The Queen honoured with renaming of Paris flower market


Blackleaf
#1
The people of Paris have paid tribute to the Queen by naming a flower market in the city after her.

Earlier today she and the Duke of Edinburgh, who travelled the fairly short journey from London to Paris by Eurostar, toured the market that will henceforth be known as Marche aux Fleurs - Reine Elizabeth II (Flower Market - Queen Elizabeth II).

It marked the end of the monarch's three-day state visit to France to mark D-Day's 70th anniversary. The Queen - the only surviving head of state today to have served in WWII - was the only head of state of all those attending the D-Day commemorations to be honoured by the French with a state visit.

Sir Bradley Wiggins who, in 2012, became the first Briton to win the Tour de France, also attended the flower market close to Notre Dame Cathedral, in the centre of the city.

On Thursday, at the British ambassador's residence in Paris, a garden party was held for the Queen's birthday, in which British food and drink was served to guests including World War Two veterans from France and the UK.

yesterday, during a speech on Sword Beach - one of the beaches on which the British landed on 6th June 1944 - Mr Hollande described Britain and France as being "like twins" and concluded: "I lift my glass to the great British people, ally and friend of the French people."

Queen honoured with renaming of Paris flower market


7 June 2014
BBC News


The Queen was shown around the flower market by French President Francois Hollande


The people of Paris have paid tribute to the Queen by naming a flower market in her honour.

She and the Duke of Edinburgh toured the market that will henceforth be known as Marche aux Fleurs - Reine Elizabeth II on Saturday.

It marked the end of the British monarch's three-day visit to France to mark the 70th anniversary of D-Day.


As the only head of state to be given a state visit, the Queen was the most honoured of all the heads of state who visited Normandy

On Friday she joined other heads of state on Sword Beach to commemorate veterans and their fallen comrades.

The Queen, who visited the market on her first trip to the country in 1948, unveiled a plaque to mark her visit.

Afterward she boarded a private plane with the Duke of Edinburgh following a ceremonial departure from France, attended by French President Francois Hollande.


The Queen was welcomed by Paris mayor Anne Hidalgo at the capital's city hall ahead of a tour of the flower market



The Queen and Duke of Edinburgh are on the last day of their three-day state visit to commemorate D-Day in Normandy



Friendly neighbours: The Queen spoke of Britain's friendship with France at a banquet in Paris


On Thursday, at the British ambassador's residence in Paris, a garden party was held for the Queen's birthday, in which British food and drink was served to guests including World War Two veterans from France and the UK. Here's the Queen shaking hands with 2012 Tour de France winner and London 2012 gold medallist Sir Bradley Wiggins at the event

Earlier in the day, the Queen visited Paris' City Hall where she was welcomed by mayor Anne Hidalgo and hundreds of well-wishers who lined the streets outside.

Sir Bradley Wiggins, the first Briton to win the Tour de France, also attended the flower market close to Notre Dame Cathedral, in the centre of the city.

He attended with a team of charity cyclists who are travelling from Brussels to London, via Paris, to raise money for Help for Heroes.

On Friday night, the Queen was guest of honour at an Elysee Palace banquet hosted by President Hollande.

She spoke of her pride in the courage of the Allied forces who took part in the D-Day landings, but added: "Our peace and prosperity can never be taken for granted and must constantly be tended, so that never again do we have cause to build monuments to our fallen youth."

Alternating between English and French, a language in which she is fluent, she also told the banquet that Britain and France each have a role to play as "two of the trustees of international peace and security".

In a speech described as warm and affectionate in tone, Mr Hollande said the Queen was a woman who personified the phrase: "Keep calm and carry on".

Mr Hollande described the two nations as being "like twins" and concluded: "I lift my glass to the great British people, ally and friend of the French people."

Nicholas Witchell, BBC Royal Correspondent, in Paris

Sometimes the passage of years makes it easier to say those things that are most heartfelt.

Queen Elizabeth II is greatly respected in France. She is a hereditary monarch visiting a country which, though it dispensed with its kings and queens several centuries ago, still enjoys the pomp and grandeur which is such an indispensable part of monarchy.

She also represents those qualities of dignity and devotion to duty which the French rather admire and which, perhaps, they wish were more evident in the upper echelons of their own establishment.

But most importantly in the context of this week's 70th anniversary of D-Day, Elizabeth II is from that wartime generation, so many members of which made the ultimate sacrifice in order to rescue the French nation from subjugation by the Nazis.

The Second World War hasn't always been an easy subject for France to deal with. Yet deep in its heart it's always known the debt that it owes to the people of the United Kingdom and its allies for the liberation from tyranny which began when the landing craft went ashore in Normandy on 6 June 1944.

In inviting Elizabeth II to attend the D-Day commemoration as part of a State Visit, France has made her the most honoured of all the heads of state who will be in Normandy on Friday.

Partly that is a personal tribute to her and the 62 years of her reign. But one senses that it is also France's way of expressing its most heartfelt gratitude to the entire British D-Day generation.


BBC News - Queen honoured with renaming of Paris flower market (external - login to view)
Last edited by Blackleaf; Jun 7th, 2014 at 06:00 AM..
 
Nuggler
+1
#2  Top Rated Post
"yesterday, during a speech on Sword Beach - one of the beaches on which the British landed on 6th June 1944 - Mr Hollande described Britain and France as being "like twins" and concluded: "I lift my glass to the great British people, ally and friend of the French people."

Nope, sorry Frenchie boy; twins youse ain't.
But, you may wish all you want

Friends, ok, long as you are respectful, and fetch and carry well.

idiot.
 
captain morgan
#3
What's the French phrase for 'surrender monkey'?

Maybe it didn't sound very poetic when inserted into the speech?
 
Nuggler
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by captain morganView Post

What's the French phrase for 'surrender monkey'?

Maybe it didn't sound very poetic when inserted into the speech?


S'il vous plaît, ne tirez pas, je suis un singe de reddition Français. J'ai des enfants et une femme, et je vais vous payer

Pretty close


BUT: The French resistance was pretty damn good, and very brave. Not a few of them were tortured to death by the Gestapo, and never broke.
 
DaSleeper
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by NugglerView Post

S'il vous plaît, ne tirez pas, je suis un singe de reddition Français. J'ai des enfants et une femme, et je vais vous payer

Pretty close


BUT: The French resistance was pretty damn good, and very brave. Not a few of them were tortured to death by the Gestapo, and never broke.

And a lot of them were Women in the Résistance (external - login to view)
 

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