Skull of the oldest Dutchwoman is found in the North Sea


Blackleaf
#1
Part of a prehistoric human skull found beneath the North Sea has been dubbed the 'oldest ever Dutchwoman'.

Alongside a carved bison bone found at a nearby site, the skull fragment is around 13,000 years old, archaeologists found.

The finds form the oldest known modern human from the Netherlands and the earliest artwork ever recovered from the North Sea.

The discoveries highlight a sunken treasure trove of human archaeology beneath the body of water that was once a land bridge between Britain and northern Europe, researchers said.

Skull of the 'oldest Dutchwoman' and a 13,500-year-old carved bison bone are found in an area of the North Sea that once formed a land bridge between Britain and Northern Europe


Dutch fishermen found the bones on separate occasions around Dogger Bank

The shallow area of the North Sea sits 62 miles off the east coast of England

It formed a land bridge between continental Europe and the UK 9,000 years ago

Partial skull bone forms the oldest known modern human from the Netherlands

Carvings in the bison bone are earliest artwork ever found in the North Sea


By Harry Pettit For Mailonline
28 February 2018

Part of a prehistoric human skull found beneath the North Sea has been dubbed the 'oldest ever Dutchwoman'.

Alongside a carved bison bone found at a nearby site, the skull fragment is around 13,000 years old, archaeologists found.

The finds form the oldest known modern human from the Netherlands and the earliest artwork ever recovered from the North Sea.

The discoveries highlight a sunken treasure trove of human archaeology beneath the body of water that was once a land bridge between Britain and northern Europe, researchers said.


Part of a prehistoric human skull found beneath the North Sea has been dubbed the 'oldest ever Dutchwoman'

Dutch fishermen found the partial skull and bison bone on separate occasions in recent years around Dogger Bank, a large sandbank in a shallow area of the North Sea about 62 miles off the east coast of England.

The bank was not always underwater, forming a land bridge that linked continental Europe and the British Isles until around 9,000 years ago.

Scientists believe the partial skull once belonged to a young or middle-age adult woman who died when she was between 22 and 45 years old.

The prehistoric hunter-gatherer lived on the North Sea landmass when it stood around 260 feet above sea level - a region scientists call Doggerland.

'These hunter-gatherers must have roamed these plains and perhaps one season they visited what is now the UK and the next season stayed in what are now the Netherlands,' study coauthor archaeologist Dr Marcel Niekus told Live Science.

'This now-submerged landscape is of crucial importance to our understanding of our past. It is, so to speak, a treasure chest of archaeological finds.'


Alongside a carved bison bone found at a nearby site, the skull fragment is over 13,000 years old, archaeologists found


Pictured is the carved decoration on the bison bone. The finds form the oldest known modern human from the Netherlands and the earliest artwork ever recovered from the North Sea

Chemical analysis of the skull suggests that meat from hunted animals made up a significant portion of the woman's daily diet.

Human hunter-gatherers at the time were early 'pioneers' of pine forests that spread across Doggerland before it was submerged, said study lead author Dr Luc Amkreutz and archaeologist at the Netherlands' National Museum of Antiquities.

As species like the woolly mammoth became extinct in the warming regions, animals like elk and bison moved into the emerging forests, followed by human hunters.

'It was a time of change, and these were the first new people that came with that change, true hunters of the forest,' Dr Amkreutz told Live Science.

'As the forests expanded farther north and west, so did our ancestors.'


Scientists believe the partial skull once belonged to a young or middle-age adult woman who died when she was between 22 and 45 years old


The prehistoric hunter-gatherer lived on the North Sea landmass when it stood around 260 feet above sea level - a region scientists call Doggerland


Chemical analysis of the skull suggests that meat from hunted animals made up a significant portion of the woman's daily diet

The bison bone fragment was found in 2013, several years after the partial skull, which was captured in fishing nets in 2005.

The new radiocarbon tests show it is slightly older than the skull, at around 13,500 years old.

The artefact is a fragment of a metatarsal with a striking zig-zag decoration, though its function remains unknown.


The bison artefact is a fragment of a metatarsal with a striking zig-zag decoration, though its function remains unknown



The bison bone was possibly used as the handle of a tool, or as a ritual object, according to the researchers. Pictured is a scan of its decorative carvings


Pictured is a scan of the bison bone carvings. It has been suggested that the repetitive motifs have to do with streaming water, but another explanation is that these zigzag patterns occur in [hallucinations] when shamans are in a trance, researchers said

It was possibly used as the handle of a tool, or as a ritual object, scientists said.

'It has been suggested that the repetitive motifs have to do with streaming water, but another explanation, which we intend to explore further, is the fact that these zigzag patterns occur in [hallucinations] when shamans are in a trance,' Dr Niekus said.

'So, perhaps shamanism became more important during the Federmesser culture.'

Similar bone decorations have been found in Poland, France and the UK, suggesting these groups had wide-ranging contact with other tribes.


Dutch fishermen found the partial skull and bison bone at separate locations around Dogger Bank, a large sandbank in a shallow area of the North Sea about 62 miles off the east coast of England

Read more: 13,000-year-old skull of oldest Dutchwoman found | Daily Mail Online
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Last edited by Blackleaf; Mar 4th, 2018 at 06:43 AM..
 
Curious Cdn
#2
Betcha she was coloured.
 
Blackleaf
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

Betcha she was coloured.

Well she would have been coloured. She might have been coloured white.
 
Curious Cdn
#4
... or not ...
 
Blackleaf
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

... or not ...

Not that it matters what colour she was, of course. It has no bearing on today. Only the lefty liberals are bothered what skin colours people of thousands of years ago had. Nobody else is.
 
justlooking
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

Betcha she was coloured.

Indeed, and what was she doing walking on water so far from land ?
Must a be a Jesus freak too.
 
Curious Cdn
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

Not that it matters what colour she was, of course. It has no bearing on today. Only the lefty liberals are bothered what skin colours people of thousands of years ago had. Nobody else is.

Your black forbearers would agree with you, I'm sure.
 
Blackleaf
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

Your black forbearers would agree with you, I'm sure.

I'm sure they would (although we may have to go back hundreds of thousands of years to get to my black forebears).
 
Curious Cdn
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

I'm sure they would (although we may have to go back hundreds of thousands of years to get to my black forebears).

...or not ...
 
Blackleaf
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

...or not ...

Still much further than my nearest white ancestors - my parents.

My dad has traced our family tree back to around 200 years ago and none of them are as black as Newgate's knocker. They're all white, as to be expected.
 
Curious Cdn
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf View Post

Still much further than my neatest white ancestors - my parents.

My dad has traced our family tree back to around 200 years ago and none of them are as black as Newgate's knocker. They're all white, as to be expected.

Only 200 years? That's not very far.

Is that when he hit the "Son of a whore" entry in the Parish register?
 
Blackleaf
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

Only 200 years? That's not very far.

It's far enough at the moment.
 

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