Statues of Queen and Prince Philip unveiled at Canterbury Cathedral


Blackleaf
#1
Two statues of the Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh were unveiled at Canterbury Cathedral today - the first royal sculptures to be installed there during her reign.

The monarch arrived at Capel-le-Ferne in Kent this afternoon to open a new 3.5million visitor centre that honours the Battle of Britain war heroes.

She then made her way to the cathedral with husband Prince Philip to reveal the figures, which have been created to mark her Diamond Jubilee.

They were were carved by sculptor Nina Bilbey, 47, from Wells-next-the-Sea, Norfolk.

His and hers statues of the Queen and Prince Philip unveiled at Canterbury Cathedral - but are they a good likeness?


The Queen arrived at Capel-Le-Ferne to open new 3.5million visitor centre
She also met with last surviving Battle of Britain pilots of Churchill's 'few'

Accompanied by Prince Philip she will unveil two new sculptures today

It is the first royal sculptures to be installed at Cathedral during her reign

By Gemma Mullin for MailOnline
26 March 2015
Daily Mail

Two statues of the Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh were unveiled at Canterbury Cathedral today - the first royal sculptures to be installed there during her reign.

The monarch arrived at Capel-le-Ferne in Kent this afternoon to open a new 3.5million visitor centre that honours the Battle of Britain war heroes.

She then made her way to the cathedral with husband Prince Philip to reveal the figures, which have been created to mark her Diamond Jubilee.


The statues of the Queen (left) and the Duke of Edinburgh (right) were unveiled at Canterbury Cathedral today


The statues were carved by sculptor Nina Bilbey, 47, from Wells-next-the-Sea, Norfolk, and will stand by the west door in the Kent cathedral.

The Dean of Canterbury, the Very Revd Dr Robert Willis, said: 'The new royal statues will be a splendid addition to the cathedral and they will be a sign of the high respect and affection that everyone at Canterbury has for the Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh.'

She earlier opened visitor and education centre, The Wing, which offers an interactive experience of the story of the Battle of Britain.


The statues were carved by sculptor Nina Bilbey, 47, from Wells-next-the-Sea, Norfolk, to mark the Queen's Diamond Jubilee


They are the first royal sculptures to be installed at the Kent Cathedral during her reign and it is her first visit to Canterbury in 13 years today

The Queen opened visitor and education centre, The Wing, which offers an interactive experience of the story of the Battle of Britain

She has followed in the footsteps of her mother, the Queen Mother, who unveiled the memorial at Capel-le-Ferne, near Folkestone, on July 9, 1993.

A flypast of a Hurricane, Spitfire and Typhoon took place over the English Channel where RAF pilots defied Germany's Luftwaffe more than 70 years ago.

More than 500 of the 3,000 or so men of RAF Fighter Command died in the Battle of Britain between July and October 1940. Of the remainder, a further 814 died before the end of the war.

As the battle, the last to be fought in Britain, raged in August 1940, Churchill uttered his famous words in a speech to Parliament: 'Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few.'

SHE WAS TASKED WITH SCULPTING THE QUEEN BUT WHO IS NINA BILBEY?


Nina Bilbey, who was commissioned to carve the royal statues, stands proudly with the finished figures


Nina Bilbey, 47, is a sculptor and senior carving tutor at The City and Guilds Art School in London.

She gained a B.A. Hons in Sculpture at St Martins School of Art (which features in the Pulp song "Common People") before gaining a post graduate certificate in education from the University of Leeds. She has since done a diploma in stone masonry.

Since 2000 Nina has specialised in stone carving and has been commissioned for several statues including ones for Hampton Court flower show.

She has also carved Gargoyles for St. Pancras Station and Saint Georges Chapel Windsor, and projects for The Houses of Parliament, The Royal Pavilion Brighton and Hereford Cathedral.

The founder member of 'The London Carving Co-Op', Nina has spent six months working on the Royal Barge and has just finished a major carving commission for a Private house in Cheshire.

She blogged about the royal commission on her website as she went along, showing the original sketches, the cast coloured in bronze powder and a half sized model version.

Explaining how she made the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh statues, she said that it was very 'difficult getting the likeness and modelling tiny chains'. She said she spoke to Lady Hussey, one of the Queen's Lady in Waiting, who provided photographs and advised on how to do the hair.

Pictures of the original designs were sent to the palace, which decided that the Prince should hold his robes, rather than gloves as she had planned.


Read more: Queen and Prince Philip statues unveiled at Canterbury Cathedral | Daily Mail Online
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Last edited by Blackleaf; Mar 26th, 2015 at 02:40 PM..
 
EagleSmack
#2
Lawn ornaments.
 
Spade
#3
Paint them pink and place them next to the flamingos. They are too big for gnomes.

The Queen looks more like the sculptress than her portrait on the loonie.
 
EagleSmack
#4
Great idea Spade
 
Ludlow
+2
#5  Top Rated Post
I'll tell ye when I hit the lottery the first place I'm a goin is to see those two statues.
 
Spade
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by LudlowView Post

I'll tell ye when I hit the lottery the first place I'm a goin is to see those two statues.

Yep, they'll be quite the tourist draw.

Just like Lot's wife.

 
EagleSmack
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by LudlowView Post

I'll tell ye when I hit the lottery the first place I'm a goin is to see those two statues.

Works of art aren't they? lol

A couple of hobbits.
 
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