Starbucks CEO apologizes for arrest of 2 black men waiting for friend


spaminator
#1
Starbucks CEO apologizes for arrest of 2 black men waiting for friend
Associated Press
More from Associated Press
Published:
April 15, 2018
Updated:
April 15, 2018 4:59 PM EDT
(Twitter video screenshot)
PHILADELPHIA — Starbucks sells itself as a community gathering spot as much as a coffeehouse, a welcoming place with comfortable chairs for lingering, trendy music and Wi-Fi. That’s one reason the arrest of two black men who were sitting in a Starbucks struck a nerve for so many: They were doing exactly what people do at most any of the chain’s 28,000 stores worldwide.
The CEO of Starbucks Co., Kevin Johnson, called the arrests a “reprehensible outcome” and said he wants to personally apologize to the men, saying the company “stands firmly against discrimination or racial profiling.” But that didn’t stop protesters from gathering Sunday outside the store in downtown Philadelphia where the arrests occurred.
As people ordered coffee inside, the Rev. Jeffrey Jordan led a crowd of a couple dozen in chants of “I am somebody, and I demand equality now.”
“It is a shame that (in) the year 2018 we’re still putting up with this mess,” said Jordan. “This country was built on the backs of black and brown people and now Starbucks is going to treat us like we’re second-class.”
In Washington, D.C., Gregory Wilkins usually visits one of three neighbourhood Starbucks for about 45 minutes before work to read the paper with his coffee or smoke a cigarette at the outside tables. Wilkins, who is black, said he’d consider going elsewhere if something like the incident in Philadelphia occurred again.
“If nothing is done about what happened, then yeah,” Wilkins, 56, said as he went into a Starbucks.
The arrests, which occurred Thursday, were captured on video that quickly gained traction on social media.
Video shows several police talking quietly with two black men seated at a table. After a few minutes, officers handcuff the men and lead them outside as other customers say they weren’t doing anything wrong; Philadelphia-area media reported the two had been waiting for a friend.
Officers went to the store after Starbucks employees called 911 to report the men were trespassing, said Police Commissioner Richard Ross. He said officers were told the men had come in and asked to use the restroom but were denied because they hadn’t bought anything. He said they then refused to leave.
Johnson’s statement didn’t address exactly what led to the police call, but a Starbucks spokeswoman said the store where the arrests occurred has a policy that restrooms are for paying customers only. In the video, no Starbucks items are visible in front of either of the men.
Protester Soren Mcclay, 14, (C) demonstrates outside a Center City Starbucks on April 15, 2018 in Philadelphia, Pa. (Mark Makela/Getty Images)
Robert Passikoff, the president of a New York-based consulting firm that researches brand loyalty, said companies like Starbucks are in a tough spot as they attempt to operate both as both community centres and places where people are expected to make a purchase.
“Companies have gone out of their way to establish the kind of emotional bonds and product delivery that they think is going to build engagement and loyalty and, ultimately, profits,” said Passikoff, of Brand Keys Inc. “But today the consumer decides what is right. They have become magnets for social experiences, in the broad sense of ’social,’ but not in the sense that ’Oh, I need to buy something.”’
Johnson said the company’s practices and training led to a “bad outcome,” and the reason for the call that brought police into the shop was incorrect.
“Our store manager never intended for these men to be arrested and this should never have escalated as it did,” said his statement. Johnson said videos of the arrest were “very hard to watch,” and the company was investigating.
Starbucks Mid-Atlantic Regional Vice President Camille Hymes (R)addresses protesters and media in a Center City Starbucks on April 15, 2018 in Philadelphia, Pa. (Mark Makela/Getty Images)
Johnson said the company would further train workers on when to call police and host a company-wide meeting to “underscore our long-standing commitment to treating one another with respect and dignity.”
Protester Jack Willis, 26, (C) demonstrates outside a Starbucks on April 15, 2018 in Philadelphia, Pa. (Mark Makela/Getty Images)
Police haven’t released the names of the men who were arrested. A spokesman for the district attorney’s office said the two were released “because of lack of evidence” that a crime had been committed, but declined further comment, citing a police investigation.
At the protest, Wendy Mial vowed to never enter another Starbucks. Mial, 53, said she was “devastated” by the arrests and urged the small crowd not to the “choose the wrong enemy.”
“The enemy, in some ways, is ourselves,” she said. “Look how few people are here today. Who’s not outraged about this?”
A group of people observe protesters demonstrating outside a Center City Starbucks on April 15, 2018 in Philadelphia, Pa. (Mark Makela/Getty Images)
Starbucks CEO apologizes for arrest of 2 black men waiting for friend | Toronto Sun
 
spaminator
#2
Protesters call for 'anti-black' Starbucks to be shut down after trespassing arrests
Associated Press
More from Associated Press
Published:
April 16, 2018
Updated:
April 16, 2018 11:58 AM EDT
Protesters gather outside of a Starbucks in Philadelphia, Sunday, April 15, 2018, where two black men were arrested Thursday after employees called police to say the men were trespassing. (Michael Bryant/The Philadelphia Inquirer via AP)Michael Bryant / AP
PHILADELPHIA — About two dozen chanting protesters took over a Philadelphia Starbucks on Monday, days after two black men were arrested there when store employees called 911 to say they were trespassing.
“We don’t want this Starbucks to make any money today. That’s our goal,” said Abdul-Aliy Muhammad, one of the protest’s organizers and co-founder of the Black and Brown Workers Collective.
The protesters gathered outside the store in the pouring rain before 7 a.m., while inside it looked like business as usual. However, most people drinking coffee at the tables were regional leaders for the company’s corporate side.
Just before 7:30 a.m., the protesters moved inside and stood in front of the counter, some holding banners reading “End Stop and Frisk,” chanting slogans like, “A whole lot of racism, a whole lot of crap, Starbucks coffee is anti-black.”
Demonstrators occupy the Starbucks that has become the center of protests Monday, April 16, 2018, in Philadelphia. (AP Photo/Jacqueline Larma)
Speeches decried police brutality and gentrification.
Starbucks regional vice-president Camille Hymes attempted to talk to the protesters, but was shouted down.
Camille Hymes, center, regional vice president of Mid-Atlantic operations at Starbucks Coffee Company, speaks with Asa Khalif, of Black Lives Matter, right, after protesters entered the coffee shop, Sunday, April 15, 2018, demanding the firing of the manager who called police resulting in the arrest of two black men on Thursday. (Mark Bryant/The Philadelphia Inquirer via AP)
Over the weekend, demonstrators called for the firing of the employee who contacted police, who arrested the men on Thursday.
Officials have said police officers were told the men had asked to use the store’s restroom but were denied because they hadn’t bought anything and they refused to leave.
@Starbucks The police were called because these men hadn’t ordered anything. They were waiting for a friend to show up, who did as they were taken out in handcuffs for doing nothing. All the other white ppl are wondering why it’s never happened to us when we do the same thing. pic.twitter.com/0U4Pzs55Ci
— Melissa DePino (@missydepino) April 12, 2018
Police haven’t released the names of the men who were arrested and later released after the district attorney’s office said there was lack of evidence that a crime had been committed.
On Monday’s “Good Morning America,” on ABC, Starbucks CEO Kevin Johnson reiterated that the arrests were “reprehensible” and said he hoped to meet with the men to discuss “a constructive solution.”
Starbucks CEO apologizes for arrest of 2 black men waiting for friend
Protesters call for ‘anti-black’ Starbucks to be shut down | Toronto Sun
 
EagleSmack
#3
Love it! Protest at all of them.

Shut em Down!
 
EagleSmack
#4
Starbucks to close all company-owned stores on the afternoon of May 29 for racial-bias education day

http://www.cnbc.com/2018/04/17/starb...ation-day.html

Nice but not long enough.
 
spaminator
#5
'Retail racism': Starbucks incident highlights perils of shopping while black
Associated Press
More from Associated Press
Published:
April 18, 2018
Updated:
April 18, 2018 8:09 PM EDT
Protesters gather outside of a Starbucks in Philadelphia, Sunday, April 15, 2018, where two black men were arrested Thursday after employees called police to say the men were trespassing. The arrest prompted accusations of racism on social media. Starbucks CEO Kevin Johnson posted a lengthy statement Saturday night, calling the situation "disheartening" and that it led to a "reprehensible" outcome.Michael Bryant / AP
PHILADELPHIA — It was a surreal scene that is part of daily life for many black Americans and minorities, an everyday moment gone wrong, ending in complete humiliation.
Two black men were handcuffed and arrested at a Starbucks, setting off a national uproar after the incident was captured on video. A worker complained the men were trespassing, but they maintained they were doing what thousands of people do in the popular coffee shops across the country — waiting to meet a friend.
The exchange was a fresh reminder that, five decades after the end of legal segregation, to be black in America is to be constantly challenged in certain spaces in ways white Americans scarcely have to consider, simply to get through the day without being hassled.
The term used to describe encounters like the one at the Starbucks is “retail racism,” also known as “shopping while black.” It happens when minority customers are treated differently than white customers through a variety of indignities and slights, such as being refused service, falsely accused of shoplifting or reported to security or police over something mundane.
“It is about a perception that black people are undesirable in a given location,” said Princeton University African-American studies professor Imani Perry. “Having to perform being non-threatening … it’s exhausting, and it is a commonplace expectation.”
Starbucks announced Tuesday that it would close its 8,000 U.S. stores for several hours next month to conduct racial-bias training for its nearly 175,000 workers. The company — known as an inclusive and progressive workplace — has been responsive in the wake of the April 12 incident, and CEO Kevin Johnson came to Philadelphia and met with the two men who were arrested. Within hours, Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney condemned the incident, saying it “appears to exemplify what racial discrimination looks like in 2018,” and prosecutors declined to bring charges against the men.
Starbucks to close all U.S. stores for ‘racial-bias education’
Protesters call for ‘anti-black’ Starbucks to be shut down
Starbucks CEO apologizes for arrest
Research and surveys show that “retail racism” remains prevalent, and many black Americans have had their own “Starbucks moment” in establishments across the country. It’s a phenomenon not limited by race, age, or gender, affecting even billionaire Oprah Winfrey — turned away at a Paris Hermes shop in 2003 — and former President Barack Obama, who spoke from the White House in the wake of the George Zimmerman acquittal in 2013 about his experiences as a younger man of being followed in stores and doors locking as he passed by.
The Starbucks encounter wasn’t shocking or surprising for black men like Ameen Akbar. Instead, it felt routine.
Bald-headed, bearded, with a Muslim name, Akbar has sensed being followed in high-end stores when he has worn a hoodie or Timberland boots to shop on weekends. He’s aware of the different look he gets in the same parking lot when he goes to work in a suit, versus showing up in more comfortable clothing.
“I’m hyper-aware of when I’m in these spaces and what that impact can be and how I say things,” said Akbar, 40, a Philadelphia native. “If you’ve been doing it for a lifetime, it becomes part of who you are.”
In a 2016 Gallup poll, 52 per cent of blacks and 17 per cent of whites said they perceived discrimination in stores downtown or in the shopping mall. A study last year by Case Western professor Cassi Pittman found that such practices require black shoppers to navigate being seen as a threat to avoid harassment, humiliation or harm.
And at the core of the Black Lives Matter movement is the pattern of what the group sees as a criminalization of black people for doing everyday things. The movement received the most attention for protests following police shootings of unarmed black men, but its main mission focuses on erasing the underlying, systemic racism at the root of encounters like those at Starbucks.
As she watched a video of the arrests at the Starbucks, Black Lives Matter co-founder Patrisse Cullors thought immediately about the dignity of the two men during the incident.
“And I just watched those men acquiesce to being arrested, knowing that they have to co-operate and they couldn’t do anything else about it,” she said.
The Starbucks incident set off outrage in large part because it was captured on video, but many such slights are undocumented and unacknowledged. In Philadelphia, the exchange was marked not only with video proof, but by the indignation and attempted intervention of a pair of white bystanders.
The escalation of mundane encounters for African-Americans is not limited to their experience as consumers.
On the same day as the Starbucks arrests, a 14-year-old black boy who got lost in a Detroit suburban neighbourhood on his way to school was shot at by a white homeowner after knocking on the man’s door to ask for directions. Recorded police shootings of unarmed black men in places like Ferguson, Baltimore and Charleston have had a similar dynamic.
Katie Adams said she has spent hours at her local Starbucks, sometimes drinking only free water — without incident.
“I’ve never been refused service for not making a purchase,” said Adams, a 32-year-old mom and student, who is white and lives in Hanford, California, outside of Fresno. “If my skin colour was different, I feel like I would be approached.”
Adams said she was upset after watching the Starbucks video, calling the incident was “unfair and ridiculous.” Still, as a mini-storage employee, she said she has been aware of her own bias at times in dealing with customers but works to keep it in check.
“A lot of times I can feel myself saying, ‘I don’t want to rent to this person,”‘ Adams said. “As a white person, I have to tell myself, ‘This is a regular person, just like me.’ There’s no reason for me to assume anything until I’ve spoken with them and gotten to know them a little better. But as much as you don’t want to pre-judge someone it’s there. You’re going to do it, whether you act on it or not.”
[youtube]pFRP7QwlIH0[/youtube]
‘Retail racism’: Starbucks incident highlights perils of shopping while black | Toronto Sun
 
White_Unifier
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by spaminator View Post

Starbucks CEO apologizes for arrest of 2 black men waiting for friend
Associated Press
More from Associated Press
Published:
April 15, 2018
Updated:
April 15, 2018 4:59 PM EDT
(Twitter video screenshot)
PHILADELPHIA — Starbucks sells itself as a community gathering spot as much as a coffeehouse, a welcoming place with comfortable chairs for lingering, trendy music and Wi-Fi. That’s one reason the arrest of two black men who were sitting in a Starbucks struck a nerve for so many: They were doing exactly what people do at most any of the chain’s 28,000 stores worldwide.
The CEO of Starbucks Co., Kevin Johnson, called the arrests a “reprehensible outcome” and said he wants to personally apologize to the men, saying the company “stands firmly against discrimination or racial profiling.” But that didn’t stop protesters from gathering Sunday outside the store in downtown Philadelphia where the arrests occurred.
As people ordered coffee inside, the Rev. Jeffrey Jordan led a crowd of a couple dozen in chants of “I am somebody, and I demand equality now.”
“It is a shame that (in) the year 2018 we’re still putting up with this mess,” said Jordan. “This country was built on the backs of black and brown people and now Starbucks is going to treat us like we’re second-class.”
In Washington, D.C., Gregory Wilkins usually visits one of three neighbourhood Starbucks for about 45 minutes before work to read the paper with his coffee or smoke a cigarette at the outside tables. Wilkins, who is black, said he’d consider going elsewhere if something like the incident in Philadelphia occurred again.
“If nothing is done about what happened, then yeah,” Wilkins, 56, said as he went into a Starbucks.
The arrests, which occurred Thursday, were captured on video that quickly gained traction on social media.
Video shows several police talking quietly with two black men seated at a table. After a few minutes, officers handcuff the men and lead them outside as other customers say they weren’t doing anything wrong; Philadelphia-area media reported the two had been waiting for a friend.
Officers went to the store after Starbucks employees called 911 to report the men were trespassing, said Police Commissioner Richard Ross. He said officers were told the men had come in and asked to use the restroom but were denied because they hadn’t bought anything. He said they then refused to leave.
Johnson’s statement didn’t address exactly what led to the police call, but a Starbucks spokeswoman said the store where the arrests occurred has a policy that restrooms are for paying customers only. In the video, no Starbucks items are visible in front of either of the men.
Protester Soren Mcclay, 14, (C) demonstrates outside a Center City Starbucks on April 15, 2018 in Philadelphia, Pa. (Mark Makela/Getty Images)
Robert Passikoff, the president of a New York-based consulting firm that researches brand loyalty, said companies like Starbucks are in a tough spot as they attempt to operate both as both community centres and places where people are expected to make a purchase.
“Companies have gone out of their way to establish the kind of emotional bonds and product delivery that they think is going to build engagement and loyalty and, ultimately, profits,” said Passikoff, of Brand Keys Inc. “But today the consumer decides what is right. They have become magnets for social experiences, in the broad sense of ’social,’ but not in the sense that ’Oh, I need to buy something.”’
Johnson said the company’s practices and training led to a “bad outcome,” and the reason for the call that brought police into the shop was incorrect.
“Our store manager never intended for these men to be arrested and this should never have escalated as it did,” said his statement. Johnson said videos of the arrest were “very hard to watch,” and the company was investigating.
Starbucks Mid-Atlantic Regional Vice President Camille Hymes (R)addresses protesters and media in a Center City Starbucks on April 15, 2018 in Philadelphia, Pa. (Mark Makela/Getty Images)
Johnson said the company would further train workers on when to call police and host a company-wide meeting to “underscore our long-standing commitment to treating one another with respect and dignity.”
Protester Jack Willis, 26, (C) demonstrates outside a Starbucks on April 15, 2018 in Philadelphia, Pa. (Mark Makela/Getty Images)
Police haven’t released the names of the men who were arrested. A spokesman for the district attorney’s office said the two were released “because of lack of evidence” that a crime had been committed, but declined further comment, citing a police investigation.
At the protest, Wendy Mial vowed to never enter another Starbucks. Mial, 53, said she was “devastated” by the arrests and urged the small crowd not to the “choose the wrong enemy.”
“The enemy, in some ways, is ourselves,” she said. “Look how few people are here today. Who’s not outraged about this?”
A group of people observe protesters demonstrating outside a Center City Starbucks on April 15, 2018 in Philadelphia, Pa. (Mark Makela/Getty Images)
Starbucks CEO apologizes for arrest of 2 black men waiting for friend | Toronto Sun

Was either of the black men wearing a black leather jacket or a baseball cap worn to the side or owned a nice car? Was either of them growing dreads? If so, what more proof did the store need? especially if either of them spoke with an accent. I mean, an accent is a dead give-away of criminality
 
EagleSmack
#7
Right in Philadelphia.

One day shutdown... not nearly enough for Starbucks.
 
Walter
+1
#8
Was the Starbucks Incident a Setup?
https://www.americanthinker.com/arti...t_a_setup.html
 
EagleSmack
+2
#9  Top Rated Post
I don't care if it was a setup. I love watching liberal businesses get exposed for the racist they are.
 
Walter
+2
#10
The prog elite wanted Starbucks to know who was in charge.

Like the Mafia cutting off a pinkie to keep someone in line.
 
EagleSmack
+1
#11
Starbucks... White Elite Liberal Coffee Shop at it again!

Starbucks Facing More Racism Allegations After Latino Customer Receives Cup With ‘Beaner’ On The Label « CBS Los Angeles


Man Libs are sooooooo racist!
 
Hoid
#12
If they didn't want to be arrested they shouldn't have been black.
 
EagleSmack
+1
#13
I see the liberal racist has joined the thread.
 
Hoid
#14
^walter agrees
 
EagleSmack
#15
Libs coming to the defense of a known racist company. Not surprised.
 
petros
#16
Starbucks where people of colour serve white people.
 
EagleSmack
#17
Starbucks Says Drug Use, Sleeping Unacceptable as It Clarifies Guest Policy

Company’s statement is second attempt to explain its new policy following complaints that it would turn cafes into homeless shelters and drug havens


http://www.wsj.com/articles/starbuck...icy-1526918854

What a mess they've created.
 
Walter
+1
#18
Starbucks Dies at 47; Took Specialty Coffee Mainstream
https://townhall.com/columnists/bobb...tream-n2485369
 
Twin_Moose
+1
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

Starbucks Dies at 47; Took Specialty Coffee Mainstream
https://townhall.com/columnists/bobb...tream-n2485369

 
Hoid
#20
It's a shame. I enjoy their free wifi
 
spaminator
#21
Starbucks employee fired after mocking stuttering customer
Associated Press
More from Associated Press
Published:
July 5, 2018
Updated:
July 5, 2018 3:41 PM EDT
(Tan Lekwijit/Facebook)
NEW YORK — Starbucks says an employee in Philadelphia has been fired after reportedly mocking a customer with a stutter.
The coffee chain says the behaviour did not reflect the experience customers should have and the employee is no longer with Starbucks.
A person on Facebook posted Sunday that his friend stuttered when giving his name, and that the barista made light of it verbally and then spelled the name with extra letters. The customer with the stutter emailed Starbucks and was offered $5 as an apology, according to the post. Starbucks said Thursday that was not the ideal response, and that it has since apologized to the person directly.
In May, Starbucks held anti-racial bias training for thousands of U.S. employees after a worker at another Philadelphia store called police on two black men waiting for a friend. The incident was a major embarrassment.

http://torontosun.com/news/world/sta...ering-customer