Way too close: 18-meter asteroid zips between Earth & moon


B00Mer
+1
#1
Way too close: 18-meter asteroid zips between Earth & moon



An asteroid will speed past our planet on Sunday, practically shaving terrestrial space as the rock whizzes past Earth just one tenth of its distance from the moon. The rare occasion will be most clearly witnessed in the skies above New Zealand.

The space traveler was discovered at the end of august by the Catalina Sky Survey near Tucson, Arizona, and independently detected the next night by the Pan-STARRS 1 telescope, located on the summit of Haleakalā on Maui, Hawaii, according to NASA.

At its closest, asteroid 2014 RC will be mere 34,000km from New Zealand, while geosynchronous communications and weather satellites remain in a 36,000km orbit. Although closer than those satellites, it is guaranteed to pass our planet safely on September 7 at 18:18GMT (2:18pm EDT).

“While 2014 RC will not impact Earth, its orbit will bring it back to our planet's neighborhood in the future,” NASA officials said.

“The asteroid's future motion will be closely monitored, but no future threatening Earth encounters have been identified,” NASA reassured.

Traditionally, astronomers calculate the proximity between space objects as distances between their centers of mass, which in the case of our planet is the center of Earth’s core.

On Sunday asteroid 2014 RC will reach its 40,000km minimum from the Earth’s core. With the average radius of the Earth estimated to be about 6,371km, this means the 18-meter space rock will be actually less than 34,000km from the planet’s surface.

Still, according to NASA, it will be impossible to see the space rock passing by with the naked eye because it will be too dim even in good weather conditions, though amateur astronomers will have a chance to image the asteroid 2014 RC, which will be moving really fast to be tracked because of its closeness to Earth.

There will be two webcasts of the 2014 RC asteroid passing near the planet. One is being prepared by the Slooh Community Observatory (begins on September 7, 02:00 GMT/September 6, 10pm EDT), which often organizes online live broadcast of various celestial events, another one to be broadcasted by the Virtual Telescope Project (starting on September 6, 22:00 GMT/6pm EDT).

So far NASA has discovered over 10,000 objects in our solar system that have orbits passing near Earth.

source: http://rt.com/news/185204-asteroid-2...hronous-orbit/
 
MHz
#2
A skipping stone type would 'be interesting' if not for the noise that would deafen everybody and that lead to our extinction rather than the impact. The Whatt Syndrome as it wasn't to become known as. Huh? for short.
 
Walter
+3
#3  Top Rated Post
Too close would be it hitting us.
 
Praxius
+1
#4
18 metres doesn't sound very doomsday. I imagine it would flatten out a large chunk of land or cause one hell of a tsunami, but I don't think if it hit us, extinction would be in order.


The asteroid believed to have wiped out the dinosaurs was at least 10km in diameter. 18m is a mere nuclear bomb.
Last edited by Praxius; Sep 8th, 2014 at 08:22 AM..
 
Nuggler
+1
#5
New Zealand sounds just about right.

Maybe New Guinea..........yah...........new guinea.

Kerwhack!

OR..........the shifting sands of the Middle East.............BEST IDEA YET. Can we change the orbit slightly towards the places most inhabited by ISIS ?
 
taxslave
#6
Close only counts in horseshoes and hand grenades. But maybe we will have something new to blame weather on.
 
petros
+2
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

Close only counts in horseshoes and hand grenade.

And sh-t fights.
 
taxslave
+2
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

And sh-t fights.

Depends on moisture content.
 
petros
+2
#9
The dampness proves proximity is as good as a hit and close does include sh-t fights.
 
WLDB
#10
18 Metres wouldnt have been too bad. If it hit in the middle of nowhere itd be fine.
 
tay
#11
A mysterious explosion that rocked Nicaragua's crowded capital Managua, creating a large crater, appears to have been caused by a small meteorite, officials said Sunday.





Amazingly, in a sprawling city of 1.2 million people, the impact near the international airport did not cause any known injuries, but it did leave a crater measuring 12 meters (39 feet) across and was felt throughout the capital late on Saturday.




'Meteorite' smashes into Nicaraguan capital
 
MHz
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by WLDB View Post

18 Metres wouldnt have been too bad. If it hit in the middle of nowhere itd be fine.

I'm going to go with no strike is best based only the butterfly effect possibility. Little fire gets to be big fire and snow comes and freezes the crops 2 months early and the Northern Hemisphere dies off in the few months before winter sets in and that takes out the rest that had prepared for a disaster. I'm thinking the ones who get to see it up close could end up being the ones that endure the least amount of pain.

So does it mean one like in Russia couldn't be 100 times bigger but bounced back into space by the atmosphere compressing and rebounding? A lot of heat and a lot of sound but no material impacting. That would be the Russian event of early last century, the sound wave knocked the trees over just like the sound moved items. Do some math and you could get a sound level to go with the event. That would be well above hearing loss levels. Even if not killed outright that kind of damage makes long term survival impossible.

Quote: Originally Posted by tay View Post

Amazingly, in a sprawling city of 1.2 million people, the impact near the international airport did not cause any known injuries, but it did leave a crater measuring 12 meters (39 feet) across and was felt throughout the capital late on Saturday.

Flight 93 left a 'bigger hole'.
Any pics of the object to see it it is iron of something else? No forest burned down, not living up to the hype.
 
Praxius
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by tay View Post

A mysterious explosion that rocked Nicaragua's crowded capital Managua, creating a large crater, appears to have been caused by a small meteorite, officials said Sunday.

Amazingly, in a sprawling city of 1.2 million people, the impact near the international airport did not cause any known injuries, but it did leave a crater measuring 12 meters (39 feet) across and was felt throughout the capital late on Saturday.

'Meteorite' smashes into Nicaraguan capital

Aw, it was just a wee baby one, probably the size of a fridge.
 
petros
#14
Run a magnetic through your eavestroughs, chances are good a few have hit your roof and rolled into the gutter.
 
Retired_Can_Soldier
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by Praxius View Post

18 metres doesn't sound very doomsday. I imagine it would flatten out a large chunk of land or cause one hell of a tsunami, but I don't think if it hit us, extinction would be in order.


The asteroid believed to have wiped out the dinosaurs was at least 10km in diameter. 18m is a mere nuclear bomb.

more like burn up on entry
 
Praxius
#16
Well if it magically got through the atmosphere at that size (most that size do burn up) it would make a bit of a dent.

The one that his Siberia in 1908 was estimated at 60m-190m in size.

I guess 18m wouldn't be a nuclear bomb.... maybe a dirty bomb.
 
petros
#17
20kg space rock will bounce off lake ice.. They slow down considerably on entry.
 

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