Always demand a receipt or in a case like this


tay
#1
pay be cheque only as proof of payment..........


Several hundred customers of GoodLife Fitness are learning they may have been the victims of fraud after the memberships they paid for were never legitimately registered with the company.

Francesco Campo told CityNews he first signed up with GoodLife Fitness in 2016, handing over $435 in cash to Leanna Habil, who was general manager at the Richmond Hill facility at the time. When he went to renew his membership in January, he was told the cost would be only $390 this time around. Three weeks later, Campo was denied access to the fitness centre after being told there was no record of his paid membership.

Campo was then informed that Habil was no longer with the company.

It appears Campo was not the only one affected by the alleged scam.

A GoodLife spokeswoman told CityNews approximately 275 members were duped out of almost $125,000. The issue came to light after the company identified what it calls “irregular banking activity” for one of its members.

“We are very sorry for their experience and are doing all that we can to make this situation right for them,” Tracy Matthews, executive director of membership services said in an email.

Matthews said the company is planning to honour the memberships that were sold by Habil.

She added GoodLife has launched an internal investigation and is taking “swift and appropriate action” against Habil.

In a telephone interview with CityNews, Habil denied the allegations, saying the memberships were pre-approved by other managers at GoodLife. She said she has receipts of all the pre-payments made to her.

GoodLife disputes those claims, saying it has proof that Habil received money from members which was never forwarded to the company.

The Ministry of Government and Consumer Services said anyone with any questions can call Consumer Protection Ontario at 1-800-889-9768 or email consumer@ontario.ca .

Under Ontario’s Consumer Protection Act, gym members who have to pay in advance and the total payment obligation exceeds $50, have the right to:

Almost 300 customers allegedly defrauded of GoodLife memberships - 680 NEWS
 
Jinentonix
#2
I'm sorry but, how goddam stupid do you have to be to hand over cash without getting a receipt?
 
IdRatherBeSkiing
#3
Or to hand over cash period. If some body told me that they expected cash not credit, my alarm bells would be ringing.
 
Durry
#4
Copy/paste

This is a heads up for everyone regarding the latest in Visa fraud. Royal Bank received this communication about the newest scam. This is happening in the Midwest right now and moving across the country.

The scam works like this:

Person calling says - 'This is (name) and I'm calling from the Security and Fraud Department at VISA. My Badge number is 12460, your card has been flagged for an unusual purchase pattern, and I'm calling to verify. This would be on your VISA card which was issued by (name of bank). Did you purchase an Anti-Telemarketing Device for $497.99 from a marketing company based in Arizona ?' When you say 'No', the caller continues with, 'Then we will be issuing a credit to your account. This is a company we have been watching, and the charges range from $297 to $497, just under the $500 purchase pattern that flags most cards. Before your next statement, the credit will be sent to (gives you your address). Is that correct?' You say 'yes'.

The caller continues - 'I will be starting a Fraud Investigation. If you have any questions, you should call the 1- 800 number listed on the back of your card (1-800-VISA) and ask for Security. You will need to refer to this Control Number. The caller then gives you a 6 digit number. 'Do you need me to read it again?'

Here's the IMPORTANT part on how the scam works - The caller then says, 'I need to verify you are in possession of your card'. He'll ask you to 'turn your card over and look for some numbers'. There are 7 numbers; the first 4 are part of your card number, the last 3 are the Security Numbers that verify you are the possessor of the card. These are the numbers you sometimes use to make Internet purchases to prove you have the card. The caller will ask you to read the last 3 numbers to him. After you tell the caller the 3 numbers, he'll say, 'That is correct, I just needed to verify that the card has not been lost or stolen, and that you still have your card. Do you have any other questions?'

After you say no, the caller then thanks you and states, 'Don't hesitate to call back if you do', and hangs up. You actually say very little, and they never ask for or tell you the card number. But after we were called on Wednesday, we called back within 20 minutes to ask a question. We were glad we did! The REAL VISA Security Department told us it was a scam and in the last 15 minutes a new purchase of $497.99 was charged to our card. We made a real fraud report and closed the VISA account. VISA is reissuing us a new number. What the Scammer wants is the 3-digit PIN number on the back of the card. Don't give it to them . Instead, tell them you'll call VISA or Master Card directly for verification of their conversation.

The real VISA told us that they will never ask for anything on the card, as they already know the information, since they issued the card! If you give the Scammer your 3 Digit PIN Number, you think you're receiving a credit. However, by the time you get your statement you'll see charges for purchases you didn't make, and by then it's almost too late and/or more difficult to actually file a fraud report.

What makes this more remarkable is that on Thursday, I got a call from a 'Jason Richardson of MasterCard' with a word-for-word repeat of the VISA Scam. This time I didn't let him finish. I hung up! We filed a police report, as instructed by VISA. The police said they are taking several of these reports daily! They also urged us to tell everybody we know that this scam is happening. I dealt with a similar situation this morning, with the caller telling me that $3,097 had been charged to my account for plane tickets to Spain , and so on through the above routine.

It appears that this is a very active scam, and evidently quite successful....
 
Jinentonix
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by IdRatherBeSkiing View Post

Or to hand over cash period. If some body told me that they expected cash not credit, my alarm bells would be ringing.

Not mine, unless they were reluctant to issue a receipt.