The American Civil War


TomZart
#1
THE CIVIL WAR


In 1860 life was good,
Till its simpleness ceased one day.
The North wished to save the Union
While the South chose to break away.

America was torn apart
As six hundred thousand died.
Throughout four years of total war,
Women without husbands cried.

The sad fact of the Civil War
Is what was left at its end.
Too many times, menís evil acts
Destroyed both foe and friend.

The problem was, once it began,
There was no peace or compromise.
Total victory must be proclaimed
Before rage would leave menís eyes.

Destroy all that helps the enemy,
Was the cry of either side.
Anything to obtain victory,
As death on horseback did ride.

Black men dressed in old uniforms
Became the Unionís reserve.
They fought and died for their freedom
And their rights they earned and deserve.

Lifestyles would forever change
For all who survived the war.
It had ended as it began,
With sadness, misery and more.

Both sides prayed to the same God,
And spoke words from the Bible.
The prayers of both were not answered,
For all involved were liable.


FREEDOM


In their new uniforms,
The young march off
Not knowing who shall return.
With a proud devotion,
They brandish their flag
Leaving loved ones to wonder and yearn.

May we all be buried
By all of our children
Is an ancient tribal prayer.
Theyíre so easy to lose
But so hard to forget;
Such a burden for a parent to bear.

Oh, the taste of victory
Shall soon be forgotten;
But, never that which was lost.
For those rows of white headstones
In peaceful green fields,
Make it easy to tally the cost.

America has survived all attempts to destroy
Knowing the cruelty of war,
And, we who remain
Must help keep her free
For those who can march no more!


THE KANSAS FRONTIER


Coronado, in his search to find gold for Spain,
Was the first European on the green Kansas plane.
Explorers and traders were arriving from France.
They saw the buffalo and the Indians who danced.

At the mouth of the Kaw were campfires in the dark;
Two men by the river named Lewis and Clark.
Large numbers of Indians, forced out from the East,
Resettled to Kansas where the buffalo feast.

So, many a cowboy decided to stay,
It wasnít very long and most Indians were forced away.
When Missouri joined the Union; the slave states equaled the free.
Which way would Kansas vote, congress was anxious to see?

The Heart-Landers were bleeding; their towns were on fire;
As raiders from the slave states tried to force their desire.
The settlement of Lawrence was sacked by a mob,
In revenge came John Brown, who would murder and rob.

Kansas joined the Union as the Civil War began.
After four long years of tragedy, many women lost their man.
Cattle trails met the railroads as they pushed across the state.
Farmers planted corn and wheat as the buffalo awaited their fate.

Those frontier days have long since gone, though the sunflower is still here;
My childhood home of Kansas where the buffalo roam with the deer.


BLACK POWDER BRIDGE


A courier rider hands his papers to me;
They are instructions from Robert E. Lee.
I am advised now is the time,
To stop the troop movement on the Rock Island line.

I muster my men and they load up the boats,
We powder our pistols and darken our coats.
Traveling the currents, the sun slips from sight,
As brave men with a purpose have gathered to fight.

We capture a bridge before the moonrise,
The Yankees who are here shall soon feed the flies.
The evil of war feeds on my brain
As I light the fuse to destroy a train.

Above us a trestle of timber and tar
As we pull our oars for a willowed sandbar.
From the banks of the river; we watch it approach;
Thereís shadows of soldiers, in the windows of a coach.

With a burst of bright yellow and a roar in my ear,
I hear them scream as they íre falling in fear.
The river is boiling in steam, steel and stems,
Back home their families shall soon sing funeral hymns.

The one lone survivor was a red stallion stud,
I lassoed his neck, and freed him from the mud.
As I ride in his saddle beneath the stars that shine,
I pray for forgiveness and some peace of mind.

War is a lesson we Ďre eager to learn
When man has that fever to murder and burn.
Lord, please forgive me for what I have done,
For all those Iíve silenced were some motherís son.


THE FEVER OF FEAR


Cannons are bursting hot metal from the ground.
Soldiers are looting and burning our town.
The fever of fear rushes through my veins,
As too many Bluecoats jump from troop trains.

Smoke from hot barrels is swirling around,
As four thousand muskets volley their sound.
All of my comrades have stopped a lead ball;
Most cry out, then stumble and fall.

Even the young lad who carried our flag,
Now he lies dead as he clings to that rag.
Wagons with the wounded trail blood on the ground,
Death and destruction are easily found.

The Generals are crying ícause they canít stand defeat;
But itís always the soldier who dies on his feet.
Horse hooves are pounding on a bridge made of boards,
As the sunlight reflects from the blades of their swords.

Quickly I hide out in the roots of a tree,
Where the dirt has eroded and thereís just room for me.
After dark I sneak out with the cover of fog,
Then float down the river, as I cling to a log.

Songs of their victory, ring out through the night,
While from the cold, muddy water, I see their firelight.
It makes me remember my old country church,
Where the preacher spoke Godís word from his holy perch.

That the seed of all conflict began in a cave;
When man, like the wild wolf had to prove he was brave.


THUNDER IN THE GROUND


Cannons are bellowing from a ridge far away.
The battle lines are forming and thereís little time to pray.
Musket balls are pelting like hailstones from the sky;
Iím so full of fear cause I don ít want to die.

From beyond yonder hill comes a terrifying sound,
Itís the music of the buglers and thereís thunder in the ground.
The fast-riding troopers have all drawn out their swords.
They íre shouting and screaming as they charge up the gorge.

Itís hard to believe how many make it through;
As theyíre hacking and shooting at the boys dressed in blue.
Then come the soldier men who run upon their feet,
Every time I drop one, my heart skips a beat.

Thereís a storm on the ground made of death, dust and smoke.
My throat is so dry, I can ít help but choke.
The fury of the battle is bound to settle down,
When most of the fighters lie dead on the ground.

After dark, the stretcher-bearers are afraid to search around.
The wild hogs eat the wounded and I can ít stand the sound.
Come dawn, we dig ditches for all the brave, lifeless men.
Then quote words from our Bible praying heaven lets them in.


SLAVERY


When you chain the neck of a slave,
The other end fastens to you.
Your heart and soul become corrupt,
And all which is evil youíll do.

No government shall exist for long,
Whoís people are not really free.
Though around the world there are those,
Who stay blind to how life should be.

Any who must enslave others,
Will dwell in their own living hell
After death, theyíll join their master,
In that place from heaven he fell.

But till then weíll fight and resist
Making them put their chains away.
And those of us who may die first,
From heaven shall watch and pray


BROTHER AGAINST BROTHER


In the course of becoming officers
The young men of West Point bonded like brothers.
Till roomers of Civil War transformed friend to foe,
As many cadets chose to serve others.

Fifty-five of sixty major battles fought,
Were lead by graduates of the long gray line.
Yankees and Rebels ravaged one another,
For to kill and plunder were virtues of the time.

Over six hundred thousand soldiers were consumed,
Not counting multitudes of population.
Cities, farms and the countryside were laid to waste,
Before our Union was restored to a nation.


THE LITTLEST SOLDIER


Nine year old Johnny Clem who stood just four feet tall,
Ran away from Ohio to answer his countryís call.

He joined up with the Union and became a drummer boy,
Soon to prove the gun he wore was far more than a toy.

Armed with a sawed-off musket, cut down to just fit him,
He shot a Rebel horseman who tried to do him in.

Awarded his sergeantís stripes and the silver medal,
His comrades offered him hot coffee from their kettle.

The newspapers of the North, gladly published his story,
Telling of the nine year old who earned his countryís glory.


THE BATTLE


The moon is sky high
And perfectly round
As it highlights the beauty
Of disputed ground.

Life is a journey
Where the passage is free.
After, thereís judgment,
By the living and Thee.

Tomorrowís carnage,
Weíll survive if we can.
Death and dismemberment
By the hand of man.

Some will stumble
With absence of breath.
While others charge
Into the face of death.

Weíll race toward the battle
And pray for the best,
Hoping somehow
We pass Godís test.


BUGLES


Their red and blue, ragtag flag stood out,
Against their dust covered uniforms of gray.
Savagely we fought to kill our enemy,
As the battle raged on in the heat of the day

Volley after volley we put forth our blaze,
With thousands of led balls snapping flesh and bone.
Blistering sweat rolled down every face,
As the tunes of war by bugles were blown.

There was a clanking sound of ramrods in barrels,
As each new minieball was loaded and fired.
Some shot aimlessly into the smoke,
While others took aim at the worn and tired.

Bullets were popping like the fourth of July, S
Yet our enemy kept surging ahead.
All at once they broke and ran off in groups,
Scattering as for the forest they fled.

From behind the protection of a stacked-stone wall,
The victorious cheered or just sat starring,
At all the bodies of friend and foe
While for the wounded the surgeons were caring.

Soon the war was over and I survived,
Despite itís brutality on trampled ground.
From boy to man I was transformed,
Though, still in the night I hear its sound.


THE HINGE OF HISTORY


The hinge of history swings in all directions
As the happenings of the past are written down.
Out of all that has occurred since manís beginnings,
Less has been recorded than waits to be found.

Babylonians kept chronicles of history,
Hebrews wrote the past as a dramatic story.
Greeks had no faith in the future at all,
Believing mans repeated errors doom his glory.

Christians added a new dimension to history,
Looking forward to Christís return to earth.
An on going drama involving man and God,
Believing all are created of equal worth.

Some have asked why must we study history;
It just encourages us to live in the past.
When we forget history we repeat its mistakes,
As the outcome of humanity is cast.

All Poems By
Tom Zart
 
darleneonfire
#2
Quote: Originally Posted by TomZart View Post

Some have asked why must we study history;
It just encourages us to live in the past.
When we forget history we repeat its mistakes,
As the outcome of humanity is cast.

All Poems By
Tom Zart


Since you insist on putting all these poems here, you should know that they are very cliched and trite. Rhymes went out with hula hoops, real poetry is a medium of expression and feeling, not rhyme schemes. Anyway, I didn't sign on to read people's poetry. Once you start, others are bound to follow...hint this place is called Canadian Content DISCUSSION forum..so you want to discuss anything?
 
hermanntrude
#3
poetry is expression, discussion requires expression.
 
MikeyDB
#4
Sure Herm like discussin requires bull****...lots of that here.
 
hermanntrude
#5
expression. one can express the milk of human kindness or one can express bull****
 
MikeyDB
#6
Gotcha...

Let me express...

The American Civil war is about as important to me (and should be to the majority of Canadians) as smegma.

The only thing wrong with the American Civil war was that it ended too soon.
 
DurkaDurka
#7
So are the non-moderator forum police dictating what one can post now? if it doesn't interest you, don't read it!
 
MikeyDB
#8
I didn't.
 
hermanntrude
#9
i like his fishing poem.
 
Colpy
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by MikeyDB View Post

Gotcha...

Let me express...

The American Civil war is about as important to me (and should be to the majority of Canadians) as smegma.

The only thing wrong with the American Civil war was that it ended too soon.

Now Mikey, that is just nasty.

You shouldn't let your instinctive anti-Americanism shadow your thinking like that.

The American Civil War was very important in Canadian history...........first of all, we backed the Confederacy, even allowing Guerillas to operate from Canadian soil........and we got very afraid when the Union won, and had all those soldiers just south of the border with nothing to do........thus Confederation to provide a united defense. Unimportant? I don't think so.

BTW, you will notice that not only did the USA NOT attack us, they moved quickly against the Fenians attacking us from their side of the border.

AND we supported the pro-slavery side. So you can get down off your moral high horse.

As well. Canadians served in US regiments, paradoxically almost always on the Union side. The 21st Maine, which served in a pivotal role at Gettysburg, was about 30% Maritimers.

Unimportant?

I don't think so.
 
TomZart
#11
Thank you all for your time and helpful replys.


THE HINGE OF HISTORY


The hinge of history swings in all directions
As the happenings of the past are written down.
Out of all that has occurred since man's beginnings,
Less has been recorded than waits to be found.

Babylonians kept chronicles of history,
Hebrews wrote the past as a dramatic story.
Greeks had no faith in the future at all,
Believing mans repeated errors doom his glory.

Christians added a new dimension to history,
Looking forward to Christ’s return to earth.
An on going drama involving man and God,
Believing all are created of equal worth.

Some have asked why must we study history;
It just encourages us to live in the past.
When we forget history we repeat its mistakes,
As the outcome of humanity is cast.

By Tom Zart
 
Daz_Hockey
#12
The one thing I will say about the American Civil war is this:

A lot of American's say it was "brother versus brother", but the same could be applied to most American wars up until that point, 1776, 1812, they were generally brother versus brother too. It's just history would like to paint the others as a fight against another nation, when in fact, they were no such thing.

Kinda like people calling Henry the 8th a protestant, when, although he founded the church of England he was actually a catholic, and Augustus etc.....
 
TomZart
#13
Thank you for your helpful and wise reply.
 
missile
#14
Being somewhat of a history buff, anything on the Civil War is of interest to me..and the poetry isn't bad,either
 
TomZart
#15
Dear missile,

Thank you,thank you, here is a poem for you being a history buff.


GENERAL WASHINGTON



Once in command, he boxed in the British

At Boston where he captured Dorchester Heights,
Overlooking the Brits at his mercy
As his men took aim with their cannon sites.

The British commander had but one choice,
To sail to New York to renew the fight.
Where the English had much greater forces,
Who soon chased Washington's men in full flight.

They continued on to Pennsylvania
After crossing the Hudson in retreat,
With the British forces in hot pursuit
It looked as though George was doomed to defeat.

When winter seemed to have stopped the fighting
That's when Washington crossed the Delaware.
On that Christmas night he captured Trenton
Where Hessians were surprised and unaware.

He whipped the British at Princeton,
Where in victory his men began to sing.
Washington then wintered at Morristown,
Training his troops for the combat of spring.

Washington fought bravely at Brandywine
And again at a place called Germantown,
But the British were the victorious ones
As the dead of both sides covered the ground.

Americans were blessed early that spring,
When the French entered the war on their side.
Though most suffered frostbite at Valley Forge,
With the help of the French they marched in stride.

The battles raged on, in the North and South
As the King’s soldiers laid waste to the land.
Washington himself was in great despair,
Pleading for aid for his weakened command.

His prayers were answered by 5000 troops,
And a French fleet who took Chesapeake Bay.
They bottled up Cornwallis at Yorktown,
Who surrendered to victory drums at play.

Yorktown was really the end of the war
Though not many quite realized that fact yet.
But the British soon grew tired of the fight
And the terms for its end were signed and set.

Washington yearned to retire at home,
But his country chose him first president.
Cheering crowds waved flags of love and support,
For they believed that "he," by God, was sent.


By Tom Zart

 
Daz_Hockey
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by TomZart View Post

Dear missile,

Thank you,thank you, here is a poem for you being a history buff.


GENERAL WASHINGTON



Once in command, he boxed in the British

At Boston where he captured Dorchester Heights,

Overlooking the Brits at his mercy

As his men took aim with their cannon sites.

The British commander had but one choice,
To sail to New York to renew the fight.
Where the English had much greater forces,
Who soon chased Washington's men in full flight.

They continued on to Pennsylvania
After crossing the Hudson in retreat,
With the British forces in hot pursuit
It looked as though George was doomed to defeat.

When winter seemed to have stopped the fighting
That's when Washington crossed the Delaware.
On that Christmas night he captured Trenton
Where Hessians were surprised and unaware.

He whipped the British at Princeton,
Where in victory his men began to sing.
Washington then wintered at Morristown,
Training his troops for the combat of spring.

Washington fought bravely at Brandywine
And again at a place called Germantown,
But the British were the victorious ones
As the dead of both sides covered the ground.

Americans were blessed early that spring,
When the French entered the war on their side.
Though most suffered frostbite at Valley Forge,
With the help of the French they marched in stride.

The battles raged on, in the North and South
As the King’s soldiers laid waste to the land.
Washington himself was in great despair,
Pleading for aid for his weakened command.

His prayers were answered by 5000 troops,
And a French fleet who took Chesapeake Bay.
They bottled up Cornwallis at Yorktown,
Who surrendered to victory drums at play.

Yorktown was really the end of the war
Though not many quite realized that fact yet.
But the British soon grew tired of the fight
And the terms for its end were signed and set.

Washington yearned to retire at home,
But his country chose him first president.
Cheering crowds waved flags of love and support,
For they believed that "he," by God, was sent.


By Tom Zart



What a load of rubbish....."Destined by god"...a lot of phsyciatric patients think they're doing what they do because god told them to do it.

Do you know what Idi Amin and George Washington have in common?.........

Both were in the British Army, both didn't like indians and both claimed to have destroyed the British Empire when in fact they did nothing of the sort....


although of course Washington's lies were much more intricute......what was it Hitler said "a population will believe one big lie much easier than a series of little ones"

I, and my country have a right to hate that man, just as America does to love him...sorry that'll never change.

(I wish to point out NOW, that I in now way dislike ANY Americans, and infact a lot of water has passed under the bridge since Washington was alive, but it's just history has two sides and I'm representing the lesser known version...he could have been a great man, I dont know this because I wasnt around then, but the same is true vis-versa)
Last edited by Daz_Hockey; Jan 20th, 2007 at 03:40 PM..
 
TomZart
#17
Thank you for your time and reply.
 
Hotshot
#18
The yankee civil war just shows the intelligence of the yankee people: less than their combat boot sizes.
 
Colpy
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by Hotshot View Post

The yankee civil war just shows the intelligence of the yankee people: less than their combat boot sizes.

Huh?!

Perhaps you would care to elaborate?

By "Yankee", do you mean the North? Perhaps you are a Southerner and prefer the southern name for the conflict: The War of Damn Yankee Aggression.

 
Daz_Hockey
#20
When I was sat on Lincoln's memorial in DC I thought about the American civil war, not least because a very famous Abraham Lincoln speech is engraved on the side of the inner chamber, I cannot remember the exact line, but he does go on about the duality of slavery in the Union, and how on earth can the country continue to suggest they are free and better than anyone else when they allow that to happen and it must be stopped.

for those reasons alone, the civil war had to happen, period.

Smart man Honest Abe, I admire him, he had a point and he's probably the only early US president I look up to.

Daz
 
TomZart
#21
Thanks you frinds in the north for your replys. I will not be posting any more poems here for I was told not to by the boss of this forum.

Thank you for your kindness, if you like my poems look "Tom Zart" up on google and you will find 261 poems on over 200 web sites.

Tom Zart
The Most Published Poet
On The Web
 

Similar Threads

19
American Civil Rights Movement
by Jersay | Jan 29th, 2017
0
We had a civil war?
by Blackleaf | Dec 21st, 2008
0
The American Civil War
by TomZart | Dec 29th, 2006
7
On the Eve of an American Civil War
by Marbleheader | May 17th, 2006
19
Civil War?
by #juan | Mar 20th, 2006