Crews find ancient aboriginal bones along pipeline route


petros
+3
#31
Go west means to go gay but yeah what the hell add going south in there too.
 
SLM
+2
#32
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Go west means to go gay but yeah what the hell add going south in there too.

Nothing wrong with going gay anyway...Yeah Pride!

 
Goober
#33
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Go west means to go gay but yeah what the hell add going south in there too.

Did not know that one. Must be a western term?????
 
petros
#34
Quote: Originally Posted by Goober View Post

Did not know that one. Must be a western term?????

Nope. It's an old term too. There are even songs about it.
 
hunboldt
#35
Quote: Originally Posted by EagleSmack View Post

I am all for stopping work when archeological finds are discovered.

I have been involved in stoppages like this. Most of the finds we have are Colonial Era and it is pretty interesting seeing them.

That is a really good point. After the An'ini burnt South Branch House on the Saskatchewan in 1792, they fought a protracted running fight eventually ending up n Montana. There are An'ini graves on my Grandfathers lands, and we never broke the graves areas for crops.

Do we tell the FSA or Indian Affairs? Not on your life. The Ani'ni elders know, and that's it.

Northern Saskatchewan farmers have a pretty good record, in the ethnic blocs, of protecting native graves form disturbance. One of my third cousins set aside a quarter section as a nature preserve, with the graves inside it.

There are very few traces of the pre European settlement in Sask, and a lot of room to re route pipelines.
 
petros
+5
#36  Top Rated Post
The lawn at the cemetery gets mowed weekly. If somebody is buried beneath my land they can keep on pushing canola like the dead in the weekly mowed cemetery push daisies.
 
Cliffy
+1
#37
Funny how people get upset about disturbing a settler grave yard and call it hollowed ground, but a native burial site is fair game. People in the Slocan Valley used to find aboriginal skulls, exposed by river undercutting a bank where a native burial site was, and put the skulls on the fence post marking the entry to their driveways. Thought it was cool, until the Sinixt came home.
 
petros
+2
#38
This wasn't a "sacred burial place". if it were, it would still be active and marked like a cemetery that gets mowed weekly. The bones will come in handy for archeologists and the line will go through.

There is nothing to jump up and down about.
 
CDNBear
+1
#39
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

The bones will come in handy for archeologists and the line will go through.

Ya, that's pretty much what the article said...

Quote:

There is nothing to jump up and down about.

That's probably why people had to start making stuff up.
 
petros
+1
#40
Probably.
 
CDNBear
+1
#41
I should have slipped something in about the RCMP, weapons and illegal tobacco, just to satisfy their desires.

I'll remember next time.
 
petros
#42
That'll help.
 
darkbeaver
+1
#43
Quote: Originally Posted by CDNBear View Post

bones and determined they are human remains which predate European contact.

RCMP said analysis indicated the bones date back more than 1000 years.

This is forensically proven by DNA analysis not to be the case,however it in no way cancels the sanctity of all burial sites. There was awhole lotta transmigration goin on before and after 12500 BC.
 
petros
+2
#44
Quote: Originally Posted by darkbeaver View Post

There was awhole lotta transmigration goin on before and after 12500 BC.

Which is why the bones are extremely historically valuable.
 
CDNBear
+1
#45
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Which is why the bones are extremely historically valuable.

Nah, just smash them with an excavator and move on.
 
hunboldt
#46
Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

Funny how people get upset about disturbing a settler grave yard and call it hollowed ground, but a native burial site is fair game. People in the Slocan Valley used to find aboriginal skulls, exposed by river undercutting a bank where a native burial site was, and put the skulls on the fence post marking the entry to their driveways. Thought it was cool, until the Sinixt came home.


Cliffy not everybody. My people got 'de-nationed' in the great European upheavals. We protected native graves on our lands in Saskatchewan.. In the Old lands, ours got bulldozed. Remove all traces. So its not just natives.

there's a big Anin 'I burial site , protected by PFRA lands, North west of Lanigan. You don't get the gate locks unless the range riders know who you are.

Quote: Originally Posted by Goober View Post

There are laws and regs they are required to follow. You have a problem with the rule of law when First Nations are involved?


Goober, you haven't had to deal with the FSA. Or Indian Affairs Smart farmers just set the graves off as pasture and don't tell anyone. Saves the do- gooders driving you crazy.

Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

The lawn at the cemetery gets mowed weekly. If somebody is buried beneath my land they can keep on pushing canola like the dead in the weekly mowed cemetery push daisies.


You zero till your land. That's fine by me..
 
Nuggler
+1
#47
Quote: Originally Posted by CDNBear View Post

Crews find ancient aboriginal bones along pipeline route

CBC News

The discovery of ancient aboriginal remains has led to a temporary shut down in the construction of a gas pipeline near Moose Jaw.

TransGas, a SaskEnergy company, is building a new natural gas connection for the K+S potash mine in the area.

A contracted trackhoe operator who was digging a trench spotted the bones one week ago. Archaeologists have since examined the bones and determined they are human remains which predate European contact.

RCMP said analysis indicated the bones date back more than 1000 years.

The discovery has SaskEnergy putting the work on hold while the situation is assessed.


Woops !!! Anyone for a 500 mile detour ??
 
CDNBear
+1
#48
Quote: Originally Posted by hunboldt View Post

Goober, you haven't had to deal with the FSA. Or Indian Affairs Smart farmers just set the graves off as pasture and don't tell anyone. Saves the do- gooders driving you crazy.

Must be a regional thing.

There have been many archaeological finds from Aurora to Georgian Bay, and they've never caused any "do-gooders" to drive anyone crazy. And I actually know a farmer in Bradford who had his horse training track dug up and all the artifacts removed by a University and reps from the Rama Band.

Not only did it not cause any craziness, he was compensated for his time, and presented with a gift for his efforts.

I guess it all boils down to people attitudes, prejudices and/or ignorance.

Quote: Originally Posted by Nuggler View Post

Woops !!! Anyone for a 500 mile detour ??

I doubt that.
 
Nuggler
#49
Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

Funny how people get upset about disturbing a settler grave yard and call it hollowed ground, but a native burial site is fair game. People in the Slocan Valley used to find aboriginal skulls, exposed by river undercutting a bank where a native burial site was, and put the skulls on the fence post marking the entry to their driveways. Thought it was cool, until the Sinixt came home.


Bullsh*t, Cliffie.

A fella found some bones while plowing and had to HIRE A ****ING ARCHEOLOGIST TEAM to do a dig. I gotta link somewhere.

Around here you find arrowheads, don't tell anyone.
 
CDNBear
#50
Quote: Originally Posted by Nuggler View Post

Bullsh*t, Cliffie.

A fella found some bones while plowing and had to HIRE A ****ING ARCHEOLOGIST TEAM to do a dig. I gotta link somewhere.

I remember you posting that link, I still say it makes no sense. I've never heard of it before or since.

Most Universities would beat down your door to do it for free.

Quote:

Around here you find arrowheads, don't tell anyone.

They pop up around these parts all the time, it's never been an issue to talk about them.

There's even an old settlement under water at my friends cottage, from where a multitude of arrowheads and other artifacts have washed ashore. It's common knowledge in the area, with many of the finds hung on walls, including the general store.
 
Cliffy
+1
#51
Quote: Originally Posted by Nuggler View Post

Bullsh*t, Cliffie.

A fella found some bones while plowing and had to HIRE A ****ING ARCHEOLOGIST TEAM to do a dig. I gotta link somewhere.

Around here you find arrowheads, don't tell anyone.

After the archaeological did at Valican, residents of the Slocan Valley formed the Valican Archaeological Society and talked the BC government to by the land from a land developer. It is the only piece of land bought by the Heritage Branch of Lands and Forests that was not Victorian architecture. Shortly after that, I was hired by the government to caretake the site to prevent vandalism. Shortly after that I went to Kettle Falls in Washington state with a friend to meet with the Sinixt elders to appraise them of the situation and to ask them to come home and take care of business. They have been occupying the site since 1989. They were the first tribe to have the bones of their ancestors returned from museums for repatriation (reburial on the Valican site) in Canada (that I know of).
Last edited by Cliffy; Oct 27th, 2013 at 02:00 PM..
 
SLM
+1
#52
Quote: Originally Posted by Nuggler View Post

Bullsh*t, Cliffie.

A fella found some bones while plowing and had to HIRE A ****ING ARCHEOLOGIST TEAM to do a dig. I gotta link somewhere.

Around here you find arrowheads, don't tell anyone.

Quote: Originally Posted by CDNBear View Post

I remember you posting that link, I still say it makes no sense. I've never heard of it before or since.

Most Universities would beat down your door to do it for free.

They pop up around these parts all the time, it's never been an issue to talk about them.

There's even an old settlement under water at my friends cottage, from where a multitude of arrowheads and other artifacts have washed ashore. It's common knowledge in the area, with many of the finds hung on walls, including the general store.

This one?

Sarnia couple receives $5000 bill after remains found in backyard | Globalnews.ca

I remembered because it's not far from me.
 
CDNBear
#53
Quote: Originally Posted by SLM View Post

This one?

Sarnia couple receives $5000 bill after remains found in backyard | Globalnews.ca

I remembered because it's not far from me.

Thanks...

Sauve said she’s heard that people from the nearby Aamjiwnaang First Nation are raising money to pay the bill, but they haven’t approached her directly.

400-year-old skeleton of aboriginal woman found in Sarnia backyard costs couple $5,000 | Toronto Star

I suspect that that is common place. I have no direct knowledge, but I'll ask the next time we go to a ceremony.

Ont, Sask, BC and PEI are the only provinces that pass the bill to the property owner.

I bet when I look into this, I find that if the body is determined to be Aboriginal, the nearest First Nations Band picks up the tab. Being in their best interest.

Like most news stories, it's more sensational to avoid presenting all the facts.
Last edited by CDNBear; Oct 27th, 2013 at 02:04 PM..
 
SLM
+1
#54
Quote: Originally Posted by CDNBear View Post

Thanks...

Sauve said she’s heard that people from the nearby Aamjiwnaang First Nation are raising money to pay the bill, but they haven’t approached her directly.

400-year-old skeleton of aboriginal woman found in Sarnia backyard costs couple $5,000 | Toronto Star

I suspect that that is common place. I have no direct knowledge, but I'll ask the next time we go to a ceremony.

Ont, Sask, BC and PEI are the only provinces that pass the bill to the property owner.

I bet when I look into this, I find that if the body is determined to be Aboriginal, the nearest First Nations Band picks up the tab. Being in their best interest.

Like most news stories, it's more sensational to avoid presenting all the facts.

I just assumed, and I could be wrong, that if it was really that commonplace that homeowners/landowners got slapped with the tab we'd be hearing about it all over the place. I seem to recall seeing articles over the years about remains of pioneers being found in and around my area as well, but I've never heard of the landowner being sent a bill.
 
hunboldt
#55
Quote: Originally Posted by Nuggler View Post

Bullsh*t, Cliffie.

A fella found some bones while plowing and had to HIRE A ****ING ARCHEOLOGIST TEAM to do a dig. I gotta link somewhere.

Around here you find arrowheads, don't tell anyone.


While things have , hopefully, changed from the 1990's when I knew landowners who ran up against the FSA battalions and paid out of pocket and time without recompense, the end result is a lot of sites that don't get excavated by archeologists, and a lot of sites that just get plowed under.
The FSA in the 1990's couldn't grasp the fact that family farms were hanging g on in lean years, and a family farmer can't just attend a hearing during seeding, haying and harvesting. Yet you can be penalised for 'not attending. '

And no, Native organizations don't re-emburse white landowners.


I notice that racism crept into this discussion, and that is a load of nonsense.
 
taxslave
+1
#56
In Europe, where you cant piss without hitting an historic site of some kind they send archological teams ahead along the route to map and remove anything of interest. Then in Bc we have cliffy and his merry band of freeloaders that hold a protest or demand a halt if someone even mentions work. I know from experience that you do NOT want to find anything when logging or you will be shut down without compensation for at least months if not forever while the forestry holds your deposit money.
 
CDNBear
#57
Quote: Originally Posted by hunboldt View Post

While things have , hopefully, changed from the 1990's when I knew landowners who ran up against the FSA battalions and paid out of pocket and time without recompense, the end result is a lot of sites that don't get excavated by archeologists, and a lot of sites that just get plowed under.

Where abouts?

Ontario?
Alberta?
BC?
Manitoba?
Sask?
Quote:

The FSA in the 1990's couldn't grasp the fact that family farms were hanging g on in lean years, and a family farmer can't just attend a hearing during seeding, haying and harvesting. Yet you can be penalised for 'not attending. '

What is this FSA you keep going on about?

Quote:

And no, Native organizations don't re-emburse white landowners.

Despite a report to the contrary. I'm sorry, but you've been wrong so many times, I'm just simply more apt to accept MSM articles at face value, over your opinions.

Quote:

I notice that racism crept into this discussion, and that is a load of nonsense.

Of course it's nonsense, it just doesn't exist in your tiny world...
 
Tecumsehsbones
+1
#58
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

In Europe, where you cant piss without hitting an historic site of some kind they send archological teams ahead along the route to map and remove anything of interest. Then in Bc we have cliffy and his merry band of freeloaders that hold a protest or demand a halt if someone even mentions work. I know from experience that you do NOT want to find anything when logging or you will be shut down without compensation for at least months if not forever while the forestry holds your deposit money.

Umm. . . you can't piss anywhere in the Americas without hitting an historic site. It's just not a history you recognise as significant or valid. The Americas have been occupied by humans twice as long as Britain or Ireland.

Maybe if you took the same measures as the Europeans, you wouldn't have "freeloaders" protesting.
 
Zipperfish
#59
Quote: Originally Posted by Durry View Post

It seems that either the environmentalists or Archaeologists are always looking for reasons to stop people from doing their jobs.

Time to put a stop to this nonsense !!

Obviously somebody didn't see Amityville Horror and Pet Semetary. You can't just build on an Indian burial ground.