Turkey rolls back secular education


tay
#1
Pastor Ahmet Guvener managed to get his daughter, a Christian, an exemption from mandatory religious classes in her Turkish school. But he soon found that the 17-year-old wasn't really off the hook.





As an alternative to the classes at her school in Diyarbakir, in southeast Turkey, she would have to choose from three electives: the life of the Prophet Muhammad, the Quran or basic religious knowledge — or fail the year.


"It seriously damaged my child's psychology," said Guvener, who heads the Protestant Church in Diyarbakir. He accuses the school of deliberately forcing religious education on students — a claim the teachers' union denied.


Turkey has long enshrined the secular ideals of founding father Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, particularly in an education system that until recently banned Islamic headscarves in schools and made schoolchildren begin the day reciting an oath of allegiance to Ataturk's legacy. Now proponents of Turkey's secular traditions claim President Recep Tayyip Erdogan is taking a new path, building a more Islam-focused education system to realize his stated goal of raising "pious generations."


The ruling Islamic-rooted Justice and Development Party insists it is simply heeding the demands of a conservative and pious majority. It says the education measures aim to undo restrictions on religious education that were imposed following Turkey's so-called "soft military coup" of 1997, when the then-powerful military — which saw itself as the guardian of Ataturk's secular principles — pressured an Islamic-led government out of power and moved to close down vocational religious middle schools.


"Education is an ideological tool," said Sakine Esen Yilmaz, secretary-general of the left-leaning Education and Science Laborer's Union. "It is (now) being used to raise an obedient generation that will serve the government."




Last week, thousands of people demonstrated in Istanbul to demand that the secular principles of education be upheld. They urged the government to halt a perceived campaign to impose the Sunni faith and to respect the rights of students from the Alevi Shiite sect that constitutes Turkey's largest religious minority.


Education expert Abbas Guclu, who writes for Milliyet newspaper, argues that increasing religious education may not necessarily lead to a more pious generation.


"It is not possible to control the youth of today," Guclu said. "If they spend three or five hours at school, they spend eight or 10 hours in front of the Internet, the social media or television. For every few hours of religious education they spend hundreds of hours elsewhere, being bombarded by other things."




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Turkey rolls back secular education for 'pious generation'
 
CDNBear
#2
Oh oh!

I wonder if we'll keep seeing Cannuck and Flossy foist Turkey as the Vanguard of Islamic moderation, lol.
 
Cliffy
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by CDNBear View Post

Oh oh!

I wonder if we'll keep seeing Cannuck and Flossy foist Turkey as the Vanguard of Islamic moderation, lol.

Not sure if you remember Selin from Turkey. I am still in contact with her. She is a teacher there and a political activist (which to some degree explains why she doesn't come here anymore). Anyway, she says their President is a fundamentalist Muslim and is trying hard to reverse the secular nature of their country but is running up against a lot of resistance. I doubt this schmuck will succeed in the end with people like Selin around.
 
CDNBear
+1
#4  Top Rated Post
Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

Not sure if you remember Selin from Turkey. I am still in contact with her. She is a teacher there and a political activist (which to some degree explains why she doesn't come here anymore). Anyway, she says their President is a fundamentalist Muslim and is trying hard to reverse the secular nature of their country but is running up against a lot of resistance. I doubt this schmuck will succeed in the end with people like Selin around.

That's why people like Selin get killed.

Besides, she wasn't that far from a fundamentalist herself.
 
Ludlow
#5
What kind of people name their country after a stinkin bird anyhoo.
 
Nuggler
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by Ludlow View Post

What kind of people name their country after a stinkin bird anyhoo.

gobblers
 
Cliffy
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by CDNBear View Post

That's why people like Selin get killed.

Besides, she wasn't that far from a fundamentalist herself.

Does this look like a fundamentalist Muslim to you?

 
BaalsTears
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

Does this look like a fundamentalist Muslim to you?

She looks like a turkey on Thanksgiving.

If she's living in a Muslim country, but is an Apostate, I wonder what the future holds in store for her.
 
Cliffy
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by BaalsTears View Post

She looks like a turkey on Thanksgiving.

If she's living in a Muslim country, but is an Apostate, I wonder what the future holds in store for her.

Turkey is still a secular country... for now. They have been since the 1920s. That is not going to be easy to transition. There will be rebellion.
 
JLM
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by Ludlow View Post

What kind of people name their country after a stinkin bird anyhoo.

Nah, it was probably named after the people who lived there...................the Turks!
 
damngrumpy
#11
There will be a Turkey spring before its over in the meantime we have religion
making trouble again. When will people finally understand we won't ever all
believe the same thing. Let people live their lives in peace and believe what
ever the hell they want When we get that right this crap will end. It is not just
Muslims Christians try the same thing babbling nonsense about this being a
Christian Nation which it is not. Founding Fathers in America and Canada
adopted the concept of separation of church and state in other words mind
your own damn business as long as you are not trampling on others leave it
alone