Kurdistan - Will it happen?


View Poll Results: Kurdistan - Will they declare?
Yes 5 100.00%
No 0 0%
Not sure 0 0%
Should Canada recognize the new State 0 0%
Yes 3 60.00%
No 0 0%
I support an independent Kurdistan 3 60.00%
I do not support an independent Kurdistan 0 0%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 5. You may not vote on this poll

Goober
+1
#1
Kurdistan - Will they declare?
Iraqi Kurds take step toward independence - The Washington Post

BAGHDAD — Iraq’s Kurdish minority took one step closer Thursday to going its own way, even as politicians in Baghdad, including Kurds, wrangled over the formation of a new central government that would appease the country’s deeply divided factions.

Massoud Barzani, president of the largely autonomous Kurdistan Regional Government, called Thursday for a referendum on the region’s independence, telling the Kurdish parliament to prepare for such a vote, the Associated Press reported.

Barzani’s call came as Iraq’s government denied reports from Saudi news channel al-Arabiya that Iraqi forces had withdrawn from the country’s border with Saudi Arabia, compelling Riyadh to send 30,000 troops to secure its 500-mile shared frontier.

Earlier this week, al-Qaeda-inspired militants from the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria declared an Islamic caliphate spanning the areas under their control from northern Syria to eastern Iraq.

The Sunni militants, who now call themselves the Islamic State, have swiftly seized territory along Iraq’s western borders and have come within 45 miles of Baghdad, the capital.

Lt. General Qassim Atta, a spokesman for Iraq’s armed forces, told reporters Thursday that despite the news reports, the border was under the full control of Iraqi forces.

Iraq has separated into three increasingly distinct territories since the Islamic State routed the government’s forces and took over a vast stretch of territory, including the northern city of Mosul, last month.

The new Iraq, as many analysts are referring to it, consists of a relatively stable far north, long controlled by the Kurds; a western and central swath of territory now controlled by the Sunni jihadists; and a capital and south that remain under the tenuous control of the Shiite-dominated Iraqi government and its militia allies.

In the north, the Kurds have taken advantage of the Iraqi forces’ collapse to consolidate their authority over the contested, oil-rich city of Kirkuk. They also have established a front line against the Islamic State militants to replace what was once a boundary between Iraqi Kurdistan and the rest of the country.

Barzani did not lay out a timeline for independence Thursday, but he told the Kurdish parliament that the Kurds need to “hurry up” in pushing forward with a referendum. They will be “in a better position” if they do so, he said, according to the AP.

Also Thursday, the Islamic State released 32 Turkish truck drivers whom they had captured last month while sweeping across northern Iraq, wire services reported.

The drivers were reunited with their families after they crossed into southern Turkey, according to Reuters.

Some 49 Turks remain in the militants’ hands.

The militants also are holding at least 46 Indian nurses in the central Iraqi city of Tikrit, and according to Indian media they moved the nurses out of a hospital in the city to another location on Thursday.

Iraqi government forces are days into an offensive to retake the city.
 
EagleSmack
+3
#2  Top Rated Post
ISIS sure hit the brakes at the unofficial Kurd border.
 
WLDB
#3
It more or less already exists and has for some time. Sooner or later I imagine it will become formal. When it happens I imagine most in the west will be quick to recognize Kurdistan. They may have trouble with Turkey and other parts of Iraq though.
 
EagleSmack
#4
If they do get recognized I wonder if they will be able to hold it.


I think eventually they will have to really defend themselves.
 
gopher
+1
#5
The future will be interesting as many Kurdi advocates have long been demanding their own independent homeland. But there is a problem (actually many) - will Kurdistan's boundaries include tribal lands in Iran, Syria, and Turkey? Who gets the oil since it is claimed by so many? While Kurdis have long claimed to be victims of ethnic discrimination from Arabs, Turks, and to a lesser extent Iranians, minorities within its borders claim to be victimized by Kurdish authorities. Will they join in on the newly formed political entity or must they be forced out??


Turkey has gone on record that it will invade if a declaration of independence is made. Who else will join the fray to prevent it or join to support it?


Kurdish independence is no guarantee of freedom for anyone. But it should very interesting ...
 
Spade
#6
Not if Turkey has a say.
What does America want? Self determination, as in the Eastern Ukraine, will be secondary.
Territorial integrity anyone?
 
WLDB
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by EagleSmackView Post

If they do get recognized I wonder if they will be able to hold it.


I think eventually they will have to really defend themselves.

They probably have a better chance of holding their own than the current government in Baghdad has.
 
taxslave
#8
Since the current lines onnthe map are arbitrary and suit no one in the area it should not be too difficult to redraw them. No one will like them then either but they will be different.
 
Spade
#9
Turkey is a NATO member. Any move by the Kurds will draw Turkey and NATO in. Independence? Not a chance.
 
damngrumpy
#10
The Kurds are the odd man out in this equation and if they are going to better their lot
they have to move to govern themselves. Iraq could find itself in a state of total civil
war within days. The Kurds whether or not they declare they'll have to defend the
area they are claiming as theirs
 
Spade
+2
#11
There are so many ironies in the Iraq fiasco, I think we are on Version 14.7.3
 
WLDB
+1
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by damngrumpyView Post

Iraq could find itself in a state of total civil
war within days. The Kurds whether or not they declare they'll have to defend the
area they are claiming as theirs

They've been in a civil war for years.

Quote: Originally Posted by SpadeView Post

Turkey is a NATO member. Any move by the Kurds will draw Turkey and NATO in. Independence? Not a chance.

The Iraqi portion could. The Turks wouldn't let their part go Im sure, but who knows. Perhaps the Kurds in Turkey will resist the Turkish government on that. Turkey like Iraq is just another country arbitrarily thrown on the map at the end of WW1.
 
EagleSmack
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by damngrumpyView Post

The Kurds are the odd man out in this equation and if they are going to better their lot
they have to move to govern themselves. Iraq could find itself in a state of total civil
war within days. The Kurds whether or not they declare they'll have to defend the
area they are claiming as theirs


IMO Iraq is in a full blown Civil War already.
 
gopher
+1
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by SpadeView Post

Turkey is a NATO member. Any move by the Kurds will draw Turkey and NATO in. Independence? Not a chance.



NATO stood by as Turkey invaded its own Kurdish province and killed more Kurds than Saddam did. If Kurds in that country decide to leave Ankara will likely give an F-U to NATO and kill even more people.
 
Spade
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by gopherView Post

NATO stood by as Turkey invaded its own Kurdish province and killed more Kurds than Saddam did. If Kurds in that country decide to leave Ankara will likely give an F-U to NATO and kill even more people.

As a NATO member, if regional squabbles break out, NATO would be obligated to assist Turkey. Another irony thanks to George II.
 
darkbeaver
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by EagleSmackView Post

If they do get recognized I wonder if they will be able to hold it.
I think eventually they will have to really defend themselves.

They are already 100% zionist owned and operated, defending themselves against that will leave only the oil intact.
 
EagleSmack
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by darkbeaverView Post

They are already 100% zionist owned and operated, defending themselves against that will leave only the oil intact.


Cmon DB... you can participate more than this illuminati BS.
 
darkbeaver
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by EagleSmackView Post

Cmon DB... you can participate more than this illuminati BS.

The first tanker delivered to Israel.
 
WLDB
+1
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by SpadeView Post

As a NATO member, if regional squabbles break out, NATO would be obligated to assist Turkey. Another irony thanks to George II.

Saw a movie that said NATO stood for "No Action, Talk Only." I wouldn't mind if it went that way on this issue. Or if it just ceased to exist altogether. The Cold War is done.
 
darkbeaver
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by SpadeView Post

As a NATO member, if regional squabbles break out, NATO would be obligated to assist Turkey. Another irony thanks to George II.

NATO is a paper tiger. Their assistance would be to get crushed the first week.

Quote: Originally Posted by EagleSmackView Post

IMO Iraq is in a full blown Civil War already.

You always neglect the details. Another American death dance. It's indepen-dense day shouldn't you be looking for alien invasion forces?
 
Goober
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by SpadeView Post

Not if Turkey has a say.
What does America want? Self determination, as in the Eastern Ukraine, will be secondary.
Territorial integrity anyone?

These States borders were defined by the English & French.
 
Nuggler
#22
Maybe I can finally go home.
 
Goober
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by SpadeView Post

As a NATO member, if regional squabbles break out, NATO would be obligated to assist Turkey. Another irony thanks to George II.

Only if Article 5 is approved by NATO countries.
Turkeys contribution to this mess has been to allow insurgents easy passage into and out of the region.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/04/wo...html?ref=world

WASHINGTON — Senior Kurdish officials served notice on Thursday that Kurdistan would not participate in a new Iraqi government unless Baghdad grants it expanded autonomy and does not insist on reversing their occupation of Kirkuk.

“We are going to give once again a chance to the political process in Baghdad, but we are not going to think that is the only path,” said Fuad Hussein, the chief of staff to Massoud Barzani, the president of the Kurdish autonomous region.

“Parallel to that we are going to build ourselves, and we are heading toward exercising self-determination,” Mr. Hussein added before he went to the White House to see Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. and Antony Blinken, the deputy national security adviser.

Mr. Hussein’s comments came as Mr. Barzani asked the Kurdish Parliament, in a closed-door speech, to organize a referendum on independence, a move that caused dismay among Sunni and Shiite politicians in Baghdad.

Secretary of State John Kerry has urged the Kurds to play a leading role in forming a unified government in Baghdad and to defer their dreams of independence. Or as Mr. Kerry put it in a meeting with the Kurdish president in Erbil last week, “this moment requires statesmanship.”
 
Goober
#24
Another step in the process. How it turns out, well
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/12/wo...ref=world&_r=0

BAGHDAD ó The dangerous struggle between the leadership of Iraq and the countryís Kurdish minority intensified Friday, as the Kurds seized two oil production facilities in Kirkuk Province and the prime minister announced that he was appointing a temporary replacement for the foreign minister.

The prime minister, Nuri Kamal al-Maliki, a Shiite, moved to replace the current foreign minister, Hoshyar Zebari, a Kurd, with Hussain Shahristani, a Shiite from Mr. Malikiís bloc. Mr. Maliki was responding to a decision by Mr. Zebari and other Kurdish cabinet members to boycott cabinet meetings in protest of Mr. Malikiís searing criticism of the Kurds this week.

In a televised address on Wednesday, Mr. Maliki charged that the Kurds were harboring Sunni militant opponents of the central government and were even allowing members of the group known as the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, which swept through northern Iraq in June, to organize operations from Kurdistan.

The replacement of Mr. Zebari infuriated the Kurds, but it also appeared to solidify their resolve to move ahead with the constitutional procedure to select a new government, including a president, prime minister and Parliament speaker.
 
BaalsTears
#25
Kurdistan contains both Iraqi and Syrian territory. It appears economically viable because of its control of Iraqi oilfields and friendly relationship with Turkey. The Kurdish defense force called the Peshmerga is disciplined and well armed. The Peshmerga is receiving military assistance from Israel. I don't see why the Kurds can't make a go of it.
 

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