66% of Female Restaurant Workers Report Being Sexually Harassed by Managers


mentalfloss
#1
66% of Female Restaurant Workers Report Being Sexually Harassed by Managers

A large majority of restaurant workers say they face consistent sexual harassment at the hands of customers, co-workers and managers, according to a new advocacy group survey.

Researchers at the Restaurant Opportunities Center (ROC) United, a nonprofit which advocates for low-paid service industry workers, interviewed 688 current and former restaurant employees from 39 states, and reported a number of findings:

66% of female and more than half of male restaurant employees reported having been sexually harassed by managers

80% of women and 70% of men reported sexual harassment by co-workers

78% of women and 55% of men reported sexual harassment by customers

50% women 47% men, and 60% trans workers characterized the behavior as “scary” or “unwanted”

30% of women, 22% of men, and 40% of transgender workers said inappropriate touching was a “common occurrence”
Examples of sexual harassment given by respondents ran from sexual jokes to explicit advances and groping. In general, women reported a higher volume of harassment than men.

ROC United also said reports of sexual harassment increase in restaurants which give employees a base pay of $2.13 an hour—forcing waitstaff to rely on tips from customers—rather than offering minimum wage.

“When a guest does it, then I feel a lot more powerless,” a participating Houston server told ROC United. “That’s when I’m like, man, that’s where my money’s coming from.”

Women making $2.13 an hour reported getting sexually harassed twice as much as women working in states that pay minimum wage to all workers, and they were three times as likely to be told by management to wear “sexier” clothes, they said.

Several survey participants said that management not only dismissed harassment at the hands of customers, but encouraged them to play along.

“I was kind of surprised,” said a respondent. “He said, ‘Well, those people pay a lot of money for our services and, I mean, would it hurt to smile a little bit, be a little bit more friendly to them?’ And I was blown away.”

http://time.com/3478041/restaurant-s...ssment-survey/
 
Tecumsehsbones
+1
#2
Oh, quit whining! They're just being friendly.

There is no sexual harassment, only pissed-off lesbian feminazis hating men.
 
Cannuck
+2
#3  Top Rated Post
Like the video of the women walking around New York, I think the definition of harassment is far too broad, making these stories all but meaningless.
 
Tecumsehsbones
+1
#4
Damn right. Why, just look at poor Jian Gomeshi, being persecuted and made out to be a criminal and a pervert just for a little horseplay.
 
mentalfloss
#5
Maybe Jian can help refine that definition.

Edit: Curse you Tecumseh for beating be to the punch.
 
Tecumsehsbones
+2
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalfloss View Post

Maybe Jian can help refine that definition.

Edit: Curse you Tecumseh for beating be to the punch.

Hah! Shemanese curses don't work on Induns!

Y'all got guns, smallpox, habitat destruction, false treaties, residential schools, concentration ca. . . uh, reserves, but we got ALL the cool curses!

That's why we won.
 
mentalfloss
+1
#7
 
Cannuck
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalfloss View Post

Maybe Jian can help refine that definition.

He probably couldn't do worse. When "how are you this evening" is considered harassment, saying 100% of women experience harassment would not be surprising (or accurate)
 
mentalfloss
#9
What is the current legislative definition again?
(Canadian version)
 
Cannuck
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalfloss View Post

What is the current definition again?
(Canadian version)

Whatever the person doing the poll considers, near as I can tell
 
mentalfloss
+1
#11
How do you know it is too broad then?


Heh.

Broad

 
Cannuck
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalfloss View Post

How do you know it is too broad then?

It doesn't really say in this story. That's why I referred to the video of the woman walking around New York where somebody asked " how are you doing this evening" and that was cited as a case of harassment. At the top of the page, it did mention "Examples of sexual harassment reported in a new survey run from sexual jokes to explicit advances and groping", but without knowing what is considered an explicit advance or whether the sexual jokes were even directed at the workers it's hard to say if these people were actually harassed.
 
Walter
#13
Is Gomessy working in all these restaurants?
 
Tecumsehsbones
+1
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by Cannuck View Post

It doesn't really say in this story. That's why I referred to the video of the woman walking around New York where somebody asked " how are you doing this evening" and that was cited as a case of harassment. At the top of the page, it did mention "Examples of sexual harassment reported in a new survey run from sexual jokes to explicit advances and groping", but without knowing what is considered an explicit advance or whether the sexual jokes were even directed at the workers it's hard to say if these people were actually harassed.

Agreed. Experience has shown us that "Don't be a rude, intimidating, crass douchebag" is too high a standard to expect North American men to meet.
 
Cannuck
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

Agreed. Experience has shown us that "Don't be a rude, intimidating, crass douchebag" is too high a standard to expect North American men to meet.

Whose definition of rude? And it is there a difference between being rude to somebody and harassing them?
 
Tecumsehsbones
+1
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by Cannuck View Post

Whose definition of rude? And it is there a difference between being rude to somebody and harassing them?

Good, leave out "intimidating" and focus on "rude." And since there is no single definition or standard for rudeness, that means we can do whatever we want! Thus we have used logic to demonstrate that "Good morning, Alice" and "How 'bout I ram my cock down your throat, you skanky bitch?" are equally acceptable in the workplace.

K, good day's work, guys. Let's all go grab some beers and tits.
 
Cannuck
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

..."Good morning, Alice" and "How 'bout I ram my cock down your throat, you skanky bitch?" are equally acceptable in the workplace....

Or equally unacceptable
 
Tecumsehsbones
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by Cannuck View Post

Or equally unacceptable

Perfect! More whiny junior-high school diversion! See, I didn't go to junior high school, so I'm kinda behind the curve on these techniques.
 
Cannuck
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

Perfect! More whiny junior-high school diversion! See, I didn't go to junior high school, so I'm kinda behind the curve on these techniques.

Don't be so silly. The woman in the NY vid would clearly see them both as unacceptable so it's hardly a diversion...but please, do carry on. Unlike you, I don't see your rudeness as harassing in any way.
 
mentalfloss
#20
What happened to calling women broads anyway?

 
Walter
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalfloss View Post

What happened to calling women broads anyway?

Broads, dames, gals, it's all the same to me, generic names for females.
 
Twila
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by Cannuck View Post

Don't be so silly. The woman in the NY vid would clearly see them both as unacceptable so it's hardly a diversion...but please, do carry on. Unlike you, I don't see your rudeness as harassing in any way.

But did she see them ALL as harassing or was it just meant to show how much (unsolicited)chatter is directed to a woman who is merely walking down the street? Sometimes it's not the individual comment but adding them all up together that makes a bigger impact or a more harassing feel. New York may be a bit of an anomoly.


Here is a video of a girl (a little more dressed up) walking the streets of Aukland New Zealand doing the same thing as the girl in New York. Very very different

Catcall experiment in Auckland - YouTube

How is someone supposed to know if someone is hyper sensitive to certain comments. example: I tell a joke thinking I'm being funny, but the person I'm telling it to is hyper christian and feels offended. Is that harassment? How am I to know they're hyper christian and easily offended?

Some days I'm in a great mood and I'll talk to anyone who talks to me. Some days I'm too busy to stop and chat. Some days I'm just in a bad mood. On a bad day comments could cause me to be angry. Can I legitimately consider them harassment?

Quote: Originally Posted by mentalfloss View Post

What happened to calling women broads anyway?

Times have changed.

I'm curious to know how the word broad came to be used to refer to women.
 
Tecumsehsbones
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by Twila View Post

I'm curious to know how the word broad came to be used to refer to women.

It's a reference to the as. . . um, hips, dear.
 
Cannuck
#24
Quote: Originally Posted by Twila View Post

But did she see them ALL as harassing or was it just meant to show how much (unsolicited)chatter is directed to a woman who is merely walking down the street? Sometimes it's not the individual comment but adding them all up together that makes a bigger impact or a more harassing feel.

I agree. Context is important. That's something most of these polls fail to bring up. If you simply ask people if they've been harassed it's hard to get a real picture of what is going on. You don't have to look any further than this forum where some people feel getting a few neg reps is harassing and others couldn't care less about the rep system. I used to work with a woman that couldn't quite grasp the concept of personal space. It bothered everybody but nobody considered it harassment. That might have been due to the fact she was a woman and/or she was not in a position of authority. Would simply changing the situation to a male or a manager make it harassment or would the intent have to change?

All I know is that when you water down the definition of something, the term becomes meaningless and it's a disservice to those that suffer from real harassment.
 
taxslave
+1
#25
SO what about the other 33%? Too ugly? Or do they like it?
 
Twila
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by Tecumsehsbones View Post

It's a reference to the as. . . um, hips, dear.

oh...Rather unflattering..well I guess if you have no desire to have sexual relations with a woman it'd be ok to use this term...


And some men wonder why the only action they get is from their left or right hand...
 
taxslave
+1
#27
Quote: Originally Posted by Twila View Post

oh...Rather unflattering..well I guess if you have no desire to have sexual relations with a woman it'd be ok to use this term...


And some men wonder why the only action they get is from their left or right hand...

The only threesome some of them will ever get.