72-year-old wartime mystery solved


Twila
+3
#1  Top Rated Post
72-year-old wartime mystery solved | Globalnews.ca (external - login to view)

The crew of a war plane that went missing 72 years ago during a training flight from Patricia Bay has finally been found.

The remains of four airmen were recovered earlier this month.

Their plane went missing on Oct. 30, 1942 on a navigation training exercise.

After the aircraft failed to return to the air force base, searches immediately following the disappearance did not locate the plane or any wreckage.

The four airmen on board were presumed to have died, and their names were listed on the Ottawa Memorial.

The wreckage was finally located on southern Vancouver Island in October 2013 by a logging company working in the area.

The crew members have now been identified as Royal Canadian Air Force Sgt. William Baird and British Royal Air Force Pilot Officers Charles Fox, Anthony William Lawrence and Sgt. Robert Ernest Luckock.

The recovery is a joint effort between the British Columbia Coroners Service and the Department of National Defence (DND).

Canadaís Department of National Defence and Britainís Ministry of Defence have contacted surviving family members of the deceased to inform them of the recovery.

DND is working to plan for an internment ceremony to provide the airmen with a final honoured and appropriate resting place in a Commonwealth War Graves plot.

More than 100 aircrew lost their lives while flying out of Patricia Bay during the Second World War.
 
lone wolf
+2
#2
There are stories about a plane on the bottom of Wahnapitei - a very deep and cold lake near here. Sooner or later, the dead come to rest. Rest in Peace, Airmen....
 
damngrumpy
+2
#3
The remaining family members will finally have some closure. It gives us pause
to think just how big our Province is that a plane could go missing all this time
without anyone stumbling across it. History keeps finding us in the decades
since this conflict. They have found planes and bodies on battlefields and they
have come across artifacts that live on as testament to the struggle itself.
It is good to see that they have at last been found and will be returned home
 
Sal
+1
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by TwilaView Post

72-year-old wartime mystery solved | Globalnews.ca (external - login to view)

The crew of a war plane that went missing 72 years ago during a training flight from Patricia Bay has finally been found.

The remains of four airmen were recovered earlier this month.

Their plane went missing on Oct. 30, 1942 on a navigation training exercise.

After the aircraft failed to return to the air force base, searches immediately following the disappearance did not locate the plane or any wreckage.

The four airmen on board were presumed to have died, and their names were listed on the Ottawa Memorial.

The wreckage was finally located on southern Vancouver Island in October 2013 by a logging company working in the area.

The crew members have now been identified as Royal Canadian Air Force Sgt. William Baird and British Royal Air Force Pilot Officers Charles Fox, Anthony William Lawrence and Sgt. Robert Ernest Luckock.

The recovery is a joint effort between the British Columbia Coroners Service and the Department of National Defence (DND).

Canadaís Department of National Defence and Britainís Ministry of Defence have contacted surviving family members of the deceased to inform them of the recovery.

DND is working to plan for an internment ceremony to provide the airmen with a final honoured and appropriate resting place in a Commonwealth War Graves plot.

More than 100 aircrew lost their lives while flying out of Patricia Bay during the Second World War.

incredibly sad, but finally resolved
 
taxslave
#5
Just saw this on the news but they didn't say where on the island. Anyone got a location?
 
gopher
+1
#6
so sad but at least their families can now have some much deserved closure
 
IdRatherBeSkiing
+1
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by SalView Post

incredibly sad, but finally resolved

It's not sad. It was highly unlikely they would be found alive.
 
JLM
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslaveView Post

Just saw this on the news but they didn't say where on the island. Anyone got a location?


Near Port Renfrew. (I know the area quite well, salal 15' high is quite common)

71 years gone but never forgotten: airmen, plane wreckage found on Vancouver Island - The Globe and Mail

Quote: Originally Posted by damngrumpyView Post

The remaining family members will finally have some closure. It gives us pause
to think just how big our Province is that a plane could go missing all this time
without anyone stumbling across it. History keeps finding us in the decades
since this conflict. They have found planes and bodies on battlefields and they
have come across artifacts that live on as testament to the struggle itself.
It is good to see that they have at last been found and will be returned home


Back in the early '80s I spent a winter working in that country working on road and bridge surveys and to believe it you would have to see the country. A plane could crash 50 yards off the main road and possibly never be found. Rain accumulations of 25 inches in one month isn't uncommon and many areas are just a mass of windfalls and salal 10-15' high.
 
Twila
+1
#9
on a dark morbid note, it would have been quite the feeling to have discovered this. To be the first to come across it. Especially in such an area. The rainforests in Van Isl are spectacular. The forest would have had ample opportunity to reclaim the space. It would have been similar to a sunken ship in the water...eerie and quiet. A piece of history that only a few people would have seen (at first).

To have discovered it and been responsible for solving the mystery...
 
SLM
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by IdRatherBeSkiingView Post

It's not sad. It was highly unlikely they would be found alive.

For sure, I'd have been shocked.
 
taxslave
#11
Some rugged groung there for sure. One of the few parts of the Island I have never worked.
 
Sal
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by IdRatherBeSkiingView Post

It's not sad. It was highly unlikely they would be found alive.

LOL... it is sad that it took this long to find it, all those years of not knowing what happened to someone, all those years of wondering, maybe, just maybe they will walk through the door...

I think long after you have accepted that they are dead a small piece of the individual hopes...

it is sad that they were dead all along with no proof...to be told someone is proof positive dead is hard enough, to be told someone has vanished is a whole other nightmare

the questions would be endless
 
JLM
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by TwilaView Post

on a dark morbid note, it would have been quite the feeling to have discovered this. To be the first to come across it. Especially in such an area. The rainforests in Van Isl are spectacular. The forest would have had ample opportunity to reclaim the space. It would have been similar to a sunken ship in the water...eerie and quiet. A piece of history that only a few people would have seen (at first).

To have discovered it and been responsible for solving the mystery...


Knowing that country the way I do, it most likely wouldn't unfold quite as you think. It's not like you would be suddenly confronted with the whole scene at once. The salal and underbrush is so thick you would probably just stumble over something you wouldn't even be able to identify at first and eventually you might find two or three pieces and decide to bring in a clearing crew with machetes and chain saws to open things up to see what's actually there. Of course over 70 years there would be a lot of deterioration and rust.

Quote: Originally Posted by taxslaveView Post

Some rugged groung there for sure. One of the few parts of the Island I have never worked.



And you don't want to! -
 
EagleSmack
+1
#14
A loud crash... then silence for 72 years.
 
#juan
#15
Intresting....A fairly large Fir tree is seen growing through the wreckage. It would have been a seedling or a sapling when this airplane crashed.

 
Twila
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by JLMView Post

Knowing that country the way I do, it most likely wouldn't unfold quite as you think. It's not like you would be suddenly confronted with the whole scene at once. The salal and underbrush is so thick you would probably just stumble over something you wouldn't even be able to identify at first and eventually you might find two or three pieces and decide to bring in a clearing crew with machetes and chain saws to open things up to see what's actually there. Of course over 70 years there would be a lot of deterioration and rust.




Probably not, but the people that discovered it....discovered it. They knew they were seeing something, and then they got to experience it unfold. That's what would be exciting and errie and interesting.
 
JLM
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslaveView Post

Some rugged groung there for sure. One of the few parts of the Island I have never worked.


Just to give you some idea visualize the country between Kennedy Lake and Tofino and multiply the undergrowth and debris times five!
 
shadowshiv
+1
#18


That soldier's camo really worked in that picture. Had it not been for the gloves he's wearing, I would not have seen him!

At least now their remains (however much is left after so long) will have a proper burial.
 
no new posts