Farmers call for return of Canadian Wheat Board


tay
#1
Alliance says cutting of marketing system led to $6.5B loss in 2 years


More than 50 farmers from the Swan River and Pelly areas of Manitoba and Saskatchewan met February 10, 2016 and unanimously passed a resolution calling for the re-establishment of the Canadian Wheat Board (CWB), and single-desk selling of grain in western Canada.

Kyle Korneychuk, spokesperson for the Canadian Wheat Board Alliance, an independent and non-partisan prairie-wide farm group noted: “The fact a farm meeting of this size could unanimously pass this resolution is a strong indication to Ottawa that farmers are now feeling the loss of the CWB in their pocketbooks.”

Korneychuk thanked the Manitoba Minister of Agriculture Ron Kostyshyn and elected Rural Municipal (RM) Councillors from both provinces for their support at the meeting. “Farmers respect those who consistently support them as this Minister has demonstrated.”

Responding to a study by Dr. Richard Gray of the University of Saskatchewan showing farmers lost about 6.5 billion dollars in the past two years; Agriculture Minister Kostyshyn said he is “very concerned about the financial situation of farmers since the loss of the CWB.” The Minister also expressed concern about the future of the rail line to the Swan River valley as well as the rail line to Churchill. RM Councillors expressed concerns about the recent closures of elevators and the long-term implications for the rail line.

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Meeting unanimously passes resolution supporting reinstating the CWB – mySteinbach News (external - login to view)
 
eh1eh
#2
Wasn't so long ago they were squealing like stuck pigs about how they were being deprived of so much money by the wheat board. Trouble is the got brainwashed by Cargill and ADM. HaHa.
 
MHz
#3
Just for a change how about we export it from BC rather than shipping it east. That would also save empty trains traveling west from Ontario.
 
Curious Cdn
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by MHzView Post

Just for a change how about we export it from BC rather than shipping it east. That would also save empty trains traveling west from Ontario.

Most of it probably goes in that direction, anyway. Who gets Western wheat, these days? China? India? Russia? It doesn't end up in our bread. We grow our own grains, have done so for a century and a half plus.
 
MHz
#5
I was recalling in the past that wheat was the only export the Prairies were allowed and it had to go east so I imagine they made a quick buck acting as the middle man.
 
Curious Cdn
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by MHzView Post

I was recalling in the past that wheat was the only export the Prairies were allowed and it had to go east so I imagine they made a quick buck acting as the middle man.

Probably some foreign middle men made the money. That is the Canadian Way, after all.
 
MHz
#7
I would certainly support the Prairies diversify by growing hemp and shipping that east for processing into finished products rather than the Prairies takeing on that aspect as well.

Quote: Originally Posted by Curious CdnView Post

Probably some foreign middle men made the money. That is the Canadian Way, after all.

How did the UK get involved??
 
Curious Cdn
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by MHzView Post

I would certainly support the Prairies diversify by growing hemp and shipping that east for processing into finished products rather than the Prairies takeing on that aspect as well.


How did the UK get involved??

You should send the hemp over the hump to Lotus Land where they have serious expertise with the stuff.
 
MHz
#9
So Vancouver then and we could keep it a local affair. Bales 16ft long would not be out of the question and Monsanto wouldn't even have to get involved.
 
Curious Cdn
+1
#10  Top Rated Post
Quote: Originally Posted by MHzView Post

So Vancouver then and we could keep it a local affair. Bales 16ft long would not be out of the question and Monsanto wouldn't even have to get involved.

Monsanto will develop a "Round-up Ready" hemp, drive any little farmer that doesn't use it off of his land and will end up owning your hemp crop.
 
MHz
+1
#11
. . . and the land and the soul of the farmer and his family.
Since hemp is a weed their tinkering could be eliminated in a few generations. That same tinkering may explain why medical pot doesn't produce any seeds.
 
Scooby
#12
There was a farmer in a village. He was very ambitious. He wanted to make more and more money. In the spring time, when it was rainy, he called out to God, "If it were sunny, I would sow some wheat." The next day, it became sunny, and the farmer sowed some wheat.

After that, he called out to God, "If it were rainy, it would be useful for my wheat." The following day, it rained.

The farmer called out to God, "If you gave more rain, my wheat would grow more." The following day, it rained again.

Then, in summer time, he harvested his wheat and collected it in a heap. The farmer called out to God, "If you had given more rain, my wheat harvest would have been bigger."

He asked God, "Why didn't you give me more rain and more wheat?" Then God made heavy rain, and all of the farmer's wheat floated away with the water.


Farmers have a sense of entitlement, why, I haven't a clue.
 
Curious Cdn
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by MHzView Post

. . . and the land and the soul of the farmer and his family.
Since hemp is a weed their tinkering could be eliminated in a few generations. That same tinkering may explain why medical pot doesn't produce any seeds.

Once they've crossed Cannibis Sativa with Yeti genes and created a true Monster Weed, there will be no turning back.
 
MHz
#14
I'm still waiting for that bale of Nigerian Thunder Fuk weed to show up. Good deal, the guy had a bumper crop so I only had to pay the shipping, Should be here any day now . . .
 
Curious Cdn
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by MHzView Post

I'm still waiting for that bale of Nigerian Thunder Fuk weed to show up. Good deal, the guy had a bumper crop so I only had to pay the shipping, Should be here any day now . . .

How much did you send him?

Was there a bank transfer?
 
MHz
#16
$10k in small bills under $100, apparently they have no banks there, right away I felt sorry for him and his 11teen kids. I'm sure the delay is die to the X-mas rush he said he was experiencing. Any day now, . . .
 
Curious Cdn
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by MHzView Post

$10k in small bills under $100, apparently they have no banks there, right away I felt sorry for him and his 11teen kids. I'm sure the delay is die to the X-mas rush he said he was experiencing. Any day now, . . .

Inshallah.
 
darkbeaver
#18
God Bless them , the Canadian wheat board built this country.

Quote: Originally Posted by ScoobyView Post

There was a farmer in a village. He was very ambitious. He wanted to make more and more money. In the spring time, when it was rainy, he called out to God, "If it were sunny, I would sow some wheat." The next day, it became sunny, and the farmer sowed some wheat.

After that, he called out to God, "If it were rainy, it would be useful for my wheat." The following day, it rained.

The farmer called out to God, "If you gave more rain, my wheat would grow more." The following day, it rained again.

Then, in summer time, he harvested his wheat and collected it in a heap. The farmer called out to God, "If you had given more rain, my wheat harvest would have been bigger."

He asked God, "Why didn't you give me more rain and more wheat?" Then God made heavy rain, and all of the farmer's wheat floated away with the water.


Farmers have a sense of entitlement, why, I haven't a clue.

Climate regulation, google it
 
MHz
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by Curious CdnView Post

Inshallah.

No, his name was Ivan Sonofavitch, odd name for a Nigerian yes?
 
damngrumpy
#20
There were many who never wanted the Wheat Board gone and I think it will be
difficult to raise it from the dead
 
tay
#21
The closure of the Port of Churchill and the fate of Manitoba’s northern rail line is not an accident due to economic circumstance: it was the inevitable result of eliminating the single-desk monopoly of the Canadian Wheat Board.

There were ample warnings raised about what would happen if the Conservative government of Stephen Harper scrapped the wheat board. The threats to the northern rail line and the port were clear, and it wasn’t just farmers and politicians raising red flags. The Winnipeg Chamber of Commerce had concerns about the economic effect on Winnipeg — losses of more than 2,000 jobs.

There will be arguments the rail line and the port are failing because they were not economically viable. In fact, it is cheaper for farmers in the eastern Prairies who want to ship their grain to do so through Churchill. Grain companies ship through their own terminals in Vancouver and Thunder Bay, Ont., where they can make more money — and farmers make less.

The power relationship among producers, rail and grain companies is the same as it ever was, as is the basic geography. There are two major railways, four global grain companies and thousands of farmers. The reason for the wheat board’s creation in the first place was so farmers could pool their bargaining power, and especially so that smaller players could compete on a global marketplace.
The board was a single entity looking out for farmers’ interests, and it had the power to do so in three basic ways.

First, it encouraged farmers to deliver a premium product, which established a global reputation of quality for Canada’s wheat, meaning customers would pay a higher price. Second, it played a role in co-ordination and logistics, getting grain to port by rail.

Finally, because it was a single desk representing all western Canadian farmers, it had the clout to overcome the bottlenecks individual farmers would face with railways and grain companies.

From 2007 to 2010, farmers earned from 90 per cent to 93 per cent of the world price at port. After the wheat board lost its single-desk power, producers’ share of the world price dropped.

Farmers in Manitoba’s Swan River Valley alone lost an estimated $50 million for the 2013-14 crop year.

Despite record high prices, railways were leaving a bumper crop sitting on the Prairies; even fines of $100,000 a day levied by the Conservative government couldn’t persuade them to shift it.

To whom are farmers losing? For the most part, grain companies. The international grain market itself is different than most others: there are only four companies, mostly private and family-owned.

The loss of the wheat board appears to have been a multibillion-dollar transfer of income and wealth by the Conservative government to grain companies, and, to a smaller degree, railway shareholders. The losers are farmers and rural communities, and taxpayers, who have to now have to make up losses.

Grain farmers never voted to get rid of the wheat board single desk. There were issues in the 1990s, when people chafed under inflexible rules, which resulted in reforms. It’s a myth anyone was ever arrested for selling wheat. Some farmers were jailed for taking their trucks out of customs impound. Try driving a seized vehicle from customs at the border today and see what happens.

Throughout their 10 years in power, the Conservatives tried to get rid of the board by putting their thumb on the scale, especially in wheat board elections. A review of the wheat board included the provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan, and excluded Manitoba. Board members who favoured the single desk were gagged by government; there were efforts to strip small farmers off the voters’ list; multiple ballots were sent out so some farmers could vote more than once; a referendum was held with three muddy options, and unlimited third-party spending was allowed.

Despite all this, farmers voted consistently to keep the wheat board until the Conservatives scrapped it after winning a majority in 2011. It was sold — perhaps given away; it’s not clear — to agrifood company Bunge Ltd. and Saudi Arabia in 2015.

The trouble for the Port of Churchill and the northern rail line, stalled grain shipments and billions in lost revenue for farmers are all clearly predicted results of scrapping the single desk. It is a crisis caused by government policy. It should go without saying it can be resolved by changing government policy. The question is how bad things have to get to generate a critical mass to create a consensus for change.

Loss of Canadian Wheat Board behind Churchill failure - Winnipeg Free Press (external - login to view)
 
petros
+1
#22
No shortage of inaccuracies in that article. The amount of grain capable of being shipped through Churchill is limited to aluminum grain cars available. Grain can't be shipped on that line with steel hopper cars. The line cant handle the weight.
 
Machjo
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by tayView Post

Alliance says cutting of marketing system led to $6.5B loss in 2 years
More than 50 farmers from the Swan River and Pelly areas of Manitoba and Saskatchewan met February 10, 2016 and unanimously passed a resolution calling for the re-establishment of the Canadian Wheat Board (CWB), and single-desk selling of grain in western Canada.
Kyle Korneychuk, spokesperson for the Canadian Wheat Board Alliance, an independent and non-partisan prairie-wide farm group noted: “The fact a farm meeting of this size could unanimously pass this resolution is a strong indication to Ottawa that farmers are now feeling the loss of the CWB in their pocketbooks.”
Korneychuk thanked the Manitoba Minister of Agriculture Ron Kostyshyn and elected Rural Municipal (RM) Councillors from both provinces for their support at the meeting. “Farmers respect those who consistently support them as this Minister has demonstrated.”
Responding to a study by Dr. Richard Gray of the University of Saskatchewan showing farmers lost about 6.5 billion dollars in the past two years; Agriculture Minister Kostyshyn said he is “very concerned about the financial situation of farmers since the loss of the CWB.” The Minister also expressed concern about the future of the rail line to the Swan River valley as well as the rail line to Churchill. RM Councillors expressed concerns about the recent...

Quote has been trimmed, See full post: View Post
If they're earning less, is it because consumers are paying less? If so, why would we consumers want the board to be re-established?
 
petros
#24
Consumers aren't paying less.
 
darkbeaver
#25
Wheat is for the rabble, you only eat that if you're lower casste
 
Machjo
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by petrosView Post

Consumers aren't paying less.

So if they're earning less and we're not paying less, then where did the extra money go?
 
petros
#27
Quote: Originally Posted by darkbeaverView Post

Wheat is for the rabble, you only eat that if you're lower casste

You are thinking rye.
 
darkbeaver
#28
Quote: Originally Posted by petrosView Post

You are thinking rye.

i DON'T SUPPOSE YOU KNOW MUCH ABOUT THINKING.

W heat is crap they feed the poor animals they eat
 
petros
#29
I think you have a bad case of ergotism.
 
darkbeaver
#30
Quote: Originally Posted by petrosView Post

I think you have a bad case of ergotism.

And you sell a potion.
 

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