Quit Picking on the Republicans


Locutus
#91
 
gopher
No Party Affiliation
+3 / -1
#92
Quote: Originally Posted by Locutus View Post






 
Tecumsehsbones
+3
#93
Embracing misinformation on Obama

By Dana Milbank

A poll of Louisiana Republicans released last week contained some strange news for President Obama: Twenty-nine percent of them said that he was responsible for the poor response to Hurricane Katrina — in 2005.

This was slightly more than the 28 percent who said President George W. Bush was to blame. An additional 44 percent thought it over but just weren’t sure.

This is a preposterous notion. Everybody knows Barack Obama couldn’t have been responsible for the Katrina response because he was in Indonesia in 2005, learning about his Muslim faith in a madrassa. He had moved to Indonesia directly from his home country of Kenya, stopping in the United States just long enough to fake the moon landing.

When I read a report about the poll on the Talking Points Memo Web site, the first thing that came to mind was the famous campaign-trail quotation from the man who actually was president in 2005: “Rarely is the question asked: Is our children learning.”

Evidently, they is not, at least not in Louisiana. Yet ignorance alone does not account for this bizarre finding.

The Katrina result, from the Democratic firm Public Policy Polling, is somewhat suspect because it is from an automated, push-button polling method. Yet the finding, if unscientific, is revealing: It shows that a substantial number of Republican voters will agree to something they know to be false if it puts Obama in a bad light.

The Katrina question is consistent with the many surveys finding an appalling amount of misinformation embraced by the electorate. Seven in 10 Americans believed that Saddam Hussein was responsible for the 9/11 attacks. One in five thought that Obama was Muslim. In another famous poll, Americans were three times more likely to be able to name two of the seven dwarfs than two Supreme Court justices.

Earlier this year, Public Policy Polling found disturbingly high levels of belief in UFOs and aliens, and the believers were bipartisan: Twenty-two percent of Mitt Romney voters said Obama was the Antichrist, and 13 percent of Obama voters said the government allowed the 9/11 attacks to occur.

But Obama’s presidency has provoked a particularly steep rise in the proportion of Republican conspiracy theorists. A Pew poll last year found that 30 percent of Republicans and 34 percent of conservative Republicans thought Obama was Muslim — roughly double than thought so four years earlier. Gallup polling in April 2011 found that 43 percent of Republicans thought Obama was born in another country.

Obama conspiracy theories have flourished in the Deep South, where wealth and educational levels are both low. This makes sense: Where voters are least informed, they are most susceptible to misinformation peddled by talk-radio hosts and the like.

For this reason, voters in reliably Republican states, which tend to be poorer, with lower test scores, are more vulnerable to misinformation. To use one measure, the 2011 National Assessment of Educational Progress test of eighth-grade reading, all but one of the top 10 states were in Obama’s column in 2012. Of the 19 doing worse than average, 14 were red states.

This is what makes the Katrina question so interesting. Certainly, Louisianans are on the low end of the education rankings, fifth from the bottom in math and third-to-last in reading. But this question got around the ignorance question by asking Louisiana Republicans about a topic they know intimately.

All but the most clueless had to know that Obama, a first-term senator in 2005, was not responsible for the botched storm response that Louisianans experienced up close and personally. It’s a notion so demonstrably false that they wouldn’t have heard anybody arguing for it on Fox News or talk radio. Yet 29 percent of Republican primary voters (the sample size was 274) reflexively endorsed the falsehood.

Why?

“Obama derangement syndrome is running pretty high right now among a certain segment of the Republican base,” Tom Jensen, director of Public Policy Polling, told me. “There’s a certain segment of people who say, ‘If you’re going to give me the opportunity to stick it to Obama, I’m going to take it.’ ”

In other words, a large number of that 29 percent who said Obama was responsible for the Katrina response knew that he wasn’t but saw it as a chance to register their displeasure with the president. Obama has driven a large number of Republican voters — Jensen puts it at 15 to 20 percent of the overall electorate — right off their rockers. And to that, there is only one thing to say.

Heckuva job, Barry.

Dana Milbank: Embracing misinformation on Obama - The Washington Post
 
gopher
No Party Affiliation
+3 / -1
#94
it's all so easy ......


Blame Obama!
 
EagleSmack
#95
 
gopher
No Party Affiliation
+3 / -1
#96
Republican brilliance:








Broken Record!
Broken Record!
Broken Record!
 
gopher
No Party Affiliation
+3 / -1
#97
Republicans, Over the Cliff



Republicans, Over the Cliff | The American Conservative




Peter Suderman speaks for me:
What Republicans have right now is a lot of talk. What they don’t have is a workable legislative strategy. Not on Obamacare. Not on the debt. Not on tax reform, the unsustainable entitlement state, or on any of the big domestic policy issues that Republicans say they care about, or that actually confront the nation today.
Part of coming up with a plausible strategy is going to be recognizing that right now, the GOP is the minority party in Congress, and that there are limits to what it can meaningfully accomplish until that changes.
They are a barking-mad pack of ideologues, is what they are. I haven’t written much about the Obamacare thing because I don’t follow policy closely. As far as I know, Obamacare is a bad idea. But here’s the thing: it’s the law. It was passed, signed by the president, and upheld in the Supreme Court. There is no way the House Republicans, or Ted Cruz or Rand Paul, is going to overturn it. The best they can do is to delay it. And then what? Guess what: the 2012 elections were their last, best chance to overturn Obamacare, and the country didn’t go for it.
There are other battles to fight. These guys are taking the government and the economy to the brink of crisis, and for what? For the sake of rebel yells and the Lost Cause? Larison:
This approach places great value on zeal and combativeness and isn’t very concerned with success. For that reason, it won’t produce the desired results at an acceptable political price. Cruz has railed against Republican defeatism, but in practice Cruz has made himself the leader of what one might call the defeat caucus.
Here’s Josh Marshall, making a good point:
Right now you might theorize that ‘Obamacare’ has somehow become such an idee fixe on the American right that some sort of cataclysmic confrontation is inevitable. But that theory doesn’t really hold up because for the previous two years it was austerity and dramatic fiscal retrenchment that merited threatening to default on the federal debt to deal with.
For all the ubiquity of political polarizing and heightened partisanship, no honest observer can deny that the rise of crisis governance and various forms of legislative hostage taking comes entirely from the GOP. I hesitate to state it so baldly because inevitably it cuts off the discussion with at least a sizable minority of the political nation. But there’s no way to grapple with the issue without being clear on this single underlying reality. Sufficient evidence of this comes from 2007 and 2008 when Democrats won resounding majorities in Congress and adopted exactly none of these tactics with an already quite unpopular President Bush. This is the reality that finally brought Thomas Mann and Norm Ornstein, two of DC’s most arbiters of political standards and practices, fastidiously sober, even-handed and high-minded, to finally just throw up their hands mid-last-year and say “Let’s just say it: The Republicans are the problem.”
More:
It has become so pervasive that I believe it’s lost on many of us just how far down the road of state breakdown and decay we’ve already gone. It is starting to seem normal what is not normal at all.
That’s it, I think. When I think of the Republican Party, I don’t think of principled conservative legislators who are men and women of vision strategy. I think of ideologues who are prepared to wreck things to get their way. They have confused prudence — the queen of virtues, and the cardinal virtue of conservative politics — with weakness. I know I’m very much a minority among conservatives in this, but the behavior of Congressional Republicans pushed me out of the party two years ago, even though I almost always vote Republican, or withhold my vote. I am not a liberal, and do not want to vote for liberals, especially on social policy. But I told a Louisiana conservative friend the other day that the Congressional Republicans are making me consider the previously unthinkable: throwing my vote away by voting for a Democrat in the special election next month to replace my GOP congressman, who just resigned to take another job. The GOP candidates in this local race are hot and heavy to overthrow Obamacare. I think about how poor this district is — 26 percent of the district lives in poverty, making it one of the poorest Congressional districts in America — and how badly we need jobs and economic growth, and I think: What kind of world do these people live in?
By the way, political analysts rate the Louisiana 5th district safe Republican; my frustration with the GOP candidates is almost certainly a marginal phenomenon. You could probably put all the conservatives in this district who are fed-up with this mess on my front porch, and still have room for the tuba players from the LSU Tiger Band. Still, there it is. I’m considering voting Democratic not because I believe in the Democrats, but because it has gotten to the point where they don’t unnerve me like the Republicans. As poor as our district is, these guys would make our economic situation even more parlous by shutting the government down to overturn what in any stable political environment would have been a settled law?
Consider one of Russell Kirk’s ten canons of conservative thought:
Fourth, conservatives are guided by their principle of prudence. Burke agrees with Plato that in the statesman, prudence is chief among virtues. Any public measure ought to be judged by its probable long-run consequences, not merely by temporary advantage or popularity. Liberals and radicals, the conservative says, are imprudent: for they dash at their objectives without giving much heed to the risk of new abuses worse than the evils they hope to sweep away. As John Randolph of Roanoke put it, Providence moves slowly, but the devil always hurries. Human society being complex, remedies cannot be simple if they are to be efficacious. The conservative declares that he acts only after sufficient reflection, having weighed the consequences. Sudden and slashing reforms are as perilous as sudden and slashing surgery.
What are the probable long-run consequences of shutting the US Government down over Obamacare? Do the Congressional Republicans care? Do they care what kind of damage they are doing to the ability of Congress to legislate effectively on all kinds of matters? The damage they are doing to the economic stability of the United States? This kind of brinksmanship might — might — have been defensible during the Obamacare fight, but today? I can’t see it. I can’t see any good coming out of this, at least any good that stands to outweigh the bad.
I regret to say how much it disappoints me to see Sen. Rand Paul being so near the center of this drama. At TAC, we don’t have editorial meetings and decide who our political BFFs are, but it will be obvious even to a casual reader that Rand Paul’s ideas find favor among our writers, in large part because of his leadership on foreign policy and civil liberties. I don’t know what my colleagues think of his part in the Obamacare defunding debacle, but I’ve watched it with dismay, not because I’m a particular fan of Obamacare, but because it seems like such a pointless, wasting cause. I’ve been thrilled by Sen. Paul’s leadership on foreign policy, so it’s especially disappointing to watch him waste so much capital on this lost cause.
Then again, as Ross Douthat wrote in a great column a couple of weeks ago:
Here’s the good news for Republicans: The party now has a faction committed to learning real lessons from the 2012 defeat, breaking with the right’s stale policy consensus and embracing new ideas on a range of issues, from foreign policy to middle-class taxes, the drug war to banking reform.
Here’s the bad news for Republicans: The party also has a faction committed to a reckless, pointless budget brinkmanship, which creates a perpetual cycle of outrage and disillusionment among conservatives and leaves Washington lurching from one manufactured crisis to the next.
Here’s the strange news for Republicans: These two factions are actually one and the same.
Douthat says Rand Paul is the politician to watch because he seems to get that in order to move the party in new and useful directions, you have to be able to talk to the base. In that sense, his having Ted Cruz’s back on the anti-Obamacare crusade could be strategically wise. Cruz is catching all the heat on the Senate side, while Paul is avoiding the spotlight, while shoring up his credentials with the base.
Maybe that’s what’s going on. I’ll try to be hopeful. Still, there’s no doubt in my mind who is responsible for the government shutting down: the GOP. I’m with John Avlon:
Divided government used to work—it created the Marshall Plan, civil rights legislation, and all the accomplishments of the Reagan era. Independent voters like me have traditionally voted for divided government in the hopes that it would restrain any one party’s impulse to ideologically over-reach by imposing common sense checks and balances. But divided government now looks like dysfunctional government. And despite the political security created by the rigged system of redistricting, Republicans may suddenly find the congressional midterms a referendum on their ability to get things done. The scorecard is ugly on that front, providing yet another reason for Democrats to accept a government shutdown, however painful.
There is the sense that maybe the stark stupidity of this conflict will break the hyper-partisan fever consuming our nation’s capital. Republicans are realizing that the angry conservative populist forces they empowered to achieve power have turned on them and are now actively restricting their ability to be taken seriously as a governing force. When President Obama sees negotiating with Iran as a more reasonable option than negotiating with Republicans over the debt ceiling, we are through the looking glass.
… It is pathetic that is has come to this: a great power that cannot agree on practical ways to keep its government functioning.

Right. The Republicans cannot govern. These people aren’t conservatives. They are radicals. What on earth would Russell Kirk say if he were alive to see this?










That's right folks - even the AMERICAN CONSERVATIVE publication admits it!
 
gopher
No Party Affiliation
+4 / -1
#98






New low! Congress, GOP popularity tanks amid shutdown





New low! Congress, GOP popularity tanks amid shutdown — MSNBC






Approval for Congress and the GOP hit all-time lows this week as the government shut down after lawmakers could not agree on a budget.
A mere 10% of Americans–the smallest approval rating for Congress in history–said they approve of Congress’ accomplishments, according to a new CNN/ORC International poll released Monday. Disapproval of federal lawmakers reached 87%.
Just 17% of the country–the lowest approval rating in Quinnipiac University’s polling–approved of the way GOP lawmakers are dealing with current issues, and 74% disapproved, according to a Quinnipiac University poll released Tuesday. That has ticked down two points from the August Quinnipiac results.
 
gopher
No Party Affiliation
+3 / -1
#99
24 Policies That Republicans Supported BEFORE They Were Against Them





24 Policies That Republicans Supported BEFORE They Were Against Them -




Since President Obama took the oath of office in January 2009, Republicans have reversed their stances on many different policies and beliefs. Here are 24 of them.
1. Health Care Mandates) Prior to the passage of the Affordable Care Act by Democrats, Republicans widely supported the idea of an individual health care insurance mandate, Newt Gingrich being perhaps the chief supporter. Republicans have always preached about how people need to take responsibility for themselves, and now that a law exists that makes people take responsibility, the GOP is rejecting it simply on the grounds that President Obama and the Democrats passed it.
2. The Nuclear START Treaty) Republicans shamelessly filibustered the ratification of the Obama START Treaty for quite a period of time and criticized it tremendously and continue to try and find ways to circumvent the treaty today. What Republicans conveniently forget is that Ronald Reagan, the man that Republicans worship like a God, negotiated the very first START Treaty which was signed by yet another Republican, George H. W. Bush in 1991. That treaty expired in 2009 so President Obama negotiated a new one to continue the Reagan legacy. But since President Obama negotiated this treaty, Republicans retreated from Reagan’s policy faster than the decade it took to create the START Treaty in the first place.
3. Dream Act) Immigration reform has been touted by Republicans for decades now. Reagan granted amnesty to millions of illegal immigrants in the 1980′s. Most recently, Republicans worked on immigration reform under the Bush Administration and failed. President Bush and Senator John McCain both supported immigration reform and were willing to cross the aisle to work with Democrats, most notably Edward Kennedy. All of that work and bipartisanship ceased after the 2008 Election. Staunchly opposed to President Obama and anything his administration supports, Republicans turned their backs on immigration reform in favor of militarizing the border and laws that violate the civil rights of Hispanics. Obama’s Dream Act would do much that Reagan would approve of, but Republicans refuse hear anything of it.
4. TARP) Republicans supported TARP when they helped pass it in response to the economic collapse in 2008. President Bush even signed the legislation into law. But since it’s been up to the guiding hands of President Obama to deal with TARP, Republicans have since revoked their support and have been highly critical even as they take credit for it when presenting stimulus checks to their local constituents. The fact is, TARP is successful because President Obama oversaw it and Republicans hate that fact.
5. Bail Out of Auto Industry) Republicans once supported this too but abandoned it once President Obama called for it. The auto industry is a vital manufacturing sector that supports millions of American jobs and Republicans WANTED the industry to fail simply because President Obama wanted the bail out. If it had failed, Republicans would have blamed President Obama for not supporting the American auto industry. The bail out has been a resounding success with most of the money plus interest paid back to the taxpayers. Mitt Romney has since tried to take credit for the idea because it has been so successful.
6. Israel Going Back To Pre-1967 Borders) Many Presidents have suggested this, even George H.W. Bush and George W. Bush. But once President Obama repeated it, Republicans immediately denounced the President and threw their support to Israel’s President. This action by Republicans is totally unprecedented. It is reprehensible for American politicians to support a foreign leader more than the American President. Imagine if the Republican Party had overtly supported Hitler over FDR during World War Two. The only reason Republicans are rejecting President Obama’s plan is because they cannot bring themselves to endorse any idea he suggests, even if it is a Republican one.
7. Gun Control) Republicans overwhelmingly reject any and all gun control measures today. Which is very strange considering Ronald Reagan himself supported the Brady Handgun Act. But, it’s still true. Republicans did indeed support gun control measures in the past. It’s different now. Today’s intolerant, prejudiced, and extremist Republican Party is only against gun control now because they believe there needs to be a war against liberals and minority groups. It’s all about fear and war.
8. Public Education) Even the Founding Fathers believed in education for all. Every Republican President in United States history has been supportive of the public education system in this country. Ronald Reagan campaigned on axing the Department of Education but not only did he NOT eliminate it, he amped up its budget. It is only now that President Obama seeks to improve the education system that Republicans are against public education. When President Bush sought to improve public education, Republicans were on board but now that Obama is President, Republicans have decided that all public schools are evil liberal institutions that must be destroyed.
9. Infrastructure Spending) Republicans have always believed in strong infrastructure, until now. Republicans used the power of the federal government to build the railroads in the 1860′s and 1870′s, the Panama Canal in the beginning of the 20th century, and the interstate highway system in the 1950′s. Yet when President Obama called for new infrastructure spending to improve America’s crumbling roads and bridges and to improve our rail lines, Republicans immediately reversed their long-held belief in a strong American infrastructure. Why? Because they hate President Obama and oppose everything he believes in, even if it was once a part of the Republican platform.
10. Child Labor Laws) This one is surprising. Republicans were the ones that championed child labor laws in the first place. Starting in 1852, in the once Republican state of Massachusetts, child labor laws have been fought for by both parties. The only opponent of child labor laws has traditionally been big business. Republicans tried to pass a Constitutional amendment in 1924 and it didn’t succeed. It wasn’t until Democrats passed the Fair Labor Standards Act that child labor laws became federal law. Republicans oppose child labor laws now because of their deep ties with corporations. The goal of the corporate world is to find cheap labor and because President Obama is against huge corporations, Republicans must stand with the corporations, even if that means killing child labor laws.






... more ....
 
gopher
No Party Affiliation
+3 / -1
#100
Honest Republican talks about the role played by today's Republicans and Tea Baggers:



Sen. John Danforth talks about Washington, Republican Party





Sen. John Danforth talks about Washington, Republican Party | ksdk.com






ST. LOUIS (KSDK) - A former Missouri senator is speaking out about the shutdown and has a message for current lawmakers.
Republican Sen. John Danforth describes Washington today as "completely broke," and he says the Tea Party is "trashing" the Republican Party.
Sen. Danforth is one of several former senators and representatives who have signed an open letter to lawmakers as part of an organization called Fix Our Debt. It is a bi-partisan group of former lawmakers demanding both parties make hard choices to reduce the nation's $17 trillion debt.
Sen. Danforth's criticism of those currently running the government is certainly bi-partisan, too. He blames, not just the Tea Party, but senate Democrats and the president for drawing what he calls, "no compromise, red lines."
The Fix Our Debt organization of former lawmakers has some fairly specific suggestions and dire warnings for lawmakers.
We have posted our entire interview with Sen. Danforth.

It can be found to the left of this story.
 
gopher
No Party Affiliation
+3 / -2
#101
Tea Baggers waive flag of treason and terrorism in Washington, DC rally:




 
Walter
+2 / -1
#102
Quote: Originally Posted by gopher View Post

Tea Partiers waive flag of treason and terrorism in Washington, DC rally:

Even Canadians have Confederate flags on their trucks and dorm rooms.
 
BaalsTears
-1
#103
Quote: Originally Posted by gopher View Post

Tea Baggers waive flag of treason and terrorism in Washington, DC rally:



The Stars and Stripes is the flag of past genocide and current imperialism. Your hatred is reciprocated measure for measure.
 
pgs
Free Thinker
+1
#104
Quote: Originally Posted by gopher View Post

Tea Baggers waive flag of treason and terrorism in Washington, DC rally:



Come on now Gopher even you can do better then that. Note the web page on the obviously photo shopped image DEMOCRATICUNDERGROUND.COM You certainly are unbiased and have no agenda Right ?
 
gopher
No Party Affiliation
+2 / -1
#105
Even the conservative Free Republic acknowledged that at least one Dixie flag was shown at that rally:


Liberals on Twitter: One idiot with Confederate flag at tea party rally = GOP is racist


And, as you know, it is the flag of treason.
 
BaalsTears
#106
There is no such thing as treason to the United States of America.
 
JLM
No Party Affiliation
+1
#107
Quote: Originally Posted by BaalsTears View Post

There is no such thing as treason to the United States of America.

You may want to Google Julius and Ethel Rosenberg and David Greenglass!
 
BaalsTears
#108
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

You may want to Google Julius and Ethel Rosenberg and David Greenglass!

Your point is well taken, however, the Rosenbergs, and Greenglass were executed around seventy years ago. Since then there have been no treason trials except for one against a Chinese American.
 
JLM
No Party Affiliation
#109
Quote: Originally Posted by BaalsTears View Post

Your point is well taken, however, the Rosenbergs, and Greenglass were executed around seventy years ago. Since then there have been no treason trials except for one against a Chinese American.

Greenglass is still alive in his 90s. The others were executed in '53.
 
gopher
No Party Affiliation
+2 / -1
#110
GOP Congressman Rips Tea Party Colleagues: 'I'm Not Sure They're Republicans'

Intra-party tensions are running high as end to shutdown nears.





GOP Congressman Rips Tea Party Colleagues: 'I'm Not Sure They're Republicans' - NationalJournal.com






''In a sign of the internal backlash against the right wing of the House Republican Conference, Louisiana Republican Charles Boustany questioned the political allegiances and motivations of his tea party-aligned colleagues and said they had put the GOP majority at risk in the current shutdown fight.
"There are members with a different agenda," Boustany said Wednesday in an interview in his office. "And I'm not sure they're Republicans and I'm not sure they're conservative."



... nor American
 
BaalsTears
#111
There is absolutely no reason for loyalty to the USA.
 
JLM
No Party Affiliation
#112
Quote: Originally Posted by BaalsTears View Post

There is absolutely no reason for loyalty to the USA.

Is that your philosophy on how to treat your neighbour? They've certainly never done me any harm!
 
BaalsTears
#113
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

Is that your philosophy on how to treat your neighbour? They've certainly never done me any harm!

My neighbors live in my neighborhood. We get along just fine.
 
JLM
No Party Affiliation
#114
Quote: Originally Posted by BaalsTears View Post

My neighbors live in my neighborhood. We get along just fine.

I'm talking about internationally! -
 
BaalsTears
#115
Quote: Originally Posted by JLM View Post

I'm talking about internationally! -

America treats Mexico very well. Whatever Mexico wants it gets.
 
hunboldt
Free Thinker
+2
#116
Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

Even Canadians have Confederate flags on their trucks and dorm rooms.

Walt, its a free country. EXACTLY what the e-Heck are you complaining about now ?
 
gopher
No Party Affiliation
+5 / -2
#117
Unable to Accept Defeat, Republicans Blame Media for Surrender on Shutdown Deal

Forward Progressives — Unable to Accept Defeat, Republicans Blame Media for Surrender on Shutdown Deal


Before the government was shut down due to right-wing antics in Congress, anyone with half a brain knew they stood absolutely no chance at accomplishing their goal of defunding, defeating or repealing “Obamacare.” This wasn’t some partisan opinion based on left-wing talking points, it was just basic facts conjured from easy to understand reality.
So as news has broken that the Senate has agreed upon a deal which should pass the House, thus reopening our government and raising the debt ceiling, you just had to know Republicans weren’t going to accept the blame from the majority of the American people for the shutdown.
Oh no. It wasn’t their false rhetoric that this shutdown would end up with the defeat of “Obamacare,” or the fact that Boehner refused to let the House vote on the Senate’s clean resolution that would have passed the House and kept the government open. Nope, those aren’t the reasons why they lost and have come out of this whole ordeal looking like a bunch of fools.
It’s the media’s fault. The media is to blame for why the majority of the American people put the blame on the Republican party for this shutdown.




Blame Democrats
Blame Obama
Blame the Media






As always, the Republicans and their fellow Tea Baggers refuse to accept the blame for any problem they cause.
 
gopher
No Party Affiliation
+5 / -1
#118





Small wonder why Republican ratings are at their lowest in history.
 
captain morgan
Bloc Québécois
+1
#119
Sounds like you trying to convince yourself more than anyone else
 
Sal
No Party Affiliation
+2
#120
Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

Even Canadians have Confederate flags on their trucks and dorm rooms.

what "kind" of Canadians ...
 

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