Street racer deported


View Poll Results: Is deportation of killer street racers a fair punishment?
No, it's too harsh 1 12.50%
It is fair and there should be jail time as well. 7 87.50%
Voters: 8. You may not vote on this poll

#juan
#1
Young man deported after killing woman with car.

http://tinyurl.com/8gpf6
 
no1important
#2
Well I am more suprised the government actually went through with this than anything. Him and his cohort never got any jail time for this. He did kill a women and was only remorseful and apologetic just before he got on plane for India, so I can not feel too sorry for him.

He should of showed remorse at trial and said how sorry he was then. But he did not. It may of helped him. Saying it when you are minutes from being deported does not cut it.
 
missile
#3
Most trial lawyers coach their clients on showing remorse for their actions. Therefore,it is meaningless in most cases.
 
bevvyd
#4
They should never have been allowed to serve their sentence at home. They should have been deported immediately.

And I truly hope this is a prescedent setting case as some people have no respect for the law of the country that so graceiously allowed them in.

Personally I feel Canada is better off not to have someone like Mr. Bahlru as a citizen. India deserves him back.
 
Twila
#5
Quote:

Well I am more suprised the government actually went through with this than anything.

I hoped he'd be deported but I also didn't believe the gov't would go through with their threat.

What a treat to learn they did!
 
#juan
#6
There are about three more "street racing" killers still to be dealt with. I think deportation is a reasonable option if the person is over twenty one. It sends a strong message to those young people from overseas who are living here unsupervised, that street racing is unacceptable behavior.
 
Nascar_James
#7
He should have served prison time and then deported.
 
Vanni Fucci
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by Nascar_James

He should have served prison time and then deported.

I would have thought you'd have opted for lethal injection Nero...
 
Andem
#9
Why should he have served his sentence here? I think it was smart to get rid of him before he caused our country anymore grief, including the cost of putting him up in prison for a few years/months/however long the sentence would have been.

Just my thoughts.
 
Hard-Luck Henry
#10
It may be smart, andem, but i'm not sure that makes it right. It could be argued that Canada made him a criminal, so why should India suffer the consequences?
 
#juan
#11
Bahadur Singh Bhalru and his cohort were given two year less a day conditional sentences; to be served at home. These two were not children. If daddy can buy him a Porche, daddy can find him a job in India.
 
#juan
#12
Hard-Luck Henry

Quote:

It could be argued that Canada made him a criminal, so why should India suffer the consequences?

Daddy buying him fast cars and neglecting his up-bringing put him in this predicament. Canada can't be blamed for poor parenting.

[/quote]
 
Hard-Luck Henry
#13
Fair enough, Juan; I know nothing of this individual case, I'm just a little uneasy at the way deportation as punishment is becoming more widespread. I've heard of cases of people being deported as adults, for quite petty crimes, to countries they left as young children. Often they don't even speak the language, and have no means, nevermind a rich Daddy. That does seem harsh. (Things may not have gone that far in Canada yet, these were cases from the U.S., but it's something to watch out for, in my view).
 
#juan
#14
Hard-Luck Henry

There is a case that should be coming up soon involving a 17 year old(17 years old at the time of the offense) who was living in a house in Kerridale with two younger sisters. His parents were still living in Hong Kong. He killed two people in a "street race". Seems to me this is a parent problem. The victim's families are calling for deportation. What do you think?
 
Hard-Luck Henry
#15
I have no sympathy with people who kill in circumstances like those, and the punishments meted out by the courts are generally not strong enough, given the effect these people have had on others lives. The issue I'm trying to raise - and, again, I'm not talking about the individual case you've cited - is that this could lead to a two-tier system of punishment: If a Canadian-born person commits a crime, they go to prison for a year, maybe get some rehab, whatever. An immigrant committing the same crime may find him/herself kicked off a plane anywhere in the world, and left to fend for themselves.

As I said, I have no sympathy for people who's selfish actions devastate the lives of others, and often the punishment doesn't fit the crime. Make the punishment a strong one, make people pay for the consequences of their actions, but make it consistent.
 
Twila
#16
Quote:

is that this could lead to a two-tier system of punishment: If a Canadian-born person commits a crime,

We already have a 2 tier system here. Not based on race but based on financial resources. It's never been about the punishment fitting the crime but who's lawyer has lunch with who's lawyer. and which Judge feels what about what case.

I can't see how justice would be served in a black and white context. It's best dealt with by the specifics of an individual case rather then by the "crime"

We have criminals who commit murder here and run back to their own country and criminals who commit crimes here and want to stay when threatened with deportation.
 
Reverend Blair
#17
Just out of curiousity, how many people here have raced cars on the street, or been in a car that was racing? How many have done something equally reckless in a car?

I won't speak for the rest of you, but for everybody I know, this guy could be us. Does not having killed anybody put us at a different level?
 
GL Schmitt
#18
Bhalru’s mother is correct, he is being given a life sentence - a life-outside-of-Canada sentence - but she is wrong to characterise the cause as an accident. At best, it was reckless disregard. In such a case it may be permissible for Canada to rid itself of an undesirable alien.

My question is how can this penalty be applied fairly?

Unless native-born Canadians never race, or when they do, never collide, these naturalized Canadians will receive a penalty that native-born Canadians cannot be given.

In light of that, I wonder how this sentence would stand up under a Charter of Rights appeal?
 
Nascar_James
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by Vanni Fucci

Quote: Originally Posted by Nascar_James

He should have served prison time and then deported.

I would have thought you'd have opted for lethal injection Nero...

lethal injection? hah! That would be too easy. I was thinking ... er ... more the guillotine type!
 
Reverend Blair
#20
Ever been a race there, Nascar Nero? Or were you not man enough?
 
Nascar_James
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by Reverend Blair

Ever been a race there, Nascar Nero? Or were you not man enough?

I've always owned Diesel pick-up trucks so never really had the chance to drag race, Rev except when there was snow. May seem unusual right? Not so. While living in Canada, in the wintertime I would er ... occasionally race sports cars soon as the light turned green. Needless to say, their high performance sports cars were clearly outclassed by my super-duty V-8 powerstroke Ford pickup with 4WD engaged.

hey-wait-minute ... aren't you supposed to be at the bar with Vanni now?!?!
 
Hard-Luck Henry
#22
[quote="Reverend Blair"]Just out of curiousity, how many people here have raced cars on the street, or been in a car that was racing? How many have done something equally reckless in a car?
quote]

I can honestly say I haven't, Rev. I'm talking about British road conditions, here, maybe it's different in your wide open spaces, but it's obvious to me, that if you drive at high speeds on public roads, then you're not totally in control of events - someone may be coming the other way, oil on the road, opposite camber, maybe you're not as good as you thought you were, around a blind bend, people crossing the road, whatever. People know this is a realistic possibility, and if they go ahead and drive recklessly anyway, then that's not an accident, it's not unlucky, it's a direct consequence of their deliberate actions, GL Schmitt's "reckless disregard".

(*apologies for sudden changes in tense, I'm a bit pished )
 
no1important
#23
Quote:

In light of that, I wonder how this sentence would stand up under a Charter of Rights appeal?

I know he appealed the deportation many times and had the last appeal the day before he left. He fought for five years and none decided with him. The Federal Judge said he can't stay and I highly doubt the SCOC would of entertained this case.

He was not a citizen and he violated his conditions for being allowed here. He did kill a women and showed no remorse until he was just about to get on plane.

People get deported regularily for committing crimes, its just this case has been in the media more than most.

He is lucky not to be stuck in the "picking up soap" position in the big house, as he surely would of been.
 

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