A flavoured, hip-hop beat. Bodysnatchers continues in a vein familiar to fans of the band’s recent work, with a fuzzed guitar riff having a fight with a competing time signature from the rhythm section while Yorke wails over the top. Everything changes with track three, Nude, a song that sounds like a classic old soul ballad with some slightly strange sonic edges. This reminds you instantly of the wide screen, emotionally coloured splendour that Radiohead used to evoke on a regular basis before the urge to unsettle listeners usurped the desire to offer them something more cathartic.

In Rainbows doesn’t really put a foot wrong from then on in. The band can’t resist a dash of dissonance and random distortion here and there, but then again they wouldn’t still be Radiohead if they had edited that out of the mix; and for every nod to weirdness for its own sake there is a string arrangement that is more up George Martin’s street than Messaien’s.

Likewise a few of Thom Yorke’s lines still retain that truculently tetchy, undergraduate air, particularly when he starts bemoaning the "collapsing infrastructure" on House Of Cards; but Yorke has never written a more direct love song than the bell-strewn All I Need, or penned a catchier singalong anthem than Jigsaw Falling Into Place. Radiohead aren’t obviously trying to reclaim ground they surrendered after their world conquest with OK Computer: their guitar arrangements here tend to favour acoustic strums and delicate arpeggios rather than the thunderous twang of old. They’ve done epic, for the time being anyway.

For all that, their seventh album sits far closer to their third than it does to their sixth. With a less unconventional outfit you would have to call In Rainbows a return to form. With Radiohead it feels more like the band have finally solved a problem that only they would ever have thought needed solving in the first place.

Track listing
  1. "15 Step" – 3:57
  2. "Bodysnatchers" – 4:02
  3. "Nude" – 4:15
  4. "Weird Fishes/Arpeggi" – 5:18
  5. "All I Need" – 3:48
  6. "Faust Arp" – 2:09
  7. "Reckoner" – 4:50
  8. "House of Cards" – 5:28
  9. "Jigsaw Falling into Place" – 4:09
  10. "Videotape" – 4:39
The discbox release of the album includes a second disc in Enhanced CD form, which contains eight additional tracks, along with digital photographs and artwork:
  1. "MK 1"
  2. "Down Is the New Up"
  3. "Go Slowly"
  4. "MK 2"
  5. "Last Flowers"
  6. "Up on the Ladder"
  7. "Bangers and Mash"
  8. "4 Minute Warning"
telegraph.co.uk
 
missile
#2
I thought they were taking a big risk with the ' pay whatever you think the music is worth" deal but noticed they've grossed roughly 9 million dollars so far.Good for them
 
Tonington
#3
Latest estimates I saw put them at 1.2 million albums sold.
 
scoobydude
#4
this seems like a future trend for artists...i heard Trent Reznor from Nine Inch Nails is also releasing an album in a similar way
 
spaminator
#5
Unreasonable delay arguments brought in Radiohead stage collapse case
THE CANADIAN PRESS
First posted: Monday, August 21, 2017 01:24 PM EDT | Updated: Monday, August 21, 2017 01:28 PM EDT
TORONTO - Lawyers for an entertainment company and an engineer accused in a deadly 2012 stage collapse at an outdoor Radiohead concert in Toronto are asking an Ontario court to stay the charges against them.
The entertainment company Live Nation and an engineer, Domenic Cugliari, are arguing the case has seen unreasonable delays that violate their right to a timely trial.
A Toronto-area contractor also charged in the incident, Optex Staging, has not applied for a stay but the judge has agreed that the company will share Live Nation’s fate on this issue.
A new trial was ordered in the case earlier this year after the presiding judge was appointed to a higher court and ruled he no longer had jurisdiction over the case.
Live Nation, Optex Staging and Cugliari were charged in 2013 with a total of 13 charges under the provincial Occupational Health and Safety Act.
If Monday’s unreasonable delay application is unsuccessful, a new trial is scheduled to begin Sept. 5.
Unreasonable delay arguments brought in Radiohead stage collapse case | Toronto
 
spaminator
#6
Charges in Toronto Radiohead stage collapse stayed over trial delays
The Canadian Press
First posted: Tuesday, September 05, 2017 10:29 AM EDT | Updated: Tuesday, September 05, 2017 01:01 PM EDT
TORONTO - Charges stemming from a fatal Radiohead concert stage collapse in 2012 were stayed Tuesday when a judge ruled the justice system had failed in allowing the case to take far too long to come to trial.
The inordinate delays, Ontario court Judge Ann Nelson ruled, had violated the rights of those charged to a timely hearing.
“This case was a complex case that required more time than other cases in the system,” Nelson said in her 21-page judgment. “After allowing for all of the exceptional circumstances that were in play, this case still will have taken too long to complete.”
The Supreme Court of Canada, Nelson noted, had set a presumptive ceiling of 18 months for proceedings in provincial courts, and this case — which would have taken almost five years to complete if it had gone to a second trial — would have lasted three times longer than that limit.
The case arose June 16, 2012, just hours before the British band Radiohead were due to perform in the north end of Toronto when part of the massive stage structure crashed down. Scott Johnson, 33, a British drum technician, was killed. Three others were injured.
A year later, entertainment company Live Nation and Domenic Cugliari, an engineer, and contractor Optex Staging were charged with a total of 13 offences under provincial health and safety laws.
In the spring, with the case set to wrap up after 40 trial days scattered over 14 months, the presiding judge, Shaun Nakatsuru, declared he had lost jurisdiction given his appointment to a higher court. That decision led to a senior justice declaring a mistrial in May, and a new hearing was set to begin Monday and wrap in May.
However, lawyers for Live Nation and Cugliari argued before Nelson last month for a stay in light of the delays. The parties agreed her ruling would also apply to Optex.
“It is important to emphasize that timely justice is not just important to persons facing charges,” Nelson said in her ruling. “It is also important to our society at large.”
A stay is a remedy of last resort given that it signals a “failure on the part of the administration of justice,” Nelson said.
The judge acknowledged her ruling would have a “negative impact” on the victims of the stage collapse, especially on Johnson’s family.
“No doubt, this decision will be incomprehensible to Mr. Johnson’s family, who can justifiably complain that justice has not been done,” Nelson said.
Neither Johnson’s father, Ken Johnson, who works for a scaffolding safety association in the U.K., and has attended some of the previous hearings, nor Live Nation, which has called what happened a “tragic incident,” was immediately available to comment Monday. However, Live Nation’s lawyer acknowledged the ruling would be “brutal” for the drum technician’s relatives.
Crown lawyer, Dave McCaskill, said he was not surprised by the stay decision given the current state of Canadian law. He said it was too early to consider any appeal but said Nelson was correct in one assessment:
“The family and friends of Mr. Johnson will be quite discouraged and disappointed by this, and perhaps not comprehend why this has come to pass, and why there’s never been an adjudication on its merits,” McCaskill said.
The collapse, which the prosecution blamed on inadequate safety measures, prompted Radiohead to put off part of its 2012 European tour.
Charges in Toronto Radiohead stage collapse stayed over trial delays | Toronto &
 
spaminator
#7
Radiohead 'appalled' charges stayed in deadly Toronto stage collapse
The Canadian Press
First posted: Friday, September 08, 2017 11:08 AM EDT | Updated: Friday, September 08, 2017 11:12 AM EDT
TORONTO - The members of Radiohead say they are “appalled” that charges stemming from a fatal concert stage collapse in Toronto in 2012 were stayed.
On Tuesday, a judge ruled the justice system had failed by allowing the case to take far too long to come to trial.
In a statement, the band said the decision “offers no consolation, closure or assurance that this kind of accident will not happen again.”
They added it was “an insult to the memory of Scott Johnson, his parents and our crew.”
Johnson, a 33-year-old British drum technician, was killed on June 16, 2012, a few hours before Radiohead was set to take the stage at Downsview Park. Three others were injured.
A year later, entertainment company Live Nation, engineer Domenic Cugliari and contractor Optex Staging were charged with a total of 13 offences under provincial health and safety laws.
The subsequent trial was derailed when the presiding judge, Shaun Nakatsuru, declared he had lost jurisdiction given his appointment to a higher court. That decision led to a senior justice declaring a mistrial in May, and a new hearing was set to begin Monday.
But Ontario court Judge Ann Nelson noted the Supreme Court of Canada has set a presumptive ceiling of 18 months for proceedings in provincial courts, and this case — which would have taken a total of almost five years to complete if it had gone to a second trial — would have lasted three times longer than that limit.
The judge acknowledged her ruling would have a “negative impact” on the victims of the stage collapse, especially on Johnson’s family.
“No doubt, this decision will be incomprehensible to Mr. Johnson’s family, who can justifiably complain that justice has not been done,” Nelson said.
Radiohead drum technician Scott Johnson died when the band's stage collapsed at Downsview Park in Toronto in 2014. (STEPHANIE HEINTZMAN PHOTO)

Radiohead 'appalled' charges stayed in deadly Toronto stage collapse | Toronto &
 

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