The Commonwealth marks centenary of entry into WWI


Blackleaf
#1
Just the day after the 2014 Glasgow Commonwealth Games have finished, the Commonwealth family has come together again in the same city to mark the 100th anniversary of Britain's entry into WWI, exactly a week after the conflict started.

1,100 people, including Commonwealth royals, politicians and dignitaries attended the service this morning at Glasgow Cathedral.

The service featured poems, prayers and readings, reflecting the contribution of those from around the Commonwealth.

Prince Charles's arrival was heralded by a fanfare by trumpeters from the Band of Her Majesty's Royal Marines Scotland.

Charles, who is known as the Duke of Rothesay in Scotland, was wearing the Royal Navy Ceremonial Day Dress with medals. He is Admiral of the Fleet of the Royal Navy.

Opening the service, Reverend Laurence Whitley, Minister of Glasgow Cathedral, said: 'We meet because on a summer's day like this one, one hundred years ago, the world changed. Our nations and peoples found themselves in a war the like of which had never before been seen and the memory of which still haunts us all.'


In London at 10pm - an hour before war was officially declared 100 years ago - a televised service of solemn commemoration will be held at Westminster Abbey.

Key figures there will include the Duchess of Cornwall, Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg, Labour leader Ed Miliband and Metropolitan Police commander Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe.

The service will include the gradual extinguishing of candles, with an oil lamp extinguished at the tomb of the unknown soldier at 11pm - the exact hour war was declared.

In the same hour, the nation has been urged to switch off lights in places of worship, public buildings, workplaces and homes, and leave one light burning as a symbol of hope in darkness.


Among the buildings taking part in an hour-long lights switch-off tonight will be the Houses of Parliament, the BBC's Broadcasting House in London, the Eden Project in Cornwall, Blackpool Tower on the Lancashire coast, St Paul's and Durham cathedrals, and Wales Millennium Centre in Cardiff. Also expected to join in are office buildings including Barclays in Canary Wharf and Marks & Spencer.

The centenary commemorations, known officially as Lights Out, are organised by 14-18 Now, a nationwide cultural programme to mark 100 years since the start of the war.




More than 1,100 people including dignitaries from around the Commonwealth have attended a service to mark the centenary of the start of the First World War.

Prime Minister David Cameron, First Minister Alex Salmond and the Prince of Wales were among those at Glasgow Cathedral today to honour the millions who died in the conflict.

The service featured poems, prayers and readings, reflecting the contribution of those from around the Commonwealth.

Prince Charles's arrival was heralded by a fanfare by trumpeters from the Band of Her Majesty's Royal Marines Scotland.

Charles, who is known as the Duke of Rothesay in Scotland, was wearing the Royal Navy Ceremonial Day Dress with medals. He is Admiral of the Fleet of the Royal Navy.

Opening the service, Reverend Laurence Whitley, Minister of Glasgow Cathedral, said: 'We meet because on a summer's day like this one, one hundred years ago, the world changed. Our nations and peoples found themselves in a war the like of which had never before been seen and the memory of which still haunts us all.'

Others at the service included Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg, Labour leader Ed Miliband, Scottish Labour leader Johann Lamont, Scottish Conservative leader Ruth Davidson and Scottish Liberal Democrat leader Willie Rennie.

The Prince of Wales, who is known as the Duke of Rothesay north of the border, attended a commemorative service at Glasgow Cathedral today alongside 1,400 guests


Prince Charles represented the Queen at a service at Glasgow Cathedral today where David Cameron read a passage from the Bible to the 1,400-strong congregation


Day of commemorations: Prince Charles, the Prince of Wales arrives at Glasgow Cathedral to attend a memorial service to mark the centenary of the outbreak of the First World War


Labour leader Ed Miliband and his wife Justine arrive at the service along with Scottish First Minister Alex Salmond


Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg arrives at the ceremony


Former ITV News at Ten host Sir Trevor McDonald introduced many of the readings, and reminded the congregation that by the end of the war 6,352,000 men from across the British Isles had seen service, with 791,000 killed and 1,600,000 wounded.

He also paid tribute to the those from around the Commonwealth who fought in the conflict.

Veteran BBC broadcaster Kate Adie also gave a reading, highlighting the role of women in the conflict, while Joanne Thomson, a 2014 graduate of the Royal Conservatoire Scotland, read a passage by the widow of poet Edward Thomas about their last night together before he was killed in the war.

The Prime Minister read a passage on service from St Mark's Gospel, while others chosen for readings included Sir Peter Cosgrove, Governor-General of Australia, Mr Gordon Campbell, High Commissioner for Canada, and Lieutenant General Sir Jerry Mateparae, Governor-General of New Zealand.

The Duke of Rothesay laid a wreath followed by Mr Cameron and Glasgow Lord Provost Sadie Docherty, and Mr Clegg and Mr Miliband also laid wreaths.


Following the memorial, the Duke and Mr Cameron attended a reception at the City Chambers on George Square.

They were introduced to the family of Henry May, from Bridgeton, Glasgow, who was awarded the Victoria Cross for saving the life of a comrade in France in October 1914.

Meanwhile in Kent, Prince Harry wore full military dress for commemorations in Folkestone attended by more than 800 veterans and civilians.

Wearing his No 1 dress Blues and Royals, the fourth in line to the throne laid a wreath in memory of all those who lost their lives in the Great War after unveiling a memorial arch to remember the men and women involved in the First World War.

The monument on The Leas marks the route - walked by the Prince today - millions of soldiers took as they marched to the town's harbour to start their journey to the battlefields of France or Belgium.


Prince Harry wore full military dress to attend a service of commemoration in Folkestone, Kent - he unveiled a memorial arch to remember the fallen

Remembering the dead: Prince Harry watched the military parade through the naval town of Folkestone, Kent

The Queen, who is currently on holiday in Scotland, was due to attend a local service close to Balmoral at Crathie Kirk while her husband, the Duke of Edinburgh, was to attend a similar event at Sandringham Church.

Charles himself has a link with the conflict as his own great uncle Captain Fergus Bowes-Lyon was killed in the Battle of Loos which preceded the Somme campaign.

His wife Camilla's family suffered the loss of three brothers, who would have been her great uncles, in the 1914-18 war including one - Henry Cubbitt - who died at the Somme in 1916.

The Duchess of Cornwall will tonight attend a moving candlelit Vigil of Prayer Service in Westminster Abbey. Prince Andrew is attending a service of commemoration at St Anne's Cathedral in Belfast while the Earl and Countess of Wessex will be at Guildford Cathedral.

Princess Anne is also attending a service of commemoration in the WW1 memorial chapel at Carisbrooke Castle. The Duke and Duchess of Gloucester will be at Llandaff Cathedral in Cardiff.

Today, a national day of commemoration, events marking the anniversary of the start of the Great War were being held in London, Glasgow and Belgium, will begin a four-year Government-led programme of remembrance.

The Prince of Wales and British Prime Minister David Cameron attended a wreath-laying ceremony for the WW1 commemorations in Glasgow Square today

World War Two veteran Sgt Jack Watson, formerly of the Royal Artillery, places a handwritten Remembrance Cross at the new 11-ZERO-1 sculpture depicting a WW1 soldier at Seaham, Co Durham

Emblem: The flower became a symbol of remembrance after growing from the battlefields following the conflict. The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, Prince Harry and Prime Minister David Cameron will attend a ceremony in the nearby Symphorien military cemetery this evening as part of a day of events to commemorate the conflict

At the going down of the sun: The sun sets behind the new Black Watch Memorial in Ypres last night. The memorial honours the 8,960 Black Watch officers and soldiers killed and more than 20,000 who were wounded in the course of the First World One

One hundred years to the day since Britain entered the First World War, the poppies which became such a poignant symbol of the bloodshed still grow from the fields where hundreds of thousands lost their lives.

The sun rose over the battlefields of Belgium and northern France this morning ahead of a day of ceremonies to mark the momentous date in history and remember those killed in the conflict.

At 11pm on August 4, 1914, Britain declared war on Germany, ushering in four years of appalling tragedy.

Before the armistice was signed on November 11, 1918, millions of lives were lost, including more than 750,000 British and Commonwealth soldiers, in what was the bloodiest conflict the world had known.

Never forgotten: Flowers are placed around the 'Grave of the Unknown Warrior' ahead of a candlelight vigil on August 4 at Westminster Abbey today. A candle to be lit there will be blown out as the war started 100 years ago

Mr Cameron, who lost a relative in September 1914, said: 'A hundred years ago today Britain entered the First World War and we are marking that centenary to honour those who served, to remember those who died, and to ensure that the lessons learnt live with us forever.

'It is right to remember the extraordinary sacrifice of a generation and we are all indebted to them because their most enduring legacy is our liberty.

'That’s why we remember it, because of the scale of the slaughter, the way it changed our world.'There was a cause that people rallied to, and I think it’s worth remembering that alongside obviously the appalling loss of life and the effect it had on our communities.

'I think that’s one of the reasons we remember the First World War – because it so profoundly changed our world; changed our world in lots of bad ways, but also in some good ways – the emancipation of women, the fact that women then got the vote, participated more in the workforce, there were changes in medicine, massive improvements in our world.


'All those things are worth remembering and that’s why as a government and as a country, we should be refurbishing our war memorials, which we are; we should be sending children to go and visit First World War battlefields; we should be studying these things properly in our schools'.

At the Tower of London, a striking sea of blood-red ceramic poppies has been installed flowing out of the Tower and into the dry moat – one flower for every life lost.

A sea of red: Work on the 888,246 poppies to be laid out in the dry moat around The Tower of London. The art installation will be officially unveiled tomorrow

Striking: Volunteers have been installing the porcelain poppies at the famous site on a week of remembrance ceremonies both in the UK and Europe

Remembrance: The work, produced by artist Paul Cummins and theatre stage designer Tom Piper, is titled Blood Swept Lands And Seas Of Red, it will eventually include a poppy for every British or colonial military fatality of the war, which Britain entered 100 years ago today

Field of flowers: Volunteers install porcelain poppies as part of the art installation yesterday ahead of a day of ceremonies both in Britain and Europe

Installation: The sea of poppies will grow over the summer and the last poppy will be planted on November 11, marking the end of the First World War

Breathtaking: The Metropolitan Police helicopter captures from above how the sea of red poppies has been spread across the Tower of London's grounds

The work is the idea of artist Paul Cummins and is titled Blood Swept Lands And Seas Of Red. It will eventually include 888,246 poppies, representing all the British or colonial military fatalities in the war.

It will grow over the summer, and the last poppy will be planted on November 11, symbolically marking the end of the First World War.

Each poppy will be available to buy for £25, with proceeds shared among military charities. It is just one of the commemorations taking place across the country.

Attention will turn the services across the channel this evening, with royalty and poltical leaders gathering at the St Symphorien cemetery in Belgium at 6.30pm. Also attending that ceremony will be Iris Hunt, great-niece of Private John Parr, the first of 704,000 British soldiers to die.

How and why he died remains a mystery because when he was fatally shot at the age of 17 on August 21, 1914, it was two whole days before the fighting at the Battle of Mons had even begun.

His mother continued to write him letters for months after his death until she was eventually told of his fate. Mrs Hunt, 75, told the Sunday Times she was attending to 'link a mother with her son'.

In Glasgow, the Prince of Wales will attend a service at the city's cathedral, followed by a wreath-laying service and march-past at the Cenotaph in George Square.

Lord Provost of Glasgow, Councillor Sadie Docherty, said: 'I hope people will be inspired over the coming four years to learn more about their own family and community war history.'

In London at 10pm - an hour before war was officially declared 100 years ago - a service of solemn commemoration will be held at Westminster Abbey.

Key figures there will include the Duchess of Cornwall, Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg, Labour leader Ed Miliband and Metropolitan Police commander Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe.

Mr Clegg said: 'Sixteen million people perished in World War I. It's an almost unimaginable number of people who died in a war which still shapes the world as it is today.'

Mr Miliband said: 'Young men from across Britain served alongside soldiers from across the world - from the Indian sub-continent to Africa, from Australia to the Caribbean.

'We must also remember those who served their country in other ways, from nurses who risked their lives on the Western Front to those who played their part on the Home Front.'

The service will include the gradual extinguishing of candles, with an oil lamp extinguished at the tomb of the unknown soldier at 11pm - the exact hour war was declared.

In the same hour, the nation has been urged to switch off lights in places of worship, public buildings, workplaces and homes, and leave one light burning as a symbol of hope in darkness.

Among the buildings taking part in an hour-long lights switch-off tonight will be the Houses of Parliament, Broadcasting House in London, the Eden Project in Cornwall, St Paul's and Durham cathedrals, and Wales Millennium Centre in Cardiff. Also expected to join in are office buildings including Barclays in Canary Wharf and Marks & Spencer.

The centenary commemorations, known officially as Lights Out, are organised by 14-18 Now, a nationwide cultural programme to mark 100 years since the start of the war.


Buildings around the UK, including Blackpool Tower, will take part in the Lights Out commemoration between 10pm and 11pm tonight

Memorial: One hundred white crosses with names of some of those lost in the Great War stand in the New Zealand Parliament grounds in capital Wellington

Salute: A New Zealand Army bugler plays the last post at the Tomb of the Unknown Warrior during a ceremony to commemorate the centenary of the start of World War One in Wellington








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Last edited by Blackleaf; Aug 4th, 2014 at 08:59 AM..
 
Blackleaf
#2
The London Eye, 10 Downing Street, the Houses of Parliament, Tower Bridge and Blackpool Tower were amongst the great British landmarks which turned off their lights between 10pm and 11pm last night to mark the moment, exactly 100 years ago, in which Britain entered WWI.

It was at 11pm British time (midnight central European time) on 4th August 1914 that Prime Minister Herbert Asquith announced that the then-United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland has declared war on Germany after Germany refused Britain's ultimatum to withdraw from Belgium by midnight central European time.

The Lights Out ceremony was inspired by the words of then-Foreign Secretary Sir Edward Grey who, just before the announcement, looked out of the window and saw the lamps being lit in the Mall below as darkness fell and declared: 'The lamps are going out all over Europe; we shall not see them lit again in our lifetime.'

The public were also urged to turn out all their lights at home at the same time as the Lights Out ceremony and maybe have just one solitary candle flickering.

One light which was not put out last night was the new Spectra beacon. Situated just yards from the House of Lords the beacon will shine into the night sky every night for the next week.

At the same time as the Lights Out ceremony, a ceremony took place in Westminster Abbey, which was shown live on BBC2, which was attended by politicians, dignitaries and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall.

As the ceremony progressed candles, including those held by the guests, were gradually extinguished, plunging the ancient abbey into darkness, with the exception of one solitary candle around the tomb of the Unknown Warrior, which was also eventually extinguished. Rather than poppies surrounding the tomb, the tomb was instead surrounded by flowers which appeared in British gardens 100 years ago, as poppies are only used to mark the end of the Great War, not the start.

Just before these events took place in Britain, a ceremony - again shown live on BBC2 - took place at the St Symphorien cemetery in Mons, Belgium accompanied by, amongst others, Prince Harry, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, Belgium's King Philippe and Queen Mathilde and British Prime Minister David Cameron, who placed lanterns and floral wreaths on a war memorial. Serving British soldiers read moving WWI poems and a choir of children sang hymns as darkness fell. The St Symphorien cemetery is the resting place of both Commonwealth and German soldiers of WWI who are buried alongside each other.

The night the lights went out across Britain: Young royals bow their heads as millions take part in moving tributes to the fallen - exactly a century since WWI was declared


Idea inspired by former foreign secretary Sir Edward Grey's famous words when war was declared 100 years ago

Houses of Parliament, Tower Bridge, St Paul's Cathedral and Buckingham Palace all took part in London

PM David Cameron urged families to join in the 'gesture of remembrance' by leaving on a single light


By Richard Spillett (external - login to view) and Mark Duell (external - login to view)
4 August 2014
Daily Mail

The London Eye, 10 Downing Street and the Houses of Parliament were among Britain's landmarks which turned out their lights for an hour at 10pm last night to remember those who died in the First World War.

Homes, businesses and public buildings across the UK were asked to leave on a single light or candle to commemorate the moment then-prime minister Herbert Asquith declared Britain had entered the First World War at 11pm on August 4, 1914.

Buildings around the country yesterday took part in the 'hour of reflection' between 10pm and 11pm, leaving just a light illuminating a window.


Darkness: Buildings around the country, including Tower Bridge and 10 Downing Street, took part in the 'hour of reflection' between 10pm and 11pm yesterday


In the dark: The Houses of Parliament in London after the lights were turned off as part off the national 'Lights Out' campaign of remembrance to mark the moment Britain entered WWI. Around 1 million Britons died in the conflict, more than in WWII.


The clock face of Big Ben was the only light illuminating Westminster at 11pm last night, which marked the moment the First World War began 100 years ago


Before: A photo of the Houses of Parliament before the lights were turned out to mark 100 years since Britain entered the First World War


London Eye: People across the UK were invited to turn their lights out from 10pm to 11pm leaving on a single light or candle


Before the blackout: The London Eye, on the South Bank in central London, with lights on ahead of the Lights Out event across Britain


A single light illuminated Tower Bridge in London last night as traffic and pedestrians pass over the crossing as the centenary of World War One is marked


The bridge lifts up to allow a boat to pass through prior to the beginning of the Lights Out event where many central London landmarks took part


Landmark building: The Shard in central London is seen with the spire lights switched off (top), and just before (bottom)


Light in the distance: The Cenotaph in central London during an hour's darkness to mark 100 years since the beginning of First World War


As the lights went out, people gathered at the Cenotaph in Whitehall to light their own candles and lay their own flowers and wreaths


The Menin Gate in Ypres, Belgium sits in near darkness, with only one symbolic single light illuminating the Memorial


The Menin Gate, which is maintained by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission, pictured before the lights were turned out


Current troops serving in Afghanistan stand in the darkness of Camp Bastion, which was only lit by a single light. Personnel from all three armed forces took part in the vigil and they were joined by members of the US Marine Corp


The plan was inspired by the words of then-foreign secretary Sir Edward Grey, who said just before the announcement: 'The lamps are going out all over Europe; we shall not see them lit again in our lifetime.'


Other buildings taking part in an hour-long lights switch-off last night were Broadcasting House in London, the Eden Project in Cornwall, St Paul's and Durham cathedrals, and Wales Millennium Centre in Cardiff.

Also expected to join in were office buildings including Barclays in Canary Wharf and Marks & Spencer.


Prime Minister David Cameron has backed the idea and is urging as many people as possible to take part.


Bowing her head: The Duchess of Cambridge during a ceremony at the St Symphorien Cemetery in Belgium


Prince Harry, Belgium's Queen Mathilde, the Duchess of Cambridge, Belgium's King Philippe, Prime Minister David Cameron and Prince William at the St Symphorien cemetery in Mons, Belgium in which Commonwealth and German WWI troops are buried side by side


Commemoration: The Duke of Cambridge (centre) and David Cameron (second right) at the ceremony at St Symphorien Cemetery in Mons, Belgium


Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, , accompanied by Dean of Westminster the Reverend John Hall, right, walks by the tomb of the Unknown Warrior as she attends a candlelit vigil and prayer service to commemorate the centenary of the outbreak of the First World War at Westminster Abbey. The service saw candles being gradually extinguished to leave the abbey in darkness, leaving only the candle at the Tomb of the Unknown Warrior lit


The duchess of Cornwall, second left, extinguishes the remaining flame at the Tomb of the Unknown Warrior


Camilla sits in reflection as she attends the ceremony. In one of her most significant public engagements to date, the Duchess of Cornwall attended the vigil at Westminster Abbey


A single light was shining from Buckingham Palace like many other buildings across the country as 100 years since Britain entered World War One was remembered


Unusual sight: A single window is illuminated in Buckingham Palace as the lights are turned off on iconic buildings around London


Poppies: Piccadilly Circus in London displays memorial images as the lights are turned off on buildings and the UK marks the centenary of the outbreak of the war


Black scene: Piccadilly Circus and the Criterion Theatre turn off their lights to mark the centenary of the outbreak of the First World War


The lights of Picadilly Circus light up central London as people gathered at the landmark to commemorate 100 years since the outbreak of the First World War


A man pauses to reflect at the remembrance event in Piccadilly Circus, where the screens showed memorial images to those gathered


The Houses of Parliament are seen from Westminster Bridge as the lights are turned off on iconic buildings around London to mark the centenary of the outbreak of the war


'Spectra' by Japanese artist Ryoji Ikeda: Acting as beacon for the capital, a monumental pillar of light beamed into the clouds from Victoria Tower Gardens


Shining up: Lights go out across London as the city marks the centenary of the outbreak of the World War One


A man gazes up at the Spectra light installation, top, while a woman takes a picture of the light, which was the only beam to light up London, which fell into darkness at 10pm


Trafalgar Square in central London (top), and candles illuminate the names of missing soldiers at the Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing in Ypres, Belgium (bottom)


Seafront: Blackpool Tower in Lancashire displays a single light on the day the nation commemorates 100 years since Britain joined the First World War


Lights on: Blackpool Tower stands illuminated with a heart Union Jack to mark the 100-year anniversary of Britain joining the First World War



Read more: Britons urged to turn their lights off for First World War centenary | Mail Online
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Last edited by Blackleaf; Aug 5th, 2014 at 10:53 AM..
 
darkbeaver
+1
#3  Top Rated Post
Simply splendid celebration of gross stupidity and mindless carnage. Lucifer fondly remembers.
 

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