Electric Vehicles Could be Worth $3.6 Billion to the Ontario Economy


mentalfloss
-1
#1
Electric Vehicles Could be Worth $3.6 Billion to the Ontario Economy

The latest report from the Windfall Centre argues Ontario’s economy could benefit from the production of electric vehicles (EVs) to the tune of $3.6 billion by 2025.

The Windfall Centre, a non-profit, sustainability advocacy group, argues in Getting to 80: Meeting Ontario’s Emissions Targets that if electric vehicles can reach a 10 per cent share of total passenger vehicles by 2025, the province can expect total income from the auto sector to jump substantially. Over 34,000 person-years of work will be created in the process, they write.

Ontario’s Go Green Action Plan on Climate Change commits the province to reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 6 per cent by 2014, 15 per cent by 2020 and 80 per cent below 1990 levels by 2050. The province’s environmental watchdog, Gord Miller, has previously stated Ontario is on track to meet its 2014 targets but warns that meeting the 2020 targets is no sure thing.

Reducing the number of fossil-fuel burning cars on the road is only a small part of this strategy, but it can do more, the report argues. Electric vehicles can do much to help lower GHGs from the transportation sector, the single largest GHG-emitting sector in the province.

The Liberals’ goal to have 5 per cent of new vehicles on the road be EVs by 2020 is simply too “ambiguous,” writes Windfall executive director Brent Kopperson. And the automotive sector can do more to help drive this change, he feels.

“Considering Ontario is home to 10 automotive assembly plants and 300+ independent parts manufacturers that employ over 90,000 people, transitioning from manufacturing traditional vehicles to electric vehicles is expected to create more opportunities across various occupations,” Kopperson writes in the report.

The shift from traditional vehicles to EVs will also have the additional consequence of creating “disruptive change throughout business supply chains, the oil and gas industry, energy production and storage and the electrical infrastructure sector.”

Implementing such a sea change in how cars are made and purchased in Ontario wouldn’t be easy, especially not at first, Kopperson notes. In the beginning there would be economic losses, some of them substantial. They break down as follows:

Reduction in gasoline use would cause $206 million in losses by 2025;

Job losses in the oil and gas sector could reach 1,243;

All levels of government would lose approximately $57 million in revenue and personal income tax loss of close to $14 million;
$52 million would be lost by Ottawa on the fuel tax and $29 million lost by Ontario; and
$8.3 million would be lost in HST by the federal government and an additional $15.5 million lost by the province.

These losses are nothing to sneeze at. But the economic and environmental benefits would more than make up for any disruptions in traditional transportation methods and financial setbacks to either Ottawa or Queen’s Park, the report argues.

Economic benefits of a 10 per cent switch to EVs by 2025 include a sizable bump to federal, provincial and municipal coffers, they argue.

Additional tax revenue for all three levels of government would reach $1.08 billion with $526 million to Ottawa, $424 million to Ontario and $140 spread out over the province’s 444 municipalities.

“It is imperative that Ontario proactively engages to make Ontario an important hub of EV manufacturing not just for Canada but for all of North America,” Kopperson concludes. “Failure to do so would result not just in missed economic opportunities but also in economic losses.”

If Ontario fails to take advantage of its traditional automotive sector and help nudge it in a more sustainable direction it will likely find itself playing catch-up to more progressive jurisdictions soon enough, they note.

“It would likely never recover from these missed economic opportunities.”

Electric Vehicles Could be Worth $3.6 Billion to the Ontario Economy | A\J –Â*Canada's Environmental Voice
 
JamesBondo
+3
#2  Top Rated Post
If I buy a cheap econo car (used) for about the same cost as the battery pack in an electric vehicle, I believe my car will outlive their battery pack. We need sensible solutions. As soon as they are available, I'm in.

I'd much rather have an electric car instead of a muscle car. However, I'm like most people, ie I don't own a muscle car. I own a practical car. So when it comes to purchasing an electric vehicle, it has to be affordable not just some idealistic bullcrap that I am supposed to do the right thing for the earth.
 
CDNBear
+3
#3
I'd also like to know how the increased hydro load will be dealt with.
 
SLM
No Party Affiliation
+2
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by CDNBear View Post

I'd also like to know how the increased hydro load will be dealt with.

Funny you should mention that, as I was just reading this article.

Ontario’s 75 utilities may short-circuit rise of electric cars: experts

It's a few months old but certainly relevant in the context of your statement.
 
Walter
+1
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalfloss View Post

Electric Vehicles Could be Worth $3.6 Billion to the Ontario Economy | A\J –Â*Canada's Environmental Voice

A large stinking pile of BS.
 
SLM
No Party Affiliation
+1
#6
Saying Electric Vehicles could be worth 3.6 billion to the economy immediately makes me wonder how much it cost us to get there. Real figures though, not those green project think tank figures. Because I suspect it will be a little like those people who buy scratch tickets every day at $3-$5 a pop and after a few weeks claim they are a winner because they got $20 out of the deal. Lol.
 
gopher
No Party Affiliation
+2
#7
Over the years I have read conflicting reports about the merits of electric cars as opposed to light rail. That many believe society should emphasize creation of light rail for suburban and inner city commuters. It is said that such investments promote greater access to jobs and shopping thereby generating more social productivity and tax revenues. Individual electric cars are said to be economically unfeasible as electric charges can give only a very limited transportation range. That, by contrast, light rail and trackless trolleys have limitless range, cost far less to operate, use far less electricity, and raise social productivity. On that basis, society should invest more in this alternative.

Therefore, while producers may continue to explore the idea of creating more efficient electric autos, the better way for society to direct itself is in creating more light rail as its cost to society is far less while generating more business and social activity. For the record, while some may disagree, it is generally reported that light rail has increased revenue and recaptured a great deal of the money invested in it over a short period of time here in the Twin Cities - more success along those lines are anticipated.
 
SLM
No Party Affiliation
+1
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by gopher View Post

Over the years I have read conflicting reports about the merits of electric cars as opposed to light rail. That many believe society should emphasize creation of light rail for suburban and inner city commuters. It is said that such investments promote greater access to jobs and shopping thereby generating more social productivity and tax revenues. Individual electric cars are said to be economically unfeasible as electric charges can give only a very limited transportation range. That, by contrast, light rail and trackless trolleys have limitless range, cost far less to operate, use far less electricity, and raise social productivity. On that basis, society should invest more in this alternative.

Therefore, while producers may continue to explore the idea of creating more efficient electric autos, the better way for society to direct itself is in creating more light rail as its cost to society is far less while generating more business and social activity. For the record, while some may disagree, it is generally reported that light rail has increased revenue and recaptured a great deal of the money invested in it over a short period of time here in the Twin Cities - more success along those lines are anticipated.

I am all for investigating new, more efficient and cost effective ways of getting us around. Who wouldn't be? But I think implementing them before it's time, before it's actually more efficient or cost effective, is a huge mistake. Further to that, investing such a large sum in a province where hydro rates are skyrocketing and is a major concern to both business and individual consumers is reckless and wasteful.
 
gopher
No Party Affiliation
+2
#9
Quote:

SLM,

investing such a large sum in a province where hydro rates are skyrocketing and is a major concern to both business and individual consumers is reckless and wasteful.


I can certainly see your point since the Provinces do not generally have the same type of urban congestion we have in the big cities here in the States. Therefore, commutation is likelier a lot smoother than it is here. On that basis investments in light rail or other alternatives may not be as feasible as it is here.
 
SLM
No Party Affiliation
+1
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by gopher View Post

I can certainly see your point since the Provinces do not generally have the same type of urban congestion we have in the big cities here in the States. Therefore, commutation is likelier a lot smoother than it is here. On that basis investments in light rail or other alternatives may not be as feasible as it is here.

If we're talking about rail in Canada, then honestly I think what we would benefit better from is a high speed rail system. While the larger of the cities do indeed suffer from congestion problems no doubt, I think the vastness between our urban areas would benefit from more direct access and, consequently, that would also ease many of the congestion problems too as people who work in the cities could live farther out and commute much easier.
 
CDNBear
+2
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by gopher View Post

I can certainly see your point since the Provinces do not generally have the same type of urban congestion we have in the big cities here in the States. Therefore, commutation is likelier a lot smoother than it is here. On that basis investments in light rail or other alternatives may not be as feasible as it is here.

Actually, your transit system puts our to shame on several levels. But a lot of that has to do with your larger population.

But you make good points. I would suggest subways in the inner city with above ground high speed light rail connecting the sub-suburbs to the suburbs and urban areas.
 
SLM
No Party Affiliation
+1
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by CDNBear View Post

Actually, your transit system puts our to shame on several levels. But a lot of that has to do with your larger population.

But you make good points. I would suggest subways in the inner city with above ground high speed light rail connecting the sub-suburbs to the suburbs and urban areas.

If the provincial government is going to invest in transportation to that tune, I'd prefer they invest in GO transit rail or something similar.
 
CDNBear
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by SLM View Post

If the provincial government is going to invest in transportation to that tune, I'd prefer they invest in GO transit rail or something similar.

And take it back from Railink to start.
 
MHz
#14
Considering the spin-off industry jobs building batteries they mush have some plans to supply more power and at the same time lower gasoline production. With our funds tied up in war machines perhaps we will have to import it from Russia. Since this is a basket of clowns here the question is when you spin over an electric engine a certain amount of sparking will take and each spartk produces some ozone. Math question, how many EV in Toronto on a calm day before the downtown core sees a rise in ozone that makes it dangerous to men?
If we are going electric why not use Tesla methods where a genset put the power into the air via antenna pairs that are 6ft long and each vehicle would also have a similar pair and no battery is needed.
 
CDNBear
#15
ffs, lolz
 
petros
+2
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by CDNBear View Post

I'd also like to know how the increased hydro load will be dealt with.

They don't use hydro. They have batteries. Duh.
 
MHz
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

They don't use hydro. They have batteries. Duh.

He's definitely riding with you in your car.
 
lone wolf
Free Thinker
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

They don't use hydro. They have batteries. Duh.

And they recharge how?
 
MHz
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by CDNBear View Post

And take it back from Railink to start.

Which is easier, banking existing tracks or building a car that slides to the inside of the corner and tips so your drink doesn't fall over. Get to the 'station' and you drive your EV off the platform and for the rest of the day it moves 70ft containers around the area. Same engine, same 300kph top speed.
 
SLM
No Party Affiliation
+1
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by CDNBear View Post

And take it back from Railink to start.

Yeah, I know there are complaints and issues with GO, I'm just not familiar with the particulars. I don't have it in my area, I think the farthest they venture out of TO is Kitchener/Waterloo. Now I'm in London, that's a good two hours from downtown Toronto either by car or by Via rail. With a car, electric or otherwise, you also have to deal with parking issues.

But with a high speed direct rail system, I could conceivably work in downtown Toronto and continue living right where I am. Or with the right networks, I could work in Barrie, or someone in Barrie could work here in London, or maybe just come shopping. It all opens up the economies of these individual cities and serves to decongest the traffic situation on the 401 and in the larger cities too.

Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolf View Post

And they recharge how?

Unicorns. I'm betting it's unicorns.


I'll be disappointed if it isn't.
 
petros
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by MHz View Post

Which is easier, banking existing tracks or building a car that slides to the inside of the corner and tips so your drink doesn't fall over. Get to the 'station' and you drive your EV off the platform and for the rest of the day it moves 70ft containers around the area. Same engine, same 300kph top speed.

There are trains that lean instead of banking the track. Technology ya know.