Crafts, Sewing, Materials, Glues and Repair


s243a
#1
Anyone Sew? I don’t but I am thinking of learning so I can fix or modify some of my sporting equipment. (wrist guards and stuff). Since I want to use it for sporting equipment I want to use strong threads. I’ve read that Nylon and polyester are pretty strong. Nylon is stronger but polyester is sometimes used instead because Nylon is slippery. It is for this reason that this kite repair stite recommends polyester over Nylon
http://www.chicagokitesurfing.com/kiterepair.html

From what I read a top quality nylon thread is nylon 69. I am not sure what the 69 means maybe it just a number
http://www.cutsewservice.com/RIDE/In...?categoryid=11
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...m=180102913391

I am half thinking of buying a sewing machine but I don’t know if I can justify the expense. Maybe I should just get a shoe repair person or tailor to do repairs and modifications for me. I understand to work with industrial strength Nylon you need a sewing machine with a walking foot. It looks like it would cost me about 300 for such a machine:

http://www.cutsewservice.com/RIDE/In...tails&id=66508
http://cgi.ebay.ca/Industrial-Walking-Foot-Sewing-Machine-9-COMPLETE...

There are of course stronger threads then Nylon. For instance Kevlar. I am not sure if I need threads that strong and if sewing machines can work with them. I found a site that lists the various synthetic treads as well as their properties like tensile strength.

http://www.syntheticthread.com/kevlar.htm
 
westmanguy
#2
It would be alot easier to taking them into a sewing shop, and pay someone to do what you want done, and then save the time and hassle of learning everything...
 
karrie
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by s243a View Post

I am half thinking of buying a sewing machine but I donít know if I can justify the expense. Maybe I should just get a shoe repair person or tailor to do repairs and modifications for me.

I think it would be a wasted expense if you just jumped in and bought a machine. But, you can always invest in classes. Even in our tiny little city, you can get classes at a 'sew it yourself' shop. Or, you can phone around to your local seamstresses and see who'd be willing to do the alterations while letting you watch over their shoulder.

Another option is hand sewing if you are only doing a one batch, one time sort of deal. It's time consuming, especially being as precise as needed, but works well. When I do leather work, hand sewing is a must. Slow, and tedious, but worth it in the end.

Either a shop or a seamstress ought to be able to tell you more about the threads and such.

Best of luck!
 

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