Yazidi refugees: ‘Can you take me to Canada?’


Praxius
#1

A displaced Iraqi child from the Yazidi community rests after crossing the Syrian-Iraqi border in northern Iraq on Wednesday. At least 20,000 civilians who had been besieged by jihadists on a mountain in northern Iraq have safely escaped to Syria and been escorted by Kurdish forces back into Iraq, officials said.

Yazidi refugees desperate to reach safety: ‘Can you take me to Canada?’ | Toronto Star

IRBIL, IRAQ—A week and a half into the siege of Sinjar, the Yazidis who have escaped their mountain prison are thin and weak, scorched by the sun and visibly, horrendously traumatized.

A lucky few have reached Lalish, the mountain shrine tucked into a leafy valley near the town of Sheikhan, about 40 kilometres south of Dohuk.

When airstrikes began last week, those trapped on the mountain were offered a window, however small and dangerous, to slip their captors.

Oubaid Khalaf, 44, described climbing down the mountain as far as he dared to wait out the airstrikes targeting Islamic State militants gathered in the valley below.

Once the firing ceased, he and a group of others hiked down the foothills and walked west for three hours, to Syria and the waiting arms of Kurdish PKK fighters, who escorted them around the Islamic State-held area and back into Iraq.

Just hours after arriving at Lalish, Khalaf is grieving for those he left on the mountain, resting his wounded feet and trying to rehydrate. “I can’t look ahead,” he said, and his eyes filled with tears.

But next to him, a father of four named Khaled was ready to think about the future.

“Can you take me to Canada?” he asked. “My sister lives in Toronto and I speak English. Can you help?”

For Khaled, as for so many of Iraq’s displaced minorities, that help may prove difficult to obtain. Canada’s immigration laws don’t allow an adult sibling to sponsor another adult sibling, and Khaled is not technically a refugee.

But slumped on a thin, donated mattress, surrounded by his haunted-looking children and a 22-year-old cousin with tear-stained cheeks and a concave stomach, Khaled was desperate to get somewhere — anywhere — safe.

With more and more signs suggesting an imminent international rescue operation of the last Yazidis on Mount Sinjar, the international NGOs here in northern Iraq are focused on the immediate need: how to feed, shelter and care for the up to 30,000 people who may still be alive. If and when they are rescued, they will join tens of thousands of Yazidis understandably desperate to leave Iraq.

“The only solution for Christians and Yazidis is to take us outside the country. The U.S., Europe, anywhere,” said a Yazidi father who goes by Abu Ahmad. “I don’t see any future for us here.”

As the siege has drawn out, the number of families staggering into Lalish has dwindled.

“Between 20 and 30 families arrived in the last 24 hours,” said Luqman Sulaiman, who works at the shrine. He paused to consider his next words. “They’ll live.”

Iraq’s Yazidis aren’t the only displaced minorities asking for another life in the West, but their recent ordeal may make it easier to muster support for a life-changing relocation plan.

“In my opinion, they should be given refugee status anywhere. They deserve it on virtue of who they are,” said Joe Stark, deputy director of Human Rights Watch’s Middle East and North Africa division. “They shouldn’t have to prove a well-founded fear of persecution — it’s self-evident.”
 
gopher
+2
#2  Top Rated Post
The government hasn't exiled them so how can they be considered refugees (legally speaking)?

Can't speak for Canada, but If the borders are opened in the USA because people are fleeing from war the floodgates will never be closed.
 
Praxius
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by gopherView Post

The government hasn't exiled them so how can they be considered refugees (legally speaking)?

Can't speak for Canada, but If the borders are opened in the USA because people are fleeing from war the floodgates will never be closed.

The "Occupying" force (ISIS) that has control over their homes/lands aren't exactly exiling them.... they're killing them and using their heads as decorations.
 
gopher
+2
#4
So where is their government to help them? It has gotten over a trillion dollars and support from thousands of US troops. Isn't it time for them to do their own fighting??
 
gore0bsessed
#5
they got steamrolled
 
B00Mer
#6
Are they Muslim?? NO!! Tak'em all.
 
captain morgan
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by PraxiusView Post

The "Occupying" force (ISIS) that has control over their homes/lands aren't exactly exiling them.... they're killing them and using their heads as decorations.

Wouldn't Australia have a more compatible climate?... It's much closer too
 
petros
#8
Why isn't Isael taking in their Christian brothes? There is no need for airlifts when we have such a staunch Christian supportive nation that close.
 
captain morgan
#9
The core question is why they need to flee their historic homeland in the first place.

One might also ask where Iran, Syria, Eqypt, Jordan, UAE, etc, etc are in aiding the brethren as opposed to shipping them half way around the world to a place where they have no roots whatsoever.
 
MHz
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by B00MerView Post

Are they Muslim?? NO!! Tak'em all.

OPEC gets billed $150/day /child. All others cost $150/day. You are always picking the slow horse.
 
Praxius
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morganView Post

The core question is why they need to flee their historic homeland in the first place.

Have you not been following the news recently? They have to flee their historic homeland because they're being killed off by the ISIS.... and the only thing being done about it is getting some food and water dropped off to them while they slowly die on a mountain.

Quote:

One might also ask where Iran, Syria, Eqypt, Jordan, UAE, etc, etc are in aiding the brethren as opposed to shipping them half way around the world to a place where they have no roots whatsoever.

All of our ancestors who migrated to Canada had no roots in Canada whatsoever.... gotta start somewhere.

Syria is a little busy trying to fight the ISIS last I heard.... Egypt is busy with their own crap while also trying to deal with the crap from Gaza/Israel. The entire ME is pretty much in a mess..... a mess the West played a large role in creating in the first place.

Australia is sending aid/supplies and is joining with the US with possible plans to sending troops to try and stop the genocide.

It is suspected that there could be up to 30,000 people still alive, though not for long.

This isn't just a case of some boat people being illegally smuggled into the country asking for asylum on our shores, circumventing the proper processing that other people go through normally to be brought in.... this isn't some case of $30 a month to some African village to feed and school some kid who will just give birth to more kids who demand a handout like their parents had.

This is a clear genocide and brutal oppression by the ISIS of innocent civilians, men, women and children alike simply based on their personal religious beliefs.

And people like you want to bicker and moan about who's going to take them and finger point at other nations to do it?

If ten nations around the world took in 10% of those remaining 30,000 surviving civilians, that's 3,000 people each nation has to deal with.... spread them out, give them jobs. I'm sure they'd dig ditches and work at McDonalds if it mean their heads wouldn't end up as hood ornaments on these Extremist's cars.

Why should these people have to suffer and die because of the inaction of others?

What did these specific people do to you or do to our nations?

Is it simply because they're different from you?

I guess none of this really matters since they're not like us master race folk.

Get them all out of there and then it's as simple and easy as carpet bombing all these ISIS goons, then storming in and giving these ISIS freaks a taste of their own medicine and wipe them out.
 
Johnnny
#12
ISIS is getting pushed back heavy... On my way to Dohuk we crossed an intersection that was 45km from Mosul... Now that Oboma is dropping heavy freedom bombs, the Peshmerga have grown some balls and now things have changed. Honestly ive been roaming around the Shawqlawa area between Erbil and Sulymaniyah and life has been going on as usual. The news channels are over exaggerating whats going on. I mentioned earlier that they were ready in Erbil for ISIS and that life was going on as usual... Life is still going on as usual.
 
BaalsTears
#13
ISIS will simply change tactics from coventional to insurgent, and the war will go on and on.
 
petros
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by JohnnnyView Post

Life is still going on as usual.

With Blackwater covering your as$:and $1800 a day everything is copacetic?

Have fun while you're young.
 
Blackleaf
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by petrosView Post

Why isn't Isael taking in their Christian brothes? There is no need for airlifts when we have such a staunch Christian supportive nation that close.


I've got a feeling that these Yazidis and Christians are of the "wrong" religion.

Had they been Muslims you would have been desperate for Canada to open the floodgates to them, but as they are Yazidis and Christians you'd rather they stayed there to be brutally butchered. Lots of people must be thanking God you aren't in power.

Meanwhile, the British people ARE showing compassion towards those poor Christians and Yazidis.

A new YouGov survey for The Sun finds that 54% of British people approve of President Obama’s authorisation of American air strikes against IS in Iraq to prevent the killing of religious minorities. Just 20% disapprove and 26% are unsure.

Last summer, British people opposed the US carrying out missile attacks against Syria by 47-25% when Syrians were being killed by Assad's forces.

However the public are almost evenly divided over whether the RAF should take part in air strikes against IS to aid the area's Christians and Yazidis. 37% approve, 36% disapprove.

So far Britain has only agreed to drop humanitarian aid, in the mountainous area where fleeing Yazidis are trapped. By 74-12% British people approve of deploying the RAF to assist with this effort.


Public approval of U.S. air strikes in Iraq, division over British involvement

by Will Dahlgreen in Foreign affairs, Front Page and Politics

Tue August 12, 2014


54% of British people approve of US air strikes against Islamic State militants in Iraq – but they are divided over British involvement in any military effort

President Obama has authorised (external - login to view) targeted air strikes in Iraq against Islamic State (IS) militants, formerly known as ISIS. The president said the US would act “carefully and responsibly to prevent an act of genocide”, referring to the massacre of Yazidis, Christians and other religious minorities by IS for their faith. Iraq’s human rights minister accused the group (external - login to view) of killing at least 500 Yazidis – an ancient religious group (external - login to view) who combine Zoroastrianism, Christianity and Islam – and burying some alive.
The casualties have led to international outcry, and British MPs have called on David Cameron to recall parliament (external - login to view) to debate the appropriate response.

A new YouGov survey for The Sun finds that 54% of British people approve of President Obama’s authorisation of American air strikes against IS in Iraq to prevent the killing of religious minorities. 20% disapprove and 26% are unsure.

Last summer, British people opposed the US carrying out missile attacks against Syria by 47-25%.

So far Britain has only agreed to drop humanitarian aid (external - login to view), in the mountainous area where fleeing Yazidis are trapped. By 74-12% British people approve of deploying the RAF to assist with this effort.

However the public are almost evenly divided over whether the RAF should take part in air strikes against IS. 37% approve, 36% disapprove. This is much closer than public sentiment over last years calls for British strikes against Syrian military targets, where a clear majority disapproved.

Lord Dannatt, who is leading the call to reconvene parliament, said the UK has “some culpability” for the breakdown of Iraq. YouGov’s survey finds that the decision to send troops into Iraq to overthrow Saddam Hussein attracts the most criticism compared to other recent British military interventions. 50% say it worsened the situation, compared to 38% for intervening in Afghanistan, 32% for supporting rebels in Libya and 17% for not intervening militarily in Syria – perhaps explaining the relatively high support for re-engaging in Iraq.

Public approval of U.S. air strikes in Iraq, division over British involvement
 
Tecumsehsbones
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by BlackleafView Post

Meanwhile, the British people ARE showing compassion towards those poor Christians and Yazidis.

A new YouGov survey for The Sun finds that 54% of British people approve of President Obama’s authorisation of American air strikes against IS in Iraq to prevent the killing of religious minorities.

Compassionate airstrikes. We need to start using that.

"When you care enough to send the very best. The Mk-82 hi-drag."

Quote:

However the public are almost evenly divided over whether the RAF should take part in air strikes against IS to aid the area's Christians and Yazidis. 37% approve, 36% disapprove.



Leading from behind. Great Briddish tradition.

Quote: Originally Posted by captain morganView Post

The core question is why they need to flee their historic homeland in the first place.

One might also ask where Iran, Syria, Eqypt, Jordan, UAE, etc, etc are in aiding the brethren as opposed to shipping them half way around the world to a place where they have no roots whatsoever.

Maybe they'll pay to ship them to the Americas, where they can slaughter the people and take over. Like the Europeans did.
 

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