Saskatchewan Labour Shortage "Worst in History".


petros
#1
More than 80 per cent of Saskatchewan's non-union contractors believe the current labour shortage is the worst in the province's history, with nearly three out of four unable to hire a journeyperson within three months and four out of 10 unable to hire at all.

Merit Contractors Association Saskatchewan, which represents 225 "open-shop'' or non-unionized contractors employing more than 4,000 workers in the province, also said 85 per cent of its member companies are having difficulty retaining employees.

The association recently commissioned a survey of its members to determine the extent of the labour shortage and its impact on construction activity. Karen Low, executive director of the association, said the survey indicated that the labour shortage was a much bigger problem than previously thought.

"(Until) the last year, even our sector didn't realize how dire it had become,'' Low said. "I don't think anybody anticipated (the growth in construction activity)."

With two-thirds of companies having difficulty retaining skilled employees, combined with the cost of finding and training new employees, the labour shortage is delaying some projects and driving up the cost of construction, she said.

Wages increase as contractors try to attract and retain employees with better benefits, company-sponsored training, profit sharing and bonuses. Those higher labour costs eventually are reflected in higher construction costs.

"When wages start going up," Low said, "there are only two things that can happen. (Either) that cost is passed onto the customer or the profit margins shrink. I think there's bit a bit of both happening.''

While there's no hard evidence that projects are being delayed or even cancelled due to the labour shortage, Low said there's plenty of anecdotal evidence.

"If you have 10 (employees) one day and the next day you have six, that ultimately impacts how well you can do your job and how quickly," Low said.

The Merit Contractors are calling on government to increase the number of training seats at SIAST and other technical institutes, encourage more First Nations and Metis to enter the trades, expedite the transfer of skilled tradespeople from other provinces and increase immigration of skilled workers.

Michael Fougere, president of the Saskatchewan Construction Association, which has 1,200 membercompanies, including members of the Merit Contractors Association, said the survey results didn't surprise him at all.

"I wouldn't dispute those numbers," Fougere said. "I would say we have the biggest challenge ever in terms of finding skilled workers.''
But Fougere questions whether many projects have been delayed or cancelled due to the shortage.

"Rarely do we see projects that are not completed on time," he said. "There are a few, but it's rare, even in this market, that we see any project delayed or cancelled because of a lack of workers to do the work.''

Fougere said out-ofprovince firms, union and non-union, are coming into Saskatchewan to get a piece of the action, which is also increasing the demand for skilled trades.


"There have been investments in training seats, but it clearly isn't keeping up with the demand,'' he added.

Don Morgan, minister of advanced education, labour relations and workplace safety, said the government is well aware of the labour shortage and has been working on several fronts to address it, including increasing the number of training seats by 50 per cent.

"We've offered $1,000 scholarships for high school students to enter the trades," he said. "We've had the premier (Brad Wall) over in Ireland this year. We anticipate that a minimum of 400 or 500 people will come over from that - We're aggressively seeking people from other parts of Canada and we're trying to do everything we can to educate people in the province through apprenticeship and SIAST programs.''

The province has also doubled the ratio of apprentices to journeypersons and cut waiting lists for trades training, Morgan added.

"We're getting a handle on it, and we will do more as time goes on," he said. "We thought we were managing relatively well, so this came as a bit of surprise that it's as bad as it is, so we will continue to staff up and ramp wherever we can.''
Copyright (c) The StarPhoenix



Read more: Labour shortage 'worst in history'
 
mentalfloss
#2
That's what happens when your partner in crime unsustainably shoots their load.
 
petros
+4
#3  Top Rated Post
I'm looking forward to the 100+ year orgasm.
 
mentalfloss
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

I'm looking forward to the 100+ year orgasm.

Yes, we can see that it's having the beneficial impact of creating significant labour shortages.
 
petros
#5
What come with labour shortages Flossy?
 
mentalfloss
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

What come with labour shortages Flossy?

Lost opportunity.
 
petros
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalfloss View Post

Lost opportunity.

You have that backwards.
 
mentalfloss
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

You have that backwards.

It's lost opportunity if the available labour does not meet the demand or there is not enough demand for the number of workers available. Pumping out a resource full throttle only intensifies that disparity and creates further lost opportunity.
 
B00Mer
+1
#9
I would like to know if the wages reflect that shortage, or are they trying to go it on the cheap.. and that's the reason they are not getting to hires.

I remember Burger King in Airdrie, Alberta was paying $12 to $15/hr at one time and had a sign apologizing for the short staff and the time it took to get served.
 
petros
+1
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalfloss View Post

It's lost opportunity if the available labour does not meet the demand or there is not enough demand for the number of workers available. Pumping out a resource full throttle only intensifies that disparity and creates further lost opportunity.

The are no unemployed skilled workiers in Canada seeking opportunity?

Full throttle? Not even close. You still haven't grasped the scale of things have you?

Quote: Originally Posted by B00Mer View Post

I would like to know if the wages reflect that shortage, or are they trying to go it on the cheap.. and that's the reason they are not getting to hires.

I remember Burger King in Airdrie, Alberta was paying $12 to $15/hr at one time and had a sign apologizing for the short staff and the time it took to get served.

They are paying top dollar and yes Mc D's pays $13 an hour here.
 
TenPenny
+3
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

The are no unemployed skilled workiers in Canada seeking opportunity?

Probably not, we pay them to sit at home and do fuk all, because in our country, it's your right to sit at home and do nothing instead of having to move where there is work.

Meanwhile, we subsidize businesses to import workers from other countries.

Works like a charm.
 
JLM
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

The are no unemployed skilled workiers in Canada seeking opportunity?

Full throttle? Not even close. You still haven't grasped the scale of things have you?

They are paying top dollar and yes Mc D's pays $13 an hour here.

Why would someone take that when they can make at least 50% more for the same thing on B.C. Ferries?
 
Mowich
+3
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

I'm looking forward to the 100+ year orgasm.

Not a bad position to be in, petros...............much better than having a province where unemployment is high and opportunities are few. I'd say this was almost another good luck story for the province.
 
Walter
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

Why would someone take that when they can make at least 50% more for the same thing on B.C. Ferries?

Is there a shortage of workers in BC?
 
darkbeaver
#15
What would a slightly worn industrial mechanic expect to be paid in this place Saskachewon? A recent shortfall is threatening to compel my reentry into the workforce. Of course I require a management position, desk , phone, puter that sort of thing.
 
TenPenny
+1
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by darkbeaver View Post

What would a slightly worn industrial mechanic expect to be paid in this place Saskachewon? A recent shortfall is threatening to compel my reentry into the workforce. Of course I require a management position, desk , phone, puter that sort of thing.

You're not much of an industrial mechanic if you want a desk position.

Poseur deluxe.
 
GroundWater
#17
Alberta is having the same problem, it's 2007 all over again.
 
taxslave
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalfloss View Post

Lost opportunity.

Wrong. It brings higher wages and more opportunity for those that are any good.
Since I am lazy does any one know if they are paying close to union wages and bennies?
 
petros
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

Wrong. It brings higher wages and more opportunity for those that are any good.
Since I am lazy does any one know if they are paying close to union wages and bennies?

You earn the same in both union and non but nons have been ****ing up on projects so unions have been called in to repair and get things straight.
 
skookumchuck
#20
What are they paying for Gopher tails these days?
 
damngrumpy
+2
#21
First of all it is good to see a Province doing well, but then Saskatchewan has
always had stable government for the most part with the exception of the Divine
years.
yes there have been ups and downs but basically the people of Saskatchewan
have had good government.
The problem is this government has set in motion development without a real
plan and that has consequences in the long term. Uncontrolled development
is often worse than no development. This too shall pass, as it were the up and
down nature of resource industries has a habit of correcting itself abruptly.
Brad Wall is not a bad guy, he is a populist conservative which is not the best
but its not the social conservative whack job group like the BC Conservative Party.
The real test for Saskatchewan will come if the slow down comes and there is no
attempt to diversify the nature of the economy. A slowdown with a resource
economy only would be devastating because there would be an influx of population
with no jobs. That is not good for anyone.
 
petros
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by skookumchuck View Post

What are they paying for Gopher tails these days?

You'll have the Radio Flyer you've always wanted in no time at all.

Quote: Originally Posted by damngrumpy View Post

First of all it is good to see a Province doing well, but then Saskatchewan has
always had stable government for the most part with the exception of the Divine
years.
yes there have been ups and downs but basically the people of Saskatchewan
have had good government.
The problem is this government has set in motion development without a real
plan and that has consequences in the long term. Uncontrolled development
is often worse than no development. This too shall pass, as it were the up and
down nature of resource industries has a habit of correcting itself abruptly.
Brad Wall is not a bad guy, he is a populist conservative which is not the best
but its not the social conservative whack job group like the BC Conservative Party.
.

It's was Calvert who got the ball rolling with resoure developement not Wall.
 
darkbeaver
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by TenPenny View Post

You're not much of an industrial mechanic if you want a desk position.

Poseur deluxe.

The efficient industrial mechanic always seeks elevation above the trenches. Actually I just want money for nothin and my chicks for free. I got a very bad knee and I,m old, no more dragging motors over catwalks for me.
 
Machjo
#24
So if Ontario social security were smart, it would find out what trades and professions are in demand in Sask, provide free training for the unemployed in those fields, then tell the companies all they have to do is pay transportation and room and board for until the first paycheck. If they agree to that, cut their social security premiums (barring special circumstances of course, but any able-bodied and able-minded single person with no dependents, absolutely!).
 
captain morgan
+1
#25
The time lag between training a heavy duty mechanic and getting them into a productive position is pretty long... That suggestion is great for long term ops, but does nothing to deal with the needs today
 
taxslave
+1
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by darkbeaver View Post

The efficient industrial mechanic always seeks elevation above the trenches. Actually I just want money for nothin and my chicks for free. I got a very bad knee and I,m old, no more dragging motors over catwalks for me.

That's what apprentices are for.

Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

Is there a shortage of workers in BC?

No. The ferries are government workers unions. So the cafeteria staff get almost tradesman pay for rotten ronnies quality food and service. Somewhat better on the big boats where White Spot runs the cafeteria but not much.
 
Machjo
#27
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

The time lag between training a heavy duty mechanic and getting them into a productive position is pretty long... That suggestion is great for long term ops, but does nothing to deal with the needs today

At least it could solve the long-term problem. In the short-term, how about Canada sign labour-movement agreements with other countries so as to further reduce the red tape in hiring foreign workers.

This combination would help to deal with both the short and long-term labour shortages.
 
petros
#28
Quote: Originally Posted by Machjo View Post

At least it could solve the long-term problem. In the short-term, how about Canada sign labour-movement agreements with other countries so as to further reduce the red tape in hiring foreign workers.

This combination would help to deal with both the short and long-term labour shortages.

Saskatchewan Jobs Mission To Ireland: Canada's Labour Market Not Keeping Up With Needed Skills
 
Machjo
#29
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Saskatchewan Jobs Mission To Ireland: Canada's Labour Market Not Keeping Up With Needed Skills

I can agree to a more open international labour market, as long as it include job training for the domestic unemployed too. But an open labour market should be intended as a supplementary solution and not as a replacement for providing the unemployed with the skills they need for the jobs the market needs.

Also, another way Saskatchewan can cool down its overheating economy is by tax increases, reduced government spending, or a combination of the two. This would also give the Saskatchewan government a chance to pay off its debts.
 
petros
#30
Oh there is all the training anyone could possibly hope for.

Cool off the eonomy? Our debts? Our debts are nothing compared to other provinces. $500 Million or something minor like that. This place is very well run.