Judge decides to sentence convicted rapist to do 250 hours of community service


Locutus
#1
via fark:

TX Rape Crisis center says "Oh HELL No. Dafuq were you thinking, anyway?" after Judge decides to sentence convicted rapist to do 250 hours of community service at the center in lieu of jail time (external - login to view)


the fukking skank

A Texas judge who ordered a rapist to serve community service at a rape crisis center has been forced to reconsider the sentence.

In a police interview, Sir Young admitted that he had raped a 14-year-old girl in 2011 at Booker T. Washington High School for the Performing and Visual Arts when he was 18.

“I hate to have that on my plate. But that’s rape,” he told police.

According to The Dallas Observer (external - login to view), Young could have served 20 years in jail, but Dallas County District Judge Jeanine Howard showed him leniency during last week’s sentencing.

Howard ruled that Young would only have to spend 45 days in jail, but it was the “250 hours of community service at a rape crisis center” that shocked victim advocates.



more


Rape crisis center scolds Texas judge after she sentences rapist to work with victims there (external - login to view)
 
SLM
+1
#2
Having a convicted rapist volunteer at a rape crisis centre. What a wonderful way to pour copious amounts of salt into a fresh wound! How the hell do these people keep their jobs?
 
Tecumsehsbones
+1
#3
I don't think we have enough information. I can see how this could be reasonable.
 
Locutus
#4
information (external - login to view)
 
SLM
+1
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by TecumsehsbonesView Post

I don't think we have enough information. I can see how this could be reasonable.

You think it's reasonable that a woman that's just been raped should be having to deal with a convicted rapist at the place where she's supposed to be getting help?

It was a stupid judgement and a huge slap in the face to rape victims.
 
Tecumsehsbones
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by SLMView Post

You think it's reasonable that a woman that's just been raped should be having to deal with a convicted rapist at the place where she's supposed to be getting help?

No, of course not. Now I have a question for you. Do you think that his service at the rape crisis center would necessarily involve interacting with rape victims?

Here's another one. Do you think if he was emptying the trash, washing dishes, mopping the floors, doing laundry, that rape victims would know he was a rapist?
 
Twila
+2
#7  Top Rated Post
I think this punishment of serving community service in a rape crisis centre is like asking a convicted pedo to sort through child pornography.

If control and humiliation are his sexual preferences being around those that have suffered is only a pleasure for him. It also would put at risk women who are already quite vulnerable.
 
SLM
+1
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by TecumsehsbonesView Post

No, of course not. Now I have a question for you. Do you think that his service at the rape crisis center would necessarily involve interacting with rape victims?

It's a horrible idea all around. The one place that a rapist should not be present at, in any capacity, is the one place where victims of sexual assault can go to feel safe and deal with the trauma. Who cares if they interact with him directly or not, just having him there is an affront.

Quote:

Here's another one. Do you think if he was emptying the trash, washing dishes, mopping the floors, doing laundry, that rape victims would know he was a rapist?

Goodness knows there is no place else where someone can perform community service by taking out the trash.
 
Tecumsehsbones
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by SLMView Post

It's a horrible idea all around. The one place that a rapist should not be present at, in any capacity, is the one place where victims of sexual assault can go to feel safe and deal with the trauma. Who cares if they interact with him directly or not, just having him there is an affront.

So, not answering the question? Good tactic.

Quote:

Goodness knows there is no place else where someone can perform community service by taking out the trash.

There certainly is. I agree that the judge made a misjudgment in not seeing how this would play in the outrage-mill media.
 
SLM
+1
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by TecumsehsbonesView Post

So, not answering the question? Good tactic.

Who cares if it's a direct interaction or not, just the knowledge that he's there is going to do damage to already damaged individuals. Do you grasp the concept of what it takes for a victim of a traumatic experience to feel safe?

Again they have one place to go, he has many where he can be sent.


Quote:

There certainly is. I agree that the judge made a misjudgment in not seeing how this would play in the outrage-mill media.

What is the purpose of assigning community service to a specific place? To do generic things like take out the trash? Or is the purpose generally to drive home the point of their bad behaviour by immersing them in the fallout of such behaviour?
 
Tecumsehsbones
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by SLMView Post

Who cares if it's a direct interaction or not, just the knowledge that he's there is going to do damage to already damaged individuals. Do you grasp the concept of what it takes for a victim of a traumatic experience to feel safe?

How are they going to know?

Quote:

What is the purpose of assigning community service to a specific place? To do generic things like take out the trash? Or is the purpose generally to drive home the point of their bad behaviour by immersing them in the fallout of such behaviour?

The second, to some extent. Also a certain sense of "serve the group you offended."
 
Goober
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by TecumsehsbonesView Post

I don't think we have enough information. I can see how this could be reasonable.

Here ya go.
DISD | Dallas Morning News (external - login to view)

Original post: A 20-year-old man pleaded guilty Thursday in a Dallas County courtroom to raping a girl when they were both students at Booker T. Washington High School for the Performing and Visual Arts.

The attack occurred in a practice room during school in October 2011 when Sir Young was 18 and she was 14. The two were kissing and she told him to stop when he started rubbing her body over he clothes. But he kept going and eventually took off her leggings and raped her.

Young, who was arrested at school a week after the rape, has asked state District Judge Jeanine Howard to decide his sentence. He faces two to 20 years in prison but he is also eligible for probation.

The victim testified that she told Young “no” and “stop” before and during the rape.

“I didn’t want to do anything other than kiss,” she said, answering questions from prosecutor Brandi Mitchell.

When questioned by Young’s attorney, Scottie Allen, the girl testified that she had talked with Young about having sex.


In a video recorded interview with Dallas police detective Denise Rodriguez that was played in court, Young initially said that the girl said no at first but then didn’t tell him to stop. But then, he admitted that the girl told him to stop numerous times, including during the sexual assault.

When Rodriguez described what happened and asked if that was rape, Young said, “That’s rape. I hate to have that on my plate. But that’s rape.”
 
Tecumsehsbones
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by GooberView Post

Here ya go.
DISD | Dallas Morning News (external - login to view)

Original post: A 20-year-old man pleaded guilty Thursday in a Dallas County courtroom to raping a girl when they were both students at Booker T. Washington High School for the Performing and Visual Arts.

The attack occurred in a practice room during school in October 2011 when Sir Young was 18 and she was 14. The two were kissing and she told him to stop when he started rubbing her body over he clothes. But he kept going and eventually took off her leggings and raped her.

Young, who was arrested at school a week after the rape, has asked state District Judge Jeanine Howard to decide his sentence. He faces two to 20 years in prison but he is also eligible for probation.

The victim testified that she told Young “no” and “stop” before and during the rape.

“I didn’t want to do anything other than kiss,” she said, answering questions from prosecutor Brandi Mitchell.

When questioned by Young’s attorney, Scottie Allen, the girl testified that she had talked with Young about having sex.


In a video recorded interview with Dallas police detective Denise Rodriguez that was played in court, Young initially said that the girl said no at first but then didn’t tell him to stop. But then, he admitted that the girl told him to stop numerous times, including during the sexual assault.

When Rodriguez described what happened and asked if that was rape, Young said, “That’s rape. I hate to have that on my plate. But that’s rape.”

Snap! Found the same story while you were putting up your post.

OK, crazy judge. Shouldn't be on the bench. Stupid sentence. Defendant should be doing hard time.
 
SLM
+1
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by TecumsehsbonesView Post

How are they going to know?

Are criminal courts top secret in the US? Are the judgements rendered not available to the public? I find that surprising given how this was published in the newspaper.

Even if it's not, for the sake of argument let's say it isn't, are you suggesting that the director(s) and staff of the rape crisis center withhold such information from the women seeking help, effectively lying to them? Do the woman not have a right to know this information, if it would affect their decision to go to that center and feel safe there in dealing with their trauma?

Quote:

The second, to some extent. Also a certain sense of "serve the group you offended."

Rape is already in a constant battle not to be marginalized in society. I wouldn't even want to guess the numbers of people who still think things like "she had it coming" or "she shouldn't have been wearing that" to excuse/justify an act of violence perpetrated upon someone. Placing a convicted rapist at a rape crisis center is tantamount to saying the victims don't matter as far as I'm concerned.
 
Goober
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by TecumsehsbonesView Post

Snap! Found the same story while you were putting up your post.

OK, crazy judge. Shouldn't be on the bench. Stupid sentence. Defendant should be doing hard time.

Just the though of sentencing this creep to do service at the Rape Crisis Center, well I think her head is up her a-s-s.
 
Tecumsehsbones
+1
#16
Yep, you win, SLM. The judge is a nutbar.

Proceeding on a "OK, maybe this judge isn't crazy" and the lack of information in the OP, I constructed a plausible scenario where this sentence could seem reasonable. As I have indicated, I don't think much of the outrage-mill media.

Goober and I found a much more informative account, and it turns out that even a blind pig finds an acorn every once in a while.

I could still argue some of your points, but this is far from the best forum for it. Maybe some other time.

Suffice to say: the defendant should be doing hard time, the judge should be off the bench. She's a moonbat.


Judge Jeanine Howard is grateful for her job, loves what she does and is hopeful that she does it well, but her path to the bench is far from traditional.

Judge Howard attended St. Thomas Aquinas Catholic School for eight years before transferring to Hillcrest High School. After graduation she moved to Denton to study sociology at North Texas State University (now called UNT). She worked at Sears, then at First Denton National Bank before moving back home to Dallas.

After nine months of training at Executive Secretarial School, she worked as a legal secretary before getting a spot as a secretary at General Dynamics/Lockheed Martin. The aeronautical giant allowed for tuition reimbursement, funding her attendance at TCU night school where she was quite proud of her straight A’s and *** laude status as she earned a degree in Business Management.

She then went on to SMU Law School, where she was Order of the Coif. During her third year, she met her husband Steve. They married in October of ’87 and had their first child, Holly, the following year.

Judge Howard initially practiced civil law for more than two years focusing on deposition preparation and research. When she found out the District Attorney’s office was hiring in the spring of 1990, she longed for the opportunity to get into the courtroom. When none other than John Vance called her at 8:00 p.m. one night to offer her the job, she thought it was some kind of practical joke. She accepted the job and while she was in the District Attorney’s office her second daughter, Theresa, was born.

As her daughters grew, she longed to spend more time at home and found a way to strike a balance between motherhood and the practice of law. She had seen and experienced some of the pitfalls of office dynamics early on in her career and wanted to streamline her professional life to make more room for her personal life. She had typed her way through law school; so preparing her own documents came naturally, eliminating the need for staff assistance. Rather than opening an office, she met clients at their convenience—sometimes at a Starbucks and sometimes borrowing a good friend’s conference room if necessary. A large portion of her work involved appeals with the client staying as a guest of the State. By running a virtual office, she could spend time with her family on her own schedule.

With both girls near graduation in 2005, Judge Howard began exploring the possibility of becoming a judge. Having experience in private practice, experience in the District Attorney’s office, and an understanding of appellate law and trial work, she felt uniquely situated to serve the people of Dallas County. In her time on the bench, she believes she has.

She’s most proud of her First Friday program. At any given time, between 10 and 15 young offenders, (ages 17 to 22) who lack structure or parental guidance, meet directly with the judge once a month while on supervision in addition to their other obligations. Reverend Ronald Wright assists her in reaching these wayward young people to help align their intentions and keep them succeeding while on probation. Her goal for them, and for all those on probation, is to correct whatever behavioral patterns that led to putting the defendant squarely in the lights of law enforcement. While meeting financial obligations is important, she will often reduce recommended fines and supervision fees (for cause) to keep the focus on reporting and participating in probation. She would never want poverty to interfere with a person successfully turning their life around. She always tells the people in her court, “Don’t ever let money be a reason you don’t report.”

In her courtroom, Judge Howard prefers all pleas on the record, lawyers and clients dressed for court in a respectful way, and please, no cell phones.

She enjoys the camaraderie of the legal community and enjoys having lawyers that appear in her court stop by to get to know her better. If you do, you may find she shares your interests in authors James Patterson or Mary Higgins Clark. Ask her about her treasured willow tree and you will find yourself engaged in a conversation with an avid gardener who enjoys taking the time to hand water her plants as a way to unwind after a long day at the Crowley courts building.
 
SLM
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by TecumsehsbonesView Post

Yep, you win, SLM. The judge is a nutbar.

Proceeding on a "OK, maybe this judge isn't crazy" and the lack of information in the OP, I constructed a plausible scenario where this sentence could seem reasonable. As I have indicated, I don't think much of the outrage-mill media.

I don't give a damn about the outrage-mill media either. I formulate my own opinions.

I do however care that individuals who've been subjected to an invasive violent act upon their person, where seeking some kind of legal redress usually also involves some pretty invasive acts as well, has a least one small sanctuary where they can go to begin healing. Whether the judge is a certified whacko or had a bad day, I don't care. I believe the concept of sentencing a rapist to community service at a rape crisis center to be a bad one.
 
Tecumsehsbones
+1
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by SLMView Post

I don't give a damn about the outrage-mill media either. I formulate my own opinions.

I do however care that individuals who've been subjected to an invasive violent act upon their person, where seeking some kind of legal redress usually also involves some pretty invasive acts as well, has a least one small sanctuary where they can go to begin healing. Whether the judge is a certified whacko or had a bad day, I don't care. I believe the concept of sentencing a rapist to community service at a rape crisis center to be a bad one.

Unfortunately, you're probably right. I can see how a convicted rapist, used properly, could be an asset at a rape crisis center. But the odds that the rapist would be used properly are next to zero.

Sorry, your points are well taken. I got kinda carried away with the idea that intelligent, perceptive people can do good things. I'm afraid I spend too much time with intelligent, perceptive people. Get to thinking they're the norm.
 
spaminator
#19
Rapist gets probation because girl 'wasn't the victim she claimed to be'
QMI Agency
First posted: Friday, May 02, 2014 12:06 PM EDT | Updated: Friday, May 02, 2014 12:19 PM EDT
A Dallas, Texas, judge sentenced an admitted rapist to probation because she says the 14-year-old girl he assaulted wasn't a virgin and "wasn't the victim she claimed to be."
The decision caused outrage in the community, but State District Judge Jeanine Howard defended sentencing Sir Young, 20, to 45 days in prison, probation and he must volunteer at a rape crisis centre, the Dallas Morning News reported (external - login to view).
The girl, now 17, admitted she wanted to kiss the then-18-year-old boy, but when he wanted to have sex, she said no and told him to stop during the assault at their high school.
But Howard said the girl had been sexually active before, had a baby, and had shown interest in Young.
"She wasn't the victim she claimed to be," Howard said. "He is not your typical sex offender."
The girl told the paper she now believes "it would have been better for me not to say anything."
Rapist gets probation because girl 'wasn't the victim she claimed to be' | World (external - login to view)
 
gerryh
+2
#20
This say's it all when it comes to her sentencing decision.

Howard said she never intended for Young to work with rape victims. She said her decision to order his hours to be performed there was “spur of the moment.” She had thought he could mop floors, mow the lawn or cook.


Disgusting.
 
damngrumpy
#21
As the great liberated society based on justice and freedom and a lot of other things we
go half way round the world to condemn India, Pakistan and dozens of other countries
about the way women are treated and judged. Then right in our own back yard of North
America we behave the same way. The Judge is a nut case of course in the Excited
States anything is possible. Didn't they also come up with the idea that some criminals
are not really guilty of their crimes because they were too wealthy or something of that
nature.
I am not saying things are better in Canada we have the same Neanderthals we just
haven't presented the same verdict yet This is disgusting reprehensible and just plain nuts.
 
Locutus
#22
*threads merged
 
PoliticalNick
+1
#23
I'm a little torn on this one. I believe 'no means no' and both men and women need to have self-control yet I have an issue with somebody going to the courts presenting themselves as something they are not. She was obviously promiscuous and there is quite a strong chance that at 14 she was giving the wrong signals to another immature person. That doesn't excuse him from not stopping when she said no but then again how do we know she did say no given her past history. It leaves one with many more questions than answers and that is a good reason to not toss the book at some kid.

The sentence to work at a rape crisis center is actually good in my mind. This guy is not your stereo-typical violent rapist. I believe he was immature and presented with a partner known to be promiscuous and did not have the requisite maturity to understand or control his urges. I am not presented with a picture of a boy who will become a serial rapist but one who made a mistake and he may learn a great deal from spending time around victims of rape. As long as he is supervised and educated this may be a very good thing in the end.

Overall this is a tough situation. I hate to see someone spend their lives classed as a sex-offender for the wrong reasons yet still believe all people need to understand no means no at all times. I hope they both are able to learn and grow from this experience.
 
gerryh
+2
#24
Quote: Originally Posted by PoliticalNickView Post


Overall this is a tough situation. I hate to see someone spend their lives classed as a sex-offender for the wrong reasons yet still believe all people need to understand no means no at all times. I hope they both are able to learn and grow from this experience.


Ya, she is learning that the judicial system still blames the victim and he is learning that society still takes a females past as being mitigating circumstances.
 
MHz
+1
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by TecumsehsbonesView Post

I don't think we have enough information. I can see how this could be reasonable.

Jail wouldn't have been any help in the rehabilitation dept. (unless the inmates beat the crap out of him daily) Having to be around many other rape victims may have a result that allows empathy to enter his addled mind. That may work for some college aged person who didn't stop when he should have rather than it being a serial rapist and this was his 10th victim.
 
Twila
+1
#26
This young man did admit to it being rape

Quote:

In a police interview, Sir Young admitted that he had raped a 14-year-old girl in 2011 at Booker T. Washington High School for the Performing and Visual Arts when he was 18.

“I hate to have that on my plate. But that’s rape,” he told police.

He has admitted to what he did and has recognized his behavior as being heinous. He has the potential to be rehabilitated and that IS what we should want for him.

His taking responsibility will go a long way to helping the young woman come to terms with what has happened too.

He should receive punishment AND therapy. He will be released and will need to navigate society again. It would serve no one's best interest if he is treated no better then scum and then released.
 
gerryh
#27
Quote: Originally Posted by TwilaView Post

This young man did admit to it being rape



He has admitted to what he did and has recognized his behavior as being heinous. He has the potential to be rehabilitated and that IS what we should want for him.

His taking responsibility will go a long way to helping the young woman come to terms with what has happened too.

He should receive punishment AND therapy. He will be released and will need to navigate society again. It would serve no one's best interest if he is treated no better then scum and then released.


He is no better than scum, and I question the job his parents did.
 
damngrumpy
#28
Anyone who assaults a fourteen year old girl cannot be trusted for rehabilitation
period no matter how much conniving and weaseling this guy does should qualify
him for even the slightest break
 
PoliticalNick
+1
#29
Seems Loc merged another thread with this on as I was posting so to address all the earlier posts with their 'send him to hell' sentiments.....

I stand by my analysis that this isn't the standard violent rape situation. We have an 18 year old boy presented with a 14 year old girl known as promiscuous who had discussed having sex with him and was engaged in foreplay. While I agree this is a situation of rape by definition there are many factors to consider when sentencing including the likelihood of re-offending and the recognition and remorse of the offender. Given that he admitted what he did and recognized his actions were wrong I do not have an issue with giving this young man a chance to get his life in order and be productive in society. Isn't the first goal of the justice system supposed to be rehabilitation?

I am not sure about the service at a rape center. I can see much benefit to him if he is open to learning and seeing the results of other instances of rape would most certainly open his eyes to the suffering his actions may have caused. I can also see benefit to some victims to see that it is possible for the rapist to have remorse and be rehabilitated and possibly even become an advocate for future victims. We constantly see drunk drivers and such giving lectures at schools on the error of their ways and why should this young man be any different if he embraces the opportunity to make positive change in his life and the lives of others.

To just toss him into jail for 20 years does not do anyone any good. It would make him worse, not better as a person and one being so young can still easily learn from his mistakes and change his ways and attitude. I think the 'throw away the key' attitude is quite uncalled for in this situation. It would be different if he was a repeat offender and had no remorse or understanding of his error.
 
QuebecCanadian
#30
She needs to be taken off rape cases!"The girl wasn't the victim she claims because she wasn't a virgin" What?? What year is this? Does no only really mean no if you've never had sex??? Grrrrrrrrr
 

Similar Threads

6
Judge orders maximum sentence
by #juan | Dec 12th, 2007
2
7/7 victim is a convicted rapist.
by Blackleaf | Nov 23rd, 2005
no new posts