Capitalism will save this world


Hoid
#2641
In Canada a person making $20,000 a year pays a higher rate of tax than a corporation making billions in profits (and shipping that money out of Canada)
 
AnnaE
+1
#2642
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

Check out what some of those charities pay their management team and how much they spend in advertising. It might change your definition of greed. And corporate greed is nothing compared to civil service greed. Or political for that matter.

uuummmm there's a difference between human charity and a charity organisation.
 
AnnaE
#2643
Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

Most people do not rely on charity.

Those corporations are composed of charitable people to a point. DUH If they were completely greedy, their employees wouldn't be employees, they'd be slaves.
 
Twin_Moose
+1
#2644
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

In Canada a person making $20,000 a year pays a higher rate of tax than a corporation making billions in profits (and shipping that money out of Canada)

What's the tax rate on the share holders at the second level of taxes toward corporations?
 
Mowich
+3
#2645
Mark Carney’s “Greta” Finance Model

Depending on the part of the world you’re in, the mention of economist, Mark Carney, will elicit different responses. In Canada, Carney is widely credited with steering the country through the rocky waters of the 2008 financial crisis, but in the United Kingdom he is often labeled a political activist disguised as an economist.

I have previously written about Carney’s time as Governor of the Bank of England, a role he will leave on January 31. Through analysis of predictions made by the Bank of England relating to the impact of the Brexit vote, I argued that Carney had made a radical shift from economist and strategist to political activist with a clear agenda. Following the election of Boris Johnson as Prime Minister, and the realisation that Brexit is actually going to happen, the Bank of England wasforced to peddle back some of its predictions of impending economic crisis and now it seems that Carney has found a fresh cause to campaign for. In December 2019, United Nations Secretary General Antonio Guterres announced that Carney would lead a new push to ensure the financial sector embraces “climate emergency” issues, and will serve as the U.N. special envoy on climate action. It is a natural fit for Carney, who has been warning how climate change could “cause a new crash” since 2015.

In a statement, Carney said that the disclosures of climate risk “must become comprehensive” and that “investing for a net-zero world must go mainstream” —an assertion that demonstrates Carney’s willingness to advocate a political position while, at the same time, warning businesses that if they refuse to adapt to his vision then they could face severe financial penalty. Carney isn’t afraid to throw his weight around either. As the chief of the Financial Stability Board he directed companies to disclose potential risks they face as a result of climate change, despite bankers and finance professionals not identifying any imminent threat. The direction was widely criticised as little more than a vanity project.

In October 2019, Carney said that transition to net zero carbon emissions would change the value of every asset and raise the risk of shocks to the financial system. He is right. The value of assets in the fossil fuel industry will change, coal-fired plants are closing in major economies like the United States—but global energy demands are enormous and growing. President Donald Trump has demonstrated his commitment to protecting the coal industry and has proposed relaxing environmental regulation to make it easier to establish new oil drilling sites and coal mines. As it stands, renewable energy cannot meet the global economy’s growing demands for energy. The United States still relies on fossil fuels for 80 percent of its energy needs. In Canada, fossil fuels account for almost 90 percent of domestic energy production. In 2018, BloombergNEF’s annual survey of over 100 developing markets found that investments in solar, wind, and other renewable energy projects fell to $133B, down $33B from the year previous. Clean energy investments in India are declining as the nation struggles to keep up with its growing energy demands, and China is relying on more coal than ever before.

However well-intentioned it may be, the renewable energy industry isn’t ready for primetime yet, and the movement behind it has a tendency of attracting extreme-left, progressive ideologues. It is simply true that current renewable energy technology cannot satisfy demand and the costs are often prohibitive. Fossil fuel is not going away any time soon and Carney’s warnings, when put into the context of his tales of a Brexit economic doomsday, resemble threats more than honest analysis.

It is hard to ignore the political and professional affiliations of his wife too. Diana Carney is an environmental activist who was previously the Vice President of Research at progressive think tank Canada2020 and is an ambassador for the WWF. As Executive Director of Pi Capital, her work focused on “climate and energy issues” and “identifying pathways for more sustainable capitalism.” She supports green economy initiatives and is recognized globally as a leading campaigner for radical policy to address what she identifies as a climate emergency.

The parallels between Diana Carney’s work and Mark Carney’s recent interventions in finance have not gone unnoticed. It is an issue that has been long-discussed, and the couple even insisted in April 2013 that they are separate people with separate opinions. Events since then appear to suggest otherwise.

In fact, Carney’s vanity projects and haughty attempts to ensure businesses abide by rules dictated by his and his wife’s worldview pose two questions. The first is, why should we trust Mark Carney in the first place? Why should businesses believe the words of a man who showed disdain for the Brexit decision made by the British people, and who willingly incorporates the political agenda of his wife into his work as a leading global economist?

Secondly, it raises the question of whether he is suited to being a leading voice on such a divisive political issue. If consensus, or even compromise, is ever to be reached on the topic of climate change and renewable technology, is Mark Carney really the man to do it, or, is he another ideologue that represents establishment scorn for regular people?

Carney is quickly turning into the Greta Thunberg of finance, only it’s his wife pulling the strings and not his parents.

fcpp.org/2020/01/28/mark-carneys-greta-finance-model/
 
petros
+5
#2646
Quote: Originally Posted by Dixie Cup View Post

my boss was NEVER at home; he was on the road looking for business & customers all over the province. His wife and family suffered because he was busy building his business but he was never at home. After over 10 years of going all over hells half-acre, he is now able to have others do the job he had initially and can now concentrate on keeping & improving on the business. I would not, for 1 minute, want to have to go through what he did for all those years simply to build a business. You have to have a passion for what you're doing to be so focused and driven and I don't have that. Most people don't. That doesn't even cover the "risk" he made in investing his own resources into building the business.

I went through that. I missed 7 years of my daughter growing up and a slough of other sacrifices.

It's still sweet f-ck all when compared to what my great and grandparents who started their lives in Canada from scratch went through to ensure my future.
 
taxslave
+5
#2647
Quote: Originally Posted by Hoid View Post

In Canada a person making $20,000 a year pays a higher rate of tax than a corporation making billions in profits (and shipping that money out of Canada)

Bullshit. A person making $20g a year doesn't pay any net taxes.
 
Walter
+2
#2648
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

Bullshit. A person making $20g a year doesn't pay any net taxes.

More’s the pity.
 
AnnaE
#2649
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslave View Post

A person making $20g a year doesn't pay any net taxes.

Corporations making billions (in the USA) pay a small token rate and nothing if they transfer profits offshore.. Trump and cronies essentially voided their income taxes. Before Trump, the effective rate they paid was under 25% (the marginal rate was 35%). After Trump messed with the tax, it is marginally 21% and effectively less than 11%.
 
pgs
+1
#2650
Quote: Originally Posted by AnnaE View Post

Corporations making billions (in the USA) pay a small token rate and nothing if they transfer profits offshore.. Trump and cronies essentially voided their income taxes. Before Trump, the effective rate they paid was under 25% (the marginal rate was 35%). After Trump messed with the tax, it is marginally 21% and effectively less than 11%.

Sucks to be us .
 
Walter
+1
#2651
Quote: Originally Posted by AnnaE View Post

Corporations making billions (in the USA) pay a small token rate and nothing if they transfer profits offshore.. Trump and cronies essentially voided their income taxes. Before Trump, the effective rate they paid was under 25% (the marginal rate was 35%). After Trump messed with the tax, it is marginally 21% and effectively less than 11%.

Corporations do not pay taxes.
 
pgs
+2
#2652
Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

Corporations do not pay taxes.

Some people don’t understand their is only one taxpayer .
 
AnnaE
-1
#2653
Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

Corporations do not pay taxes.

uuummmm Yes, that is what I was saying. Happy to see you understand something for a change.
 
petros
+2
#2654
Quote: Originally Posted by AnnaE View Post

Corporations making billions (in the USA) pay a small token rate and nothing if they transfer profits offshore.. Trump and cronies essentially voided their income taxes. Before Trump, the effective rate they paid was under 25% (the marginal rate was 35%). After Trump messed with the tax, it is marginally 21% and effectively less than 11%.

After paying dividends there isnt anything to move offshore or tax.
 
Walter
+1
#2655
Quote: Originally Posted by AnnaE View Post

uuummmm Yes, that is what I was saying. Happy to see you understand something for a change.

Corporations have never paid taxes.
 
AnnaE
#2656
Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

Corporations have never paid taxes.

lol If you say so, it must be "alternative fact".
 
Walter
+1
#2657
Quote: Originally Posted by AnnaE View Post

lol If you say so, it must be "alternative fact".

Corporations just pass the tax bill on to their customers.
 
AnnaE
#2658
Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

Corporations just pass the tax bill on to their customers.

Wrong. Corporations pay taxes then get reimbursed by customers and clients.
 
Walter
+2
#2659
Quote: Originally Posted by AnnaE View Post

Wrong. Corporations pay taxes then get reimbursed by customers and clients.

Same thing, there is only one taxpayer and a corporation ain’t it.
 
Cliffy
-1
#2660
 
DaSleeper
+2
#2661
Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

https://scontent.fyka1-1.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/s960x960/50734618_10205563833530938_6941036161041170432_o.j pg?_nc_cat=100&_nc_ohc=7T-ikpUHnB4AX_XLL9v&_nc_ht=scontent.fyka1-1.fna&oh=355af062c610b69ff6ea49511c5e6123&oe=5ED5F A49


 
AnnaE
#2662
Quote: Originally Posted by Walter View Post

Same thing, there is only one taxpayer and a corporation ain’t it.

I'd stay away from business if I were you.
 
petros
+1
#2663
Why?
 
Walter
#2664
Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

Prog shit.
 
petros
+3
#2665
The machine that gives the money machine value is goods and services. Humans sell their goods, skills or labour to the highest bidder. It doesnt get any more free.

Motivated people unlike Cliff with no fortitude, confidence, personality, or intelligence can always find work to be able eat, have a home, raise children without suffering or they can piss it away, live in a camper in the woods drinking and doing dope but you will not starve or die from treatable maladies.

Discipline and mastering a skill sets even a ditch digger up. The most disciplined and skilled ditch digger will always make more and enjoy life more than the lazy undisciplined stoner with a shitty attitude.

-Peter G. Romanoff
Last edited by petros; Feb 8th, 2020 at 12:37 AM..
 
Cliffy
-1
#2666
 
Walter
#2667
Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

Prog shit.
 
pgs
+1
#2668
Quote: Originally Posted by petros View Post

The machine that gives the money machine value is goods and services. Humans sell their goods, skills or labour to the highest bidder. It doesnt get any more free.

Motivated people unlike Cliff with no fortitude, confidence, personality, or intelligence can always find work to be able eat, have a home, raise children without suffering or they can piss it away, live in a camper in the woods drinking and doing dope but you will not starve or die from treatable maladies.

Discipline and mastering a skill sets even a ditch digger up. The most disciplined and skilled ditch digger will always make more and enjoy life more than the lazy undisciplined stoner with a shitty attitude.

-Peter G. Romanoff

Yes but to throw it all away and up and quit , yikes must be lots of demons inhabiting those closets .
 
Cliffy
#2669
 
Walter
#2670
Quote: Originally Posted by Cliffy View Post

Communist shit.
 

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