How socialism turned oil-rich Venezuela into a basket case


Hoid
+1
#151
I wonder how socialism helped oil-rich Norway become the most successful country in history?

Maybe a climate scientist could explain...
 
Theend
-1
#152
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

Ain't socialism grand? And to think there are people that want to do the same to Canada.

It wasn't Socialism, nice try. Bad outlook on the future, investment etc...but mostly it was the imperialist evil jews who run America.

Sanctions, government CIA agents ruining there country.
Agents that have been planted there for years. Spreading lies, lies, lies... PHUKKIN TERRORIST JEWS...
 
Theend
-1
#153
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

I wonder how socialism helped oil-rich Norway become the most successful country in history?
Maybe a climate scientist could explain...

Right on. They didn't interfere with Norway.... the way they do in Africa, S.America...... and phukked my life and alit of others in North America.....

That's why China took over. We should have been all united, instead of bickering for the last 200 years.... Zionist media.... Lies,
 
MHz
#154
Sure, a certain city that the founders of South Africa came from was the only city in Europe that would not extradite bankrupt 'persons' to any Nation, aka 'bankers', made the climate favorable so that in 1600-1650 they were able to kill of Portugal and take over their trade routes. That climate is still going strong.
Any Questions??
 
Walter
+1
#155
Venezuela’s Maduro celebrates 2nd term as crisis deepens
https://apnews.com/f1df9924783f49859874f5fc97f0f534

The basket continues to be woven.
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
+3
#156
Canada getting closer to a war with Venezuela

Canada's ties to Venezuela hanging by a thread as clash escalates

Quote:

Relations between Canada and Venezuela took a sudden plunge today as Ottawa appeared to reject an ultimatum issued by President Nicolas Maduro on the eve of his second inauguration.
The dispute began with a letter sent by the Lima Group of 13 nations (12 in Latin America and the Caribbean, plus Canada) declaring Maduro's election undemocratic and illegitimate, and appealing to him not to take office today.
Maduro rejected that appeal and went on television to issue an ultimatum to what he called "the Lima Cartel": retract that letter within 48 hours or his government will take "crude, urgent and energetic measures." He also claimed that Venezuela was experiencing a coup attempt backed by its foreign enemies.
He made it clear that the measures he was considering were diplomatic, leading some observers to wonder if he intends to finally break relations and expel diplomats.
And a senior official at Global Affairs Canada told CBC News the department is bracing for the possible expulsion of diplomats and breaking of ties on Friday. "We are very well prepared for any and all eventualities tomorrow," the official said, when asked about the logistics of getting Canadian staff out of Venezuela in the event of a break.
Just under 24 hours later, Canada's Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland shot back with some of the harshest language her government has ever used against another nation:
"Today, Nicolás Maduro's regime loses any remaining appearance of legitimacy," she said in a written statement. "Having seized power through fraudulent and anti-democratic elections held on May 20, 2018, the Maduro regime is now fully entrenched as a dictatorship. The suffering of Venezuelans will only worsen should he continue to illegitimately cling to power.
"Together with other like-minded countries in the Lima Group, Canada rejects the legitimacy of the new presidential term of Nicolás Maduro. We call on him to immediately cede power to the democratically-elected National Assembly until new elections are held, which must include the participation of all political actors and follow the release of all political prisoners in Venezuela."
Canada recognizes young opposition leader
Freeland went on to say that Canada now considers the only legitimate authority in Venezuela to be the National Assembly that was elected in 2015. That assembly currently operates without any real authority after Venezuela's Supreme Tribunal of Justice — packed with supporters of Maduro's United Venezuelan Socialist Party — stripped it of its powers.
Those powers have been transferred to a new "constituent assembly" that is appointed, rather than elected.
"Canada congratulates Juan Guaidó, who on January 5, 2019, assumed the Presidency of the National Assembly," wrote Freeland. "As the only remaining democratically-elected institution in the country, the National Assembly must continue to play a crucial role in keeping Venezuela's democracy alive. Canadians stand with the people of Venezuela and their desire to restore democracy and human rights in Venezuela."
Guaidó is a 35-year-old engineer who serves as a congressman for the opposition Popular Will Party. He was elected to head the National Assembly by the often-fractious group of opposition parties that have dominated it since 2015.
Foreign Minister Freeland spoke with Guaidó by telephone Wednesday to communicate Canada's support for him.
As head of the assembly, he is now considered Venezuela's most senior legitimate official by most countries of the hemisphere. Bolivia, Cuba, Ecuador, El Salvador, Mexico, Nicaragua and Uruguay are recognizing Maduro's second term, though their expressions of support range from enthusiastic (Cuba and El Salvador) to hesitant and muted (Ecuador, Mexico and Uruguay).
In remarks made in the capital Caracas, Guaidó said that Maduro had "stolen the symbols of power and given himself a paper crown." Flanked by other deputies, Guiadó said Maduro's inauguration showed he was backed by "only four or five countries. The whole world has come together to reject him...
"Today, Venezuela has no legitimate leader. Today, Venezuela's armed forces have no commander-in-chief."
The congressional leader also called on the country's armed forces, "those who wear the uniform with pride and haven't allowed themselves to be corrupted," to stand by their oath to defend constitutional order in Venezuela.
"The chain of command is broken," he said. "How is Maduro going to be able to appoint ambassadors, and have their credentials recognized, when other governments don't even recognize him?"
"Unanimity" against Maduro
The senior official with Global Affairs Canada said that Maduro was issuing threats from a position of weakness rather than strength. "There's unanimity in the hemisphere and elsewhere. The European Union has also spoken out very strongly.
"Maduro wouldn't be speaking publicly this way if he wasn't feeling the pressure."
The official also praised the government of Jamaica for its decision this week to nationalize the 49 per cent stake that Venezuela's state oil company holds in the island's Petrojam. The government of Jamaica, which is not part of the Lima Group, accused the Maduro government of not living up to its commitments to help modernize Jamaica's oil industry.
The Canadian official praised the boldness of the move. "There are real financial risks for them" in the hostile takeover, he said, adding it was another sign of the growing isolation of the Maduro regime.
New sanctions
The Lima Group statement that infuriated Maduro also announced a number of new measures against his regime.
Canada, Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Panama, Paraguay, Peru and Saint Lucia all agreed to declare senior Maduro regime officials persona non grata in their national territories, bar all arms transfers to Venezuela, forbid overflights by Venezuelan military aircraft and use their influence at international institutions — such as the International Monetary Fund and World Bank — to prevent Venezuela from getting loans.
Paraguay followed up on the statement by breaking diplomatic relations with Venezuela completely.
The 13 nations also warned Venezuela about an incident just before Christmas in which Venezuelan Navy patrol vessels approached and chased away a Norwegian oil-exploration vessel conducting a seismic survey in what Guyana says are its territorial waters.
A dispute over the marine boundary between Guyana and Venezuela has heated up recently following indications of major undersea oil deposits. Venezuela's own oil-dependent economy is in free-fall due to a combination of low prices, under-investment, corruption and government incompetence that has led to a steep drop in production.

Look who is back on her twitterpodium threatening another foreign country
 
petros
+1
#157
.....
 
pgs
Free Thinker
+1
#158
Quote: Originally Posted by Twin_Moose View Post

Canada getting closer to a war with Venezuela

Canada's ties to Venezuela hanging by a thread as clash escalates



Look who is back on her twitterpodium threatening another foreign country

Maybe if we conquer them Victoria can get the compensation they are looking for .
 
MHz
#159
With that kind of shit coming out of the mouth of Canadian stooges it is a good thing Russia got there first. How long before all our tundra would belong to Russia, 2 hrs tops? That would solve the issue the west has with Ottawa as a smoking hole in the ground isn't a threat to anybody.
Here is where her 'outrage' came from.
https://sputniknews.com/us/201901121...maduro-bolton/
MOSCOW (Sputnik) - The United States does not recognize the legitimacy of powers of Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro, who was inaugurated earlier this week, US National Security Adviser John Bolton said.
"The United States does not recognize Venezuelan dictator Nicolas Maduro’s illegitimate claim to power. His 'election' in May 2018 was viewed internationally as not free, fair or credible," Bolton said in a statement issued by the White House press service on Friday. "We hold the illegitimate Maduro regime directly responsible for the safety of all Venezuelans who cry out demanding to freely choose their leaders. We will continue to use the full weight of United States economic and diplomatic power to press for the restoration of a Venezuelan democracy that reverses the current constitutional crisis," Bolton pointed out.
Last edited by MHz; Jan 11th, 2019 at 10:58 PM..
 
darkbeaver
Republican
#160
Bolton! ha ha ha ha ha
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
#161
Quote: Originally Posted by MHz View Post

With that kind of shit coming out of the mouth of Canadian stooges it is a good thing Russia got there first. How long before all our tundra would belong to Russia, 2 hrs tops? That would solve the issue the west has with Ottawa as a smoking hole in the ground isn't a threat to anybody.
Here is where her 'outrage' came from.
https://sputniknews.com/us/201901121...maduro-bolton/
MOSCOW (Sputnik) - The United States does not recognize the legitimacy of powers of Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro, who was inaugurated earlier this week, US National Security Adviser John Bolton said.
"The United States does not recognize Venezuelan dictator Nicolas Maduro’s illegitimate claim to power. His 'election' in May 2018 was viewed internationally as not free, fair or credible," Bolton said in a statement issued by the White House press service on Friday. "We hold the illegitimate Maduro regime directly responsible for the safety of all Venezuelans who cry out demanding to freely choose their leaders. We will continue to use the full weight of United States economic and diplomatic power to press for the restoration of a Venezuelan democracy that reverses the current constitutional crisis," Bolton pointed out.

What does Russia or the US have to do with LIMA?
 
MHz
#162
Peru was subject to the same level of 'control', nothing has changed hands. Is this part of your 'question'?
https://www.mintpressnews.com/the-sc...squads/204655/
From the SOA to WHINSEC

Established in 1946 in Panama, the SOA was responsible for training over 64,000 South American soldiers, many of whom later became notorious torturers and murderers in death squads. According to former Panamanian President Jorge Illueca, the SOA was the “biggest base for destabilization in Latin America.”
Expelled from Panama in 1984, the SOA relocated to Fort Benning, Georgia, and was renamed WHINSEC in 2001, allowing for an apparent termination of the previous program through dissociation. In reality, however, WHINSEC retained its SOA foundations and the U.S. Department of Defense has shielded the institute from criticism and outcry with regard to the school’s historical link to human rights violations.
In its mission statement, WHINSEC claims to have been founded upon the Charter of the Organization of American States and pledges to “foster mutual knowledge, transparency, confidence, and cooperation among the participating nations and promote democratic values, respect for human rights, and knowledge and understanding of U.S. customs and traditions.”
These values, according to WHINSEC’s website, are imparted through a three-lesson Ethics Program, as well as the Democracy and Human Rights Program — the latter dealing with “the universal prohibitions against torture, extrajudicial executions and forced disappearances.”

A far cry from protecting human rights

CIA and U.S. Army manuals detailing torture techniques translated into Spanish and utilized by the SOA are a far cry from anything containing human rights protections. Indeed, as SOA Watch explains, “These manuals advocated torture, extortion, blackmail and the targeting of civilian populations.”
The manuals, written in the 1950s and 1960s, “were distributed for use in countries such as El Salvador, Guatemala, Ecuador and Peru, and at the School of the Americas between 1987 and 1991.” Indeed, in-depth research and testimony from torture survivors relay more than just a depiction of torture practiced by SOA graduates in South America during dictatorship eras, such as Chile under Pinochet. Sadistic torture practiced upon detainees at Abu Ghraib is also reflective of the CIA torture manuals and torture previously carried out on detainees in South America.
Since 2000 and the renaming of the SOA, other crimes linked to SOA graduates have come to light.
Col. Byron Lima Estrada was convicted in June 2001 of murdering Guatemalan Bishop Juan Jose Gerardi following the publication of a report insisting the Guatemalan army was responsible for the murder of almost 200,000 people in the civil war that took place from 1960 to 1996.
Two SOA graduates, Venezuelan Army Commander in Chief Efrain Vasquez and Gen. Ramirez Poveda, were involved in the failed 2002 coup against President Hugo Chávez. According to SOA Watch, Otto Reich, then-assistant secretary of State for Western Hemisphere Affairs, was “appointed as a WHINSEC board of visitor member to ‘oversee’ democracy and human rights curriculum, as well as operations at the school.” Reich was also deeply involved in the planning of the coup against Chávez.
In 1999, Bolivian Captain Filiman Rodriguez had been found responsible for the kidnapping and torture of Waldo Albarracin, director of the Bolivian Popular Assembly of Human Rights. In 2002, Rodriguez was accepted for a 49-week officer training course at WHINSEC.
In May 2014, a detailed report by the Fellowship of Reconciliation and Colombia-Europe-U.S. Human Rights Observatory highlighted U.S. military assistance to Colombia between 2000 and 2010. According to the report, which studies extrajudicial killings committed by the Colombian Army Brigades, U.S. intelligence assistance to Colombia “supported units that had adopted a strategy conducive to extrajudicial killings.”
Colombia requires its officers to undergo training at WHINSEC. The 2014 report states that out of 25 Colombian graduates from 2001 to 2003, 12 had either been charged with “a serious crime or commanded units whose members had reportedly committed multiple extrajudicial killings.”
It should be remembered that Plan Colombia, signed by U.S. President Bill Clinton, was translated into “moral and political support” by Colombian Gen. Mario Montoya. Between 2000 and 2010, U.S. assistance was considered a factor which influenced the staggering total of 5,673 extrajudicial killings — all of which occurred with impunity, lack of judicial mechanisms, rewards for the murders and the role of national leaders such as Montoya providing a safety net for those complicit in the atrocities.
As regards WHINSEC in Colombia, an academic on the Board of Visitors is quoted in the report as stating, “So if a student of mine leaves an ethics class and engages in criminal activity does that make me or my university liable for her activity?”
This attitude summarizes the lack of accountability surrounding WHINSEC. The dissociation from the school’s history under its original name — the SOA — is merely a premise for distancing the institution from the atrocities committed by its students and graduates.
History, however, tells a different story. While WHINSEC continues to emphasize what it describes as a commitment to human rights by citing a mere eight hours of instruction in the subject, research, such as the report on Colombia’s extrajudicial killings, reveals a reality that goes beyond the cosmetic reforms employed by the institution.
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
#163
Still nothing about LIMA who wants to remove the Venezuela regime
 
petros
+1
#164
MegaHitlerz is upset the drug lords are staring down the wrong end of US funded barrels.
 
MHz
#165
Quote: Originally Posted by Twin_Moose View Post

Still nothing about LIMA who wants to remove the Venezuela regime

So what is holding you up. You have to do a buildup to a phantom post?
 
MHz
#166
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

MegaHitlerz is upset the drug lords are staring down the wrong end of US funded barrels.

You swallowed a lie along with whatever else that has left you with an addled mind. That could be an improvement over what it was before.
https://www.cia.gov/library/center-f...9-00/art7.html

CIA Air Operations in Laos, 1955-1974

Supporting the "Secret War"

https://www.washingtonpost.com/archi...=.af1f1a6c7965
Mention the CIA around Mena, Ark., and the response is likely to be an exasperated sigh and a pep talk about the local economy.
It's not that the 5,475 residents of this mountain village have anything against spying per se. But after a decade of being placed at the center of a purported CIA-backed gun, drug and money-laundering conspiracy, they'd like to forget the 1980s and get back to the important things. Like last month's Lum 'n' Abner festival honoring two hometown radio stars.
Conspiracies, says Mayor Jerry Montgomery, are bad for business, and the residents of Mena are weary of hearing their home talked about like the root of all evil. They've seen their town on "Geraldo." It has been featured on Pat Robertson's "700 Club." And now it finds itself at the center of a new book that's become something of an underground classic. If all the stories are true, it's as if the town were founded by the CIA, funded by BCCI and maintained for the amusement of investigators and journalists.
"It's absurd," Montgomery said of the publicity Mena has received over the last 10 years as an alleged center of covert operations. "It's all going on strictly because of politics."
Though he is not sure whose politics.
"First it was the Reagan administration. Then the Bush administration. And now we're into the Clinton administration. I don't know whether it's Democrats versus Republicans or Republicans versus Democrats. ... It is utterly absurd."
Most recently, alleged dark deeds at Mena have helped foster the cult of conspiracy that has taken root among some of Clinton's more virulent opponents. From ugly speculation about the "real story" behind White House aide Vincent Foster's death to menacing videotapes being marketed by the Rev. Jerry Falwell linking Clinton to a series of deaths in Arkansas, the result has been a steady undercurrent of gossip in talk show, televangelist and other circles about supposed Faustian deals Clinton cut on his way to the top.
Is the president a murderer? A dope fiend? A stooge of the CIA? Were his campaigns enriched by money funneled through some secret BCCI pipeline to Arkansas?
It's all out there, and more, and in most cases the goings-on at the Mena airport figure at least peripherally into the equation.


https://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/fe...715628181.html
Mexican official: CIA 'manages' drug trade

Spokesman for Chihuahua state says US agencies don't want to end drug trade, a claim denied by other Mexican officials.
Juarez, Mexico - The US Central Intelligence Agency and other international security forces "don't fight drug traffickers", a spokesman for the Chihuahua state government in northern Mexico has told Al Jazeera, instead "they try to manage the drug trade".
Allegations about official complicity in the drug business are nothing new when they come from activists, professors, campaigners or even former officials. However, an official spokesman for the authorities in one of Mexico's most violent states - one which directly borders Texas - going on the record with such accusations is unique.
"It's like pest control companies, they only control, " Guillermo Terrazas Villanueva, the Chihuahua spokesman, told Al Jazeera last month at his office in Juarez. "If you finish off the pests, you are out of a job. If they finish the drug business, they finish their jobs."


None of that is news to you, you version is there because you and the rest of the trolls are chronic liars, nothing more, nothing less.


You enjoy causing/seeing the suffering of others, you are a social reject at best.
https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Sadist
sadist

A sadist is a person who gain pleasure from seeing others undergo pain and discomfort.
A sadist is a person expressing callous, vicious, manipulative, and degrading behaviour towards other people.
#sadism #callous #humiliate #manipulate #vicious.
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
+1
#167
Quote: Originally Posted by MHz View Post

So what is holding you up. You have to do a buildup to a phantom post?

What phantom post? It has been placed in several posts, it's you trying to steer the conversation away from the topic like usual, with no clue with what is going on.
 
MHz
#168
Nope, I want your input about why Lima is so important that you bring it up without any specifics. If the SOA involvement in the whole area is not what you are referencing then what are you referencing. The replying to a question is a two-way street here rather that you question and I reply, . . . . . pal.
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
#169
I have several times you keep missing it with your it's the Jooos agenda
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
#170
You can start here MHz

http://forums.canadiancontent.net/sh...t=59637&page=2

Post #41
 
MHz
#171
Brazil's far-right presidential candidate survives life-saving surgery after being stabbed by 'socialist' attacker who said he was acting on 'a mission from God' during rally

  • The far right-wing candidate was attacked in Juiz de Fora, in Minas Gerais state
  • He was knifed in the stomach while being carried shoulder high in a crowd
  • The 63-year-old had surgery and is stable and out of 'acute, immediate danger'
  • Suspect Adélio Bispo de Oliveira, 40, said he was acting on 'mission from God'
#41
What does Lima, Peru have to page 6? Peru isn't even mentioned. Be happy to look into the assassination attempt. Start with acting like a rock star instead of a friend to the country in the area that is the most hated in the area. The latest I read about Brazil was they announced they were moving their embassy to Jerusalem or some similar headline that showed they were an Israeli Allie. The 'spin' is the attacker having close ties to the rebel leaders in the country most hated by Israel and the US. Should Boomer answer how long it would take to set that up??
How is the trial going??
Oliveira was said to be a member of the left-leaning PSOL party from 2007 to 2014. On his Facebook page, the attacker recently posted messages criticizing Bolsonaro and supporting the socialist government of President Nicolas Maduro in Venezuela.
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
+1
#172
And if you went to #42 you would have seen

Quote:

Canada at odds with Latin American allies over intervention in Venezuela
Canada broke ranks this week with the majority of a group of American nations it helped to create to deal with the spiraling crisis in Venezuela.
And although Canada's refusal to sign a joint statement of the Lima Group — a statement that commits members to opposing military intervention in Venezuela — does not portend a sudden shift in Canadian policy, it is part of the first significant split among the group's 14 members over how far they might go to restore democratic government to the impoverished nation.

It has nothing to do with the US or Russia
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
+1
#173
Have you figured out LIMA yet?
 
MHz
#174
Seriously, you cannot even get the correct post # .
Take them to court, by the time 'they' finish asking Canada about the living conditions of the Indians when Canada is under zero sanctions it will JT's balls that are going to the crusher.
 
petros
+1
#175
Them who?
 
MHz
#176
The Court Canada is going to take them to, over human rights abuses. (apparently, headlines are used as actual facts around here)

The same one mentioned a few words before 'they'.
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
#177
Quote: Originally Posted by MHz View Post

Seriously, you cannot even get the correct post # .
Take them to court, by the time 'they' finish asking Canada about the living conditions of the Indians when Canada is under zero sanctions it will JT's balls that are going to the crusher.

I wrote starting from #41 carry on through the next page or so to see them all, comprehension is not one of your strong suits is it?
 
petros
+1
#178
The Court in Peru?
 
Twin_Moose
Conservative
+1
#179
Yeah he has no clue
 
MHz
#180
Quote: Originally Posted by Twin_Moose View Post

Yeah he has no clue

How can Canada take a Government to any Court when they don't recognize them as being the Government. Everybody get a 'special bag of happy powder'? Should I highlight the lies first or wait till you do your troll routine. (notice how I decided how it will go)

https://canadiandimension.com/articl...criminal-court
Canada brings Venezuela to International Criminal Court

Yves Engler Canadian Politics, Latin America and the Caribbean October 21, 2018

Requesting the International Criminal Court to investigate Venezuela’s government is a significant escalation in Ottawa’s campaign of interference in the domestic affairs of another country.
Supported by five like-minded South American nations, it’s the first time a member state has been brought before the ICC’s chief prosecutor by other members.
In Canada the campaign to have the ICC investigate the Nicolás Maduro government began in May. “I would like to see the states from the G7 agreeing to refer the matter of crimes against humanity to the International Criminal Court for a prospective investigation and prosecution,” said Irwin Cotler at an Ottawa press conference to release a report on purported Venezuelan human rights violations. The former Liberal justice minister added, “this is the arch-typical example of why a reference is needed, as to why the ICC was created.”
Cotler was one of three “international experts” responsible for a 400-page Canadian-backed Organization of American States (OAS) report on rights violations in Venezuela. The panel recommended OAS secretary general Luis Almagro submit the report to the Office of the Prosecutor of the ICC and that other states refer Venezuela to the ICC. In a Real News Network interview Max Blumenthal described “the hyperbolic and propagandistic nature” of the press conference where the report was released at the OAS in Washington. Cotler said Venezuela’s “government itself was responsible for the worst ever humanitarian crisis in the region.”
Worse than the extermination of the Taíno and Arawak by the Spanish? Or the enslavement of five million Africans in Brazil? Or the 200,000 Mayans killed in Guatemala? Or the thousands of state-murdered “subversives” in Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, Brazil, Peru, etc.? Worse than the tens of thousands killed in Colombia, Honduras and Mexico in recent years? Worse than the countless US (and Canadian) backed military coups in the region?
Or perhaps Almagro, who appointed Cotler and the two other panelists, approves of the use of military might to enforce the will of the rich and powerful. He stated last month: “As for military intervention to overthrow the Nicolas Maduro regime, I think we should not rule out any option … diplomacy remains the first option but we can’t exclude any action.” Even before he mused about a foreign invasion, the former Uruguayan foreign minister’s campaign against Maduro prompted Almagro’s past boss, former president José Mujica, to condemn his bias against the Venezuelan government.
For his part, Cotler has been attacking Venezuela’s Bolivarian government for a decade. In a 2015 Miami Herald op-ed Cotler wrote that “sanctions” and “travel-visa bans … isn’t enough.” The US government “must increase the pressure on Maduro to respect the fundamental human rights of all Venezuela’s people.” The next year Venezuela’s obstructionist, opposition-controlled National Assembly gave Cotler an award for his efforts, notably as a lawyer for right-wing coup leader Leopoldo Lopez. When he joined Lopez’ legal team in early 2015 the Venezuelan and international media described Cotler as Nelson Mandela’s former lawyer (a Reuters headline noted, “Former Mandela lawyer to join defense of Venezuela’s jailed activist”). In response, South Africa’s Ambassador to Venezuela, Pandit Thaninga Shope-Linney, said, “Irwin Cotler was not Nelson Mandela’s lawyer and does not represent the Government or the people of South Africa in any manner.”


https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/can...uela-1.4966487
Canada, Latin American countries won't recognize Maduro's new government
13 countries urge Venezuelan president to hand over power until fairer elections are held

The Associated Press · Posted: Jan 04, 2019 3:07 PM ET | Last Updated: January 4


A group of 13 countries, including Canada, pledged Friday not to recognize Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro's new term, which he won in elections widely condemned as illegitimate. (Marco Bello/Reuters)Canada and a dozen Latin American governments delivered a blistering rebuke to Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro on Friday, questioning the legitimacy of his soon-to-begin second term and urging him to hand over power as the only path to restoring democracy in his crisis-wracked South American country.
The sharp criticism came at a meeting in Peru's capital of foreign ministers from countries including Argentina, Brazil and Colombia, all of which have been weighing how to confront the increasingly authoritarian Maduro while absorbing a growing exodus of Venezuelans fleeing economic chaos.
In a statement, the Lima Group urged Maduro to refrain from taking the presidential oath next Thursday and instead cede power to the opposition-controlled congress until new, fairer elections can be held.
"Only through the full restoration, as soon as possible, of democracy and a respect for human rights is it possible to resolve the country's political, economic, social and humanitarian crisis," the diplomats said.
Venezuela says countries following Trump's orders

Even before announcing the resolution, the group's meeting with the participation of U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo drew a sharp response from Venezuelan Foreign Minister Jorge Arreaza.
He accused the coalition of taking orders directly from U.S. President Donald Trump, who Caracas frequently accuses of spearheading an economic war against the country.
"What a display of humiliating subordination!" Arreaza said on Twitter.

A once-wealthy oil nation, Venezuela is in crisis after two decades of socialist rule, marked by hyperinflation making it difficult for people to afford scarce food and medicine. An estimated 2.3 million Venezuelans have migrated from their country since 2015, according to the United Nations.
The Lima Group formed more than a year ago to advocate for a solution to Venezuela's crisis that threatens regional instability. Canada, Argentina, Brazil and Mexico are among the group's members. The group joined the U.S. and others in condemning Maduro's re-election in May as a sham after popular opponents were banned from running and the largest anti-government parties boycotted the race.

Immediately following Maduro's May 20 re-election, the coalition announced that it refused to recognize the results, decrying the vote as failing to meet "international standards of a democratic, free, just and transparent process."
On Friday, the group vowed to block top Venezuelan officials from entering their countries and freeze assets they hold abroad. The resolution also expressed support for an effort to prosecute Maduro at the International Criminal Court for crimes against humanity.
But beyond the heated rhetoric, the anti-Maduro coalition showed signs of fraying along ideological lines.

Canadian Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland addresses reporters during a meeting of the Lima Group in Mexico City last May. The group formed last year to advocate for a solution to Venezuela's deepening political and economic crisis, which threatens regional instability. (Edgard Garrido/Reuters)
Regional powerbroker Mexico was one of the early and biggest promoters of the Lima Group. But it sent a lower-level representative to Friday's meeting who refused to sign the resolution, reflecting the policy of non-intervention favoured by that nation's new leftist president, Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador.
Maduro travelled to Mexico for Lopez Obrador's inauguration and met privately with the leftist leader during the visit.
 

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