Assisted living type of home


saltyangel
#1
For seniors and people with disabilities that are willing to relocate we are an assisted living type of home in the quaint little town of Listowel Ontario. We offer private rooms, some with private baths, three meals a day and evening snack. There is laundry, light house keeping, medication dispensing as well as 24 hour staff. We are located in a small town within walking distance of all the amenities of downtown including all major banks, Giant Tiger, post office, a walk-in clinic and the hospital. We offer reasonable rates and a friendly atmosphere. Come join our family. For information call (Pat or Stephanie) 226-640-0052 or (Dave) 519-492-1017.
 
MHz
#2
If you are ever thinking of expanding west there is a lovely spot along HWY 40 that would be suitable for a complex of that nature. A few years ago the Province was going to build a rehab near there but it was too close to being pristine foothills country. This location is quite close to that sort of country. Set up some remote cameras and big screens around the facility.

Because it is a place for old folks are you pushing for changes in assisted suicide so the old aren't kept alive longer than they want to? That is a serious question, the next part is just as serious, in the activity section why not a facility that would follow the theme of 'Last Ride Water Park and Crematorium and there is a location close by that could have runs that are a full km long and at a gentle slope, others are very steep and very fast, not something a frail person would survive but the visiting younger crowd would have a blast. Zip-lines and rocket powered sled on rail is also something that would fit in activity that is deadly to the really old people. The same location has HWY 666 that would be a marketing goldmine to the right crowd.

It is probably just an accident but beds in the old folks home these days just about covers what they clients get in OAS benefits.
 
captain morgan
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by saltyangel View Post

For seniors and people with disabilities that are willing to relocate we are an assisted living type of home in the quaint little town of Listowel Ontario. We offer private rooms, some with private baths, three meals a day and evening snack. There is laundry, light house keeping, medication dispensing as well as 24 hour staff. We are located in a small town within walking distance of all the amenities of downtown including all major banks, Giant Tiger, post office, a walk-in clinic and the hospital. We offer reasonable rates and a friendly atmosphere. Come join our family. For information call (Pat or Stephanie) 226-640-0052 or (Dave) 519-492-1017.



What's the cost per person (approximately)?
 
MHz
#4
You looking for a place??
 
captain morgan
+1
#5  Top Rated Post
Elder care will be a massive industry in the very near future.

A friend of mine shopped for a place for his dad who required more specialized care than what he could deliver. Nothing super intense, but basically wanted a place with access to folks that could be there at all times.

The costs he came across were anywhere from $4,000 to $7,000 a month.
 
tay
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

Elder care will be a massive industry in the very near future.

A friend of mine shopped for a place for his dad who required more specialized care than what he could deliver. Nothing super intense, but basically wanted a place with access to folks that could be there at all times.

The costs he came across were anywhere from $4,000 to $7,000 a month.

Yes it depends on the kind of care the person requires.
If they are fairly independent the cost is lower but if they require lots of attention it's costly.......
 
MHz
+1
#7
The best option for the old ones is still to be cared for by their natural family, either that or give them the assisted suicide option. The terminally ill can bet a bed covered by the Government. What is really crooked is paying for the bed before you are even a resident there. I'm pretty sure I can find a brochure that stipulates that.
 
captain morgan
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by MHz View Post

The best option for the old ones is still to be cared for by their natural family,

Absolutely, although people are living much longer lives and not only does this require more care physically but also the mental health issues start to play a role.

This was the case with my friend's dad, he was suffering from dementia and there was a real fear that his confusion might lead to problems
 
tay
#9
So what happens to people who have no family and can't afford a place?
Are there govt facilities that look after them......?
 
captain morgan
+1
#10
Pretty much... These facilities do exist but there is no where near enough room to accommodate everyone

One of the trends today are that a number of seniors end up basically living in the local hospital and taking up beds... An extremely expensive way to do things, but that's the way it is
 
justlooking
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by tay View Post

So what happens to people who have no family and can't afford a place?
Are there govt facilities that look after them......?

There are, but it's better to just die than to go to them.

Whoever can figure out a way of delivering good care at a reasonable price
is going to make a fortune.
 
TenPenny
+1
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by MHz View Post

The best option for the old ones is still to be cared for by their natural family,



Yes, because everyone is capable of quitting work to look after a dementia patient 24/7/365.

Quote: Originally Posted by tay View Post

So what happens to people who have no family and can't afford a place?
Are there govt facilities that look after them......?



Uh, yeah. That's how it works in Canada.
 
DaSleeper
#13
Folks ...Just google the phone #
This is the pace advertized on KiJiJi. Facebook etc.

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Li....9568841?hl=en
Last edited by DaSleeper; Oct 25th, 2017 at 01:29 PM..
 
saltyangel
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by DaSleeper View Post

Folks ...Just google the phone #
This is the pace advertized on KiJiJi. Facebook etc.

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Li....9568841?hl=en

That is our ad. This is the place that I live and we have a lot of rooms available because people do not want to relocate.
 
MHz
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by justlooking View Post

There are, but it's better to just die than to go to them.

Whoever can figure out a way of delivering good care at a reasonable price
is going to make a fortune.

Combine orphanages and old folks homes into one unit and have the 12-16 being a major part of who the care givers are.

Quote: Originally Posted by TenPenny View Post

Yes, because everyone is capable of quitting work to look after a dementia patient 24/7/365.

Cure them of it and you will both be a lot happier.

Quote: Originally Posted by saltyangel View Post

That is our ad. This is the place that I live and we have a lot of rooms available because people do not want to relocate.

See my orphan comment, perhaps that will solve the empty beds issue.
 
tay
#16
The largest grouping of long-term care operators in Ontario is calling for a dramatic increase in spending on nursing homes.

The province should create 10,000 new long-term care beds in the next five years and boost its subsidy for older nursing homes to rebuild, says the Ontario Long-Term Care Association (OLTCA) in its pre-budget submission to the government, released Wednesday.

The document, called "More Care. Better Care" indicates that 32,000 people are on the waiting list for spots in long-term care homes in Ontario, a number that is growing by 15 per cent annually.

"I'm optimistic that we're going to see some movement," said Candace Chartier, chief executive of the OLTCA, during a speech to reveal the budget proposal. "Hopefully we'll see more beds, more staff, more investment into the care that we need to look after our seniors."

Hazel McCallion, 96, the former mayor of Mississauga, was at the launch and endorsed the association's push.

"The province has got to start making some decisions on long-term care," said McCallion. "The need for long-term care is building every day in the province and if the beds are not provided, it's going to become a crisis situation."

The association is calling for a 24 per cent increase in the provincial subsidy to older nursing homes that need to redevelop to meet new Ministry of Health standards for space and facilities.

More than 300 such homes across Ontario are slated to be rebuilt by 2025 but so far, says the report, "progress is less than slow." The association says the size of the subsidy is "one of the biggest issues keeping long-term care operators from moving ahead with redevelopment."

The current subsidy works out to $19.4 million for an average 128-bed nursing home, to be paid out over a 25-year period.
CBC News reported Tuesday that the operators of eight long-term-care homes in Toronto with nearly 1,300 residents have told the province they intend to shut down and move their operations elsewhere because the subsidy is not enough given the cost of rebuilding in the city.

Chartier tried to downplay the risk of the homes leaving.

"We know the cost of land and availability of land and you name it are issues, but we think we can come up with some solutions," she said. "What about the vacant school land? What about lease-to-own?"

more

Nursing home group wants more beds, bigger construction subsidy - Toronto - CBC News
 
Johnnny
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by saltyangel View Post

For seniors and people with disabilities that are willing to relocate we are an assisted living type of home in the quaint little town of Listowel Ontario. We offer private rooms, some with private baths, three meals a day and evening snack. There is laundry, light house keeping, medication dispensing as well as 24 hour staff. We are located in a small town within walking distance of all the amenities of downtown including all major banks, Giant Tiger, post office, a walk-in clinic and the hospital. We offer reasonable rates and a friendly atmosphere. Come join our family. For information call (Pat or Stephanie) 226-640-0052 or (Dave) 519-492-1017.

 
tay
+1
#18
I just spent 3 weeks in the hospital for a hip replacement, not my choice but it had to be done. The last week I was put into a semi-room with an elderly fellow who had the same procedure. He was also suffering from dementia. He was always trying to get out of bed, day and night, and I had to keep calling the nurses to control him. Eventually they were rolling him out in front of the nurses station to control him.

Just saying when people are sick mentally like this fellow it's very hard to control them as nothing you say to them registers for more than 10 minutes. I am in no way endorsing the actions outlined below but I can see where it's a real problem controlling these patients and I have no idea on how to contain them in a humane way. On my 2nd last day his family had him moved to a home somewhere.....


Reports reveal 46 abuse cases over 2 years in Nova Scotia nursing homes


Residents at long-term care facilities in Nova Scotia were physically, emotionally or sexually abused or not provided adequate care in at least 46 confirmed cases over a two-year period, a CBC News investigation has learned.

At least half of those cases involve abuse by a staff member. Physical and emotional abuse, or a combination of the two, were the most common type of confirmed abuse during the period examined, 2015 and 2016. On seven occasions, staff failed to provide adequate food, medical care or other necessities of life. There was one case of sexual abuse by a staff member.

Reports about the incidents obtained by CBC News under the Freedom of Information Act were heavily redacted, but some of the directives from the province to the facilities in question are not.

They include orders to train staff on recognizing "escalating situations," signs of abuse and the duty to report allegations. In some cases, there are orders to train staff on dealing with patients with dementia, answering call bells in a "safe and appropriate time frame," treating wounds properly and doing routine checks to be sure residents are safe.

more

Reports reveal 46 abuse cases over 2 years in Nova Scotia nursing homes - Nova Scotia - CBC News
 
Danbones
+1
#19
I volunteer with the homeless here in Midland Ont, many are on disability or old age.
We have a hard time finding empty places to put them.

How are you with druggies, pill heads, alcoholics, and somewhat slow or slightly insane people or various combinations there of...?
( most are not too bad while on their meds)

Well, we are having trouble placing a one legged heroin addict and some single fathers.

Hey! You guys have a yarn factory outlet nearby!!!

Perfect!
Last edited by Danbones; Oct 26th, 2017 at 05:30 AM..
 
tay
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by Danbones View Post

I volunteer with the homeless here in Midland Ont, many are on disability or old age.
We have a hard time finding empty places to put them.

How are you with druggies, pill heads, alcoholics, and somewhat slow or slightly insane people or various combinations there of...?
( most are not too bad while on their meds)

Actually I think he went to Midland. Some sort of place where he would be for a few months to work on his dementia type issues.
I was trying to express how challenging it is to control people like him from hurting themselves. If he had gotten out of bed and fallen that would have been a real problem for him.


As for the other people you mention I have no idea on a solution....
 
Danbones
#21
Yeah, the mental problems often turn out to have missed physical causes, or they have them on the wrong drugs while they thrash around looking for the right answer, and that can be a big problem too while those people wander around in the mean time.

We have a large mental health hospital near by, and a super jail, so we get some of the pegs that don't quite fit those holes, but the shelter here is pretty solid. Clean, well fed, it's a peaceful town, decent community...not too many homeless people haters. But not a lot of casual jobs that people can start up with from the street.

Welfare office is on the ball here. Wish I could say that about the ODSP system...The mental health system lets a few slip through the cracks too...

The trouble is we have a 14 person limit for over nights, after that where do you put them?
There is also a collage here too, so we fight with them for long term spaces too.
 
Curious Cdn
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by MHz View Post

Combine orphanages and old folks homes into one unit and have the 12-16 being a major part of who the care givers are.

Combine those two with your local electrical utility and you can put the orphans and old people to work in tread mills generating electricity during peak demand periods,
 
Danbones
#23
Yup, that's about 250 watts times 8 hours a day plus overtime

What the hell else they gonna do when the robots take over?

We be workin on the power plantation massa!

Somebody got to feed those little bastids
 
taxslave
+1
#24
Quote: Originally Posted by saltyangel View Post

That is our ad. This is the place that I live and we have a lot of rooms available because people do not want to relocate.

Until Globull warming kicks I don't expert anyone to want to move to Ontario. A rasin warehouse in igloo country just isn't good for old bones.
 
saltyangel
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by Danbones View Post

I volunteer with the homeless here in Midland Ont, many are on disability or old age.
We have a hard time finding empty places to put them.

How are you with druggies, pill heads, alcoholics, and somewhat slow or slightly insane people or various combinations there of...?
( most are not too bad while on their meds)

Well, we are having trouble placing a one legged heroin addict and some single fathers.

Hey! You guys have a yarn factory outlet nearby!!!

Perfect!

To answer some of the questions you have is hard to do. I will tell you more about our place and you can see if it fits for any of your clients. I may not be 100% correct on everything as I am only a resident/volunteer. First off we are able to keep our costs down as we do not hire PSWs, our staff are just regular workers. Our clients have outside agencies come in and assess them and provide some of the services needed. We are not like a nursing home we are more like a group home. We have elderly people, one person in a wheelchair and I am one of about 3 people that use a walker. We have a wheelchair ramp to the main floor of the house and on the main floor you will find the kitchen, dinning room, TV room and about 15 resident rooms. We have people that suffer with depression, addictions, and schizophrenia so there is a wide assortment of people. We have a zero tolerance of alcohol and drug use in the building and smoking is only permitted outside. The rooms are different sizes so it is hard to include a price, I believe the price range is between $900 and $1500 a month depending on the size of the room and the services needed. My suggestion since Midland is only 185km from Listowel is that someone might be interested in coming for a visit to see just what we have to offer. It would be another option for any of your clients willing to relocate. We have a total of about 49 rooms in the big house and another 6 or 7 in the rooming house next door. We have lots of rooms available as we only have about 50% occupancy.
And yes we have a yarn mill and discount store close by. Spinrite it is about 3 to 4 blocks from the house. I walk over there myself with my walker. Great place.
 
darkbeaver
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morgan View Post

Elder care will be a massive industry in the very near future.

A friend of mine shopped for a place for his dad who required more specialized care than what he could deliver. Nothing super intense, but basically wanted a place with access to folks that could be there at all times.

The costs he came across were anywhere from $4,000 to $7,000 a month.

WHATTHEFUK??????????????????? I hope I die before I get old. I,m not paying that kind of coin to have my diapers changed. I'll just keep doing it myself.

Being assisted for 4 to 7 grand a month? I'd rather be beaten and robbed.
 
Curious Cdn
+1
#27
Quote: Originally Posted by darkbeaver View Post



Being assisted for 4 to 7 grand a month? I'd rather be beaten and robbed.

You probably will be anyway, even after shelling out 80 grand a year.
 
Retired_Can_Soldier
#28
I have a 91 year-old Mother in-law who also happens to have O.C.D. She still has most of her faculties, no dementia, but she is now at an age where she needs help with everything including bathing. We need to invest more in assisted living for seniors.
 
saltyangel
#29
Quote: Originally Posted by Retired_Can_Soldier View Post

I have a 91 year-old Mother in-law who also happens to have O.C.D. She still has most of her faculties, no dementia, but she is now at an age where she needs help with everything including bathing. We need to invest more in assisted living for seniors.

You are absolutely right after all it is people like your 91 year old mother in law that worked and built this country. We need to honor them for that.
 
darkbeaver
#30
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious Cdn View Post

You probably will be anyway, even after shelling out 80 grand a year.

Fuk that I will leave the party early on my feet and take money with me.
 

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