Canadian Oil


petros
+3
#1
Should we just use bitumen for domestic use and current obligated exports and only export our sweet crude, upgraded heavy crude and kerogen?

Yes? No? Why?

Ontario is paying for Trump's tax cuts.

In 2016, Ontario imports were all from the U.S. and more than tripled to reach 85 Mb/d. Newfoundland and Labrador imports increased only 1% to 90 Mb/d, but went from being nearly all from the U.S. in 2015 to roughly half being supplied from the U.S. in 2016. New Brunswick imports fell 6% to 218 Mb/d, including a 61% decrease in U.S. imports. Quebec imports fell 25% to 214 Mb/d, led by a 43% drop in U.S. imports.

No point in building Energy East now that it's piped from the US.
 
Danbones
#2
Why don't we have any new refineries in Canada?
 
captain morgan
+3
#3
... The irony is that much of that supply originates in Canada.

Clearly the extra more gooder smrt folks in Eastern Canada are interested in paying WTI rather than taking Cdn resources and negotiating a discount.
 
petros
+5
#4  Top Rated Post
BC is buying tanker imported oil from the US and paying for Trump's Tax Cuts

Western Canadian crude oil imports, which are all from the U.S., increased 33% to 152 Mb/d in 2016.

Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

... The irony is that much of that supply originates in Canada.

Clearly the extra more gooder smrt folks in Eastern Canada are interested in paying WTI rather than taking Cdn resources and negotiating a discount.

Kissing a big chunk of trade deficit good bye is a tough thing for Canadians to swallow. They enjoying paying 22% more for goods on Amazon. Just ask flossy.

Quote: Originally Posted by Danbones View Post

Why don't we have any new refineries in Canada?

We do. Major capacity expansions happened over the Harper years and a shiny new one in SK is breaking ground in a few months.
 
Danbones
+2
#5
Well, I didn't know about that one, but I think we should have more.
Value added and cost reduction and all that.

The US will be the world's largest exporter by 2020 according to plan, so I wonder where that will leave us?

Analysts Raise Oil Price Forecasts
https://oilprice.com/Energy/Energy-G...Forecasts.html

That and higher interest rates could "third world" the whole country.
Not to mention the carbon tax.
Last edited by Danbones; Feb 22nd, 2018 at 11:40 AM..
 
Curious Cdn
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

... The irony is that much of that supply originates in Canada.

Clearly the extra more gooder smrt folks in Eastern Canada are interested in paying WTI rather than taking Cdn resources and negotiating a discount.

Around here, it costs a lot less to bring it here by tanker(at least as far as the lower St.Lawrence, anyway) from the Gulf of Mexico than to pump it over the middle of the Continent. That is a reason but perhaps not a good enough reason, anymore.
 
Cliffy
+1
#7
How about Alberta refines the bitumen in Alberta and ships the finished product. If they can afford this multi-billion dollar pipeline, they can afford to build a refinery.
 
Twin_Moose
+2
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

How about Alberta refines the bitumen in Alberta and ships the finished product. If they can afford this multi-billion dollar pipeline, they can afford to build a refinery.

They already do, but it is restricted to contracts of refined goods

Just to add the Prairie refined goods can't go to Ontario because refined fuels cannot cross the U.S. border the pipeline that handles refined goods would have to cross using the Southern route no Northern route due to the Energy East shutdown.
 
petros
+2
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by Danbones View Post

Well, I didn't know about that one, but I think we should have more.
Value added and cost reduction and all that.

The US will be the world's largest exporter by 2020 according to plan, so I wonder where that will leave us?

Analysts Raise Oil Price Forecasts
https://oilprice.com/Energy/Energy-G...Forecasts.html

That and higher interest rates could "third world" the whole country.
Not to mention the carbon tax.

US going energy independent is an extra 2% of growth which currently sits at 2.2%.

Canadians don't want to be energy independent.

Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

How about Alberta refines the bitumen in Alberta and ships the finished product. If they can afford this multi-billion dollar pipeline, they can afford to build a refinery.

They already do.

Shipping a boatload of gasoline? Greeeeeeat idea.

Quote: Originally Posted by Twin_Moose View Post

They already do, but it is restricted to contracts of refined goods

Just to add the Prairie refined goods can't go to Ontario because refined fuels cannot cross the U.S. border the pipeline that handles refined goods would have to cross using the Southern route no Northern route due to the Energy East shutdown.

No energy east mean ON is 100% reliant on Trump.

Wynne and Trudy sold their Souls to Trump.
 
Curious Cdn
+1
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

US going energy independent is an extra 2% of growth which currently sits at 2.2%.

Canadians don't want to be energy independent.



They already do.

Shipping a boatload of gasoline? Greeeeeeat idea.



No energy east mean ON is 100% reliant on Trump.

Wynne and Trudy sold their Souls to Trump.

It happened decades before either of them came along. We're still being supplied by the WWII convoy route from the Gulf of Mexico. It is that old or even older and it hasn't missed a day since the first half of the 20th century. If you want to blame anyone, try the oil execs in Dallas ( maybe even a few in Cowgary) who wish to maximize their returns.
 
petros
+1
#11
Uh uh. Shale oil by pipe.
 
Curious Cdn
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Uh uh. Shale oil by pipe.

There is no pipe from Sask, yet. You blame Ontario for that, do you?
 
petros
+3
#13
Now back to OPEC
OPEC oil comes roaring back into Canada: Cartel supplies a third of imports, displacing U.S. shale | Financial Post

Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

There is no pipe from Sask, yet. You blame Ontario for that, do you?

Why not? Its a choice. You can support Canada or keep supporting America and Arabs.

Are you Canadian or not?
 
Curious Cdn
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Now back to OPEC
OPEC oil comes roaring back into Canada: Cartel supplies a third of imports, displacing U.S. shale | Financial Post



Why not? Its a choice. You can support Canada or keep supporting America and Arabs.

Are you Canadian or not?

Oh, I've believed for a very long time that we should get our petroleum from the West. We get our NG from there, now (although the "Let the Eastern Bastards Freeze in the Dark" part made us wonder if it was a mistake to do so, after all).

What did you say about supporting your fellow Canadians, again?
 
Cliffy
#15
On Energy & First Nations, politicians want to have their cake and eat it too




All sunshine and broken promises

Justin Trudeau after election victory (John Tavares/Flickr CC)

If the first step in dealing with a problem is admitting you have one, then Canada has made some progress on the environment and Indigenous rights – but on that score alone.
We traded climate change-denying, First Nations-bashing Prime Minister Stephen Harper for the smooth-talking, Sunny Ways Justin Trudeau. He made bold declarations about fighting climate change on the campaign trail, then in Paris, earning him accolades from around the world. He installed Canada’s first ever Aboriginal Justice Minister, Jody Wilson-Raybould, promised a “new relationship” with First Nations, and vowed to adopt the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People (UNDRIP).
But many of his actions have not lived up to the words. The hypocrisy is on full display for everyone to behold. For instance, he recently told The National Observer thattripling Kinder Morgan’s dilbit pipeline capacity “is an unavoidable element in a national climate plan.” Huh?
Trudeau explained his twisted logic to CBC radio’s Gregor Craigie:
First of all, we need to have a world-class oceans protection plan in place, which is why we put over $1 billion in the biggest investment in protecting the B.C. coast that there’s ever been.

Let’s pause there a moment. Wouldn’t not adding 340 new oil tankers a year to the BC coast be an even better way to protect it? Justin continued:
Second, we have to have an ambitious plan to fight carbon emissions, to reduce carbon emissions, right across the country, which we’ve brought in with the pan-Canadian framework…And third, we need to make sure that we are getting our resources to market overseas, safely and securely.The only way we can get any of those things is if we do all three of those things together. That’s the plan that we put in place, and that’s what we’re going to move forward with.


On Energy & First Nations, politicians want to have their cake and eat it too -The Common Sense CanadianThe Common Sense Canadian
 
captain morgan
+1
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

Around here, it costs a lot less to bring it here by tanker(at least as far as the lower St.Lawrence, anyway) from the Gulf of Mexico than to pump it over the middle of the Continent. That is a reason but perhaps not a good enough reason, anymore.

A lot of US feedstock supplying Eastern Canada originates in Western Canada.

on that note, relying on tanker transport is significantly more expensive in the medium and long term than a pipeline.

Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

How about Alberta refines the bitumen in Alberta and ships the finished product. If they can afford this multi-billion dollar pipeline, they can afford to build a refinery.

I'd mention that you're as smart as a bag of hammers, but I'd be insulting bags of hammers, and that isn't fair
 
petros
+1
#17
Quote:

Let’s pause there a moment. Wouldn’t not adding 340 new oil tankers a year to the BC coast be an even better way to protect it?

How many ships leave full of BC trees, toilet paper and coal everyday?
 
captain morgan
+1
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

Let’s pause there a moment. Wouldn’t not adding 340 new oil tankers a year to the BC coast be an even better way to protect it?

Getting rid of the 10s of thousands of pleasure craft and dozens of ferries would be a great start
 
petros
+2
#19
Tourism is bad for the environment.

Horrific really.
 
captain morgan
+2
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Tourism is bad for the environment.



So are wineries

hehehehehe

Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

Horrific really.

It pains me that BC refuses to think of the children
 
OpposingDigit
#21
71% of Tar Sands Production Owned by Foreign Interests
May 10, 2012



How much of Canada’s energy resource lies in foreign hands?
As Ottawa mulls the fate of two major energy deals – and the implications of foreign ownership in an economy heavily dependant on natural resources – we take a snapshot of who actually owns what in the oil and gas industry.
December 03, 2012
Oil and natural gas in Canada



How much of Canada’s energy resource lies in foreign hands?
As Ottawa mulls the fate of two major energy deals – and the implications of foreign ownership in an economy heavily dependant on natural resources – we take a snapshot of who actually owns what in the oil and gas industry.
December 03, 2012
Oil and natural gas in Canada
 
captain morgan
+2
#22
That article is from 6 years ago.

It's changed dramatically
 
OpposingDigit
#23
Who Owns Canadian Banks?


The Canadian banks of the Royal Canadian Bank, Bank of Nova Scotia and the Toronto Dominion Bank have an incestuous cross ownership and each having Barclays Global Investors Holdings Ltd as a major shareholder as well.

Barclays Global Investors Holdings Ltd
It is the 6th largest shareholder in Royal Bank of Canada and Bank of Nova Scotia.
It is the 9th largest shareholder in Toronto Dominion Bank.


Hi! Captain Morgan:


So, tell me ..... what has changed since 2012?
 
captain morgan
+2
#24
Lots.

Most recently, a number of US firms sold their oil sands assets... Among the big buyers was Canadian Natural Resources, a Canadian company.

I also understand that some European based resource groups have done likewise
 
Durry
+2
#25
What difference does it make if its foreign owned??

What do you think these foreigners own when you say its foreign owned? ANS, they only own the steel and the right to do business according to Canada's rules/laws.
Being foreign owned means little.
 
captain morgan
+1
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by Durry View Post

What difference does it make if its foreign owned??
Being foreign owned means little.

You're dead right.

A bevy of Provincial and Fed taxes are paid in addition to royalties and employment.

Doesn't really matter who owns them
 
Cliffy
#27
 
captain morgan
+4
#28
Whales love swimming in, and respiring raw BC sewage.

It's really good for them
 
Durry
#29
Quote: Originally Posted by OpposingDigit View Post

Who Owns Canadian Banks?


The Canadian banks of the Royal Canadian Bank, Bank of Nova Scotia and the Toronto Dominion Bank have an incestuous cross ownership and each having Barclays Global Investors Holdings Ltd as a major shareholder as well.

Barclays Global Investors Holdings Ltd
It is the 6th largest shareholder in Royal Bank of Canada and Bank of Nova Scotia.
It is the 9th largest shareholder in Toronto Dominion Bank.
[?

You babble a lot, but you say little and make a bunch of meaningless statements.
 
Curious Cdn
#30
Quote: Originally Posted by Danbones View Post

Why don't we have any new refineries in Canada?

Dere's always Come-by-Chance, Bye!