Thatcher aide Lord McAlpine, who the Left falsely accused of being a paedophile, dies


Blackleaf
#1
A former aide to Margaret Thatcher, Lord McAlpine of West Green, has died aged 71.

He was today hailed as a 'towering' political figure who had been successful within and outside of public life.

In 2012 he was wrongly accused by the odious Left of being a paedophile, when allegations were the subject of a BBC investigation.

The allegations forced the corporation's then-director general, George Entwistle, to quit the role in November 2012 less than two months into taking it, saying that as editor-in chief he had to take 'ultimate responsibility' for a Newsnight investigation that had led to Lord McAlpine being wrongly accused of child abuse.

The BBC was also forced to apologise and issued a statement after abuse victim Steve Messham admitted that the man who abused him in the 1970s and 1980s was not the peer.

Lord McAlpine of West Green found himself at the centre of a storm of internet speculation after Mr Messham told BBC2's Newsnight he had been abused by a senior Conservative from the Thatcher era when he was a teenager at a north Wales children's home.

The Tory grandee later received damages from a string of internet users - including from left winger Sally Bercow, wife of Commons Speaker John Bercow, and QI star Alan Davies - as a result of the defamatory messages on Twitter.

Last year The Telegraph said: Since Mrs Bercow had tweeted “Why is Lord McAlpine trending? *innocent face*” at the height of the furore over (false) allegations aired by (BBC) Newsnight (that a senior Conservative had been involved in child abuse in the 1980s), this is a judgment (that it was defamatory) that for once is entirely consonant with common sense. There is a huge difference between “Why is Lord McAlpine trending?” and the same words with the addition of that faux-naive “*innocent face*”. To suggest otherwise defies credulity. Faux-naivety is the hallmark of the modern Left-wing smart alec (think BBC Radio 4’s The News Quiz). Only a Martian could fail to recognise the semantics of the form.

It was mentioned in court that legal proceedings defending his name could have been having a 'detrimental' effect on the peer's health.

In his political days Lord McAlpine was famous for throwing lavish parties on behalf of the Conservative party, and bringing in as much as £100million in donations.

Inner circle Tories would be presented with champagne and lobster at grand events during party conferences during Margaret Thatcher’s time as leader.

He was remembered for appearing in shabby corduroy suits and a salmon-and-cucumber-coloured Garrick Club tie, welcoming his guests.

But the loyal former Thatcher aide changed his tune after she was ousted by her party in November 1990, to be replaced with John Major. He accused the new Prime Minister of ‘stuffing up a great party’, of running away from every issue and living in a fantasy world. He also called him ‘distasteful’.


BREAKING NEWS: Senior Tory Lord McAlpine who was wrongly caught up in child abuse scandal has died in his Italian home at the age of 71


Lord McAlpine of West Green died peacefully last night, his family said

He was Conservative deputy chairman and an aide to Margaret Thatcher

The peer was the wrongful target of speculation connected to child abuse

By Kieran Corcoran
18January 2014
Daily Mail


'Peaceful death': Lord McAlpine's family announced that he had died at home

Former Conservative Party deputy chairman Lord McAlpine has died, his family has announced.

Lord McAlpine, 71, was previously an aide to Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher.

He died last night in Italy, his family said.

In a statement, they said: 'It is with great sadness that the family of Lord McAlpine announce his peaceful death last night at his home in Italy.'

The former political adviser and businessman was recently wrongly implicated in a child abuse scandal, when allegations were the subject of a BBC investigation.

He was today hailed as a 'towering' political figure who had been successful within and outside of public life.

The allegations forced the corporation's then-director general, George Entwistle, to quit the role in November 2012 less than two months into taking it, saying that as editor-in chief he had to take 'ultimate responsibility' for a Newsnight investigation that had led to Lord McAlpine being wrongly accused of child abuse.

The BBC was also forced to apologise and issued a statement after abuse victim Steve Messham admitted that the man who abused him in the 1970s and 1980s was not the peer.

Lord McAlpine of West Green found himself at the centre of a storm of internet speculation after Mr Messham told BBC2's Newsnight he had been abused by a senior Conservative from the Thatcher era when he was a teenager at a north Wales children's home.

The peer was wrongly accused by some of being a paedophile.


Senior Conservative: Lord McAlpine, pictured left in 1998 and right in 1979, rose to the rank of deputy party chairman


Remembrance: David Cameron tweeted in response to the news

Solicitors for Lord McAlpine indicated that they were preparing to sue for defamation, saying their client's reputation had been left in 'tatters' as a result of the programme.

An investigation into the programme by the BBC Trust later said members of the team failed to follow the corporation's own editorial guidelines.

The Tory grandee later received damages from a string of internet users - including Sally Bercow, wife of Commons Speaker John Bercow, and comedian Alan Davies - as a result of the defamatory messages on Twitter.

It was mentioned in court that legal proceedings defending his name could have been having a 'detrimental' effect on the peer's health.

During the hearing involving Mrs Bercow, Lord McAlpine's solicitor Andrew Reid said his client offered to settle months earlier ‘in an attempt to avoid the detrimental effect of litigation on his health’.


Court battle: Sally Bercow, wife of Commons Speaker John Bercow, pictured heading to the High Court, eventually withdrew her allegations and agreed to pay £15,000 in damages



Tweet: Sally Bercow was ordered to pay £15,000, which was donated to charity, after posting the above tweet


Ms Bercow agreed to pay Lord McAlpine £15,000 in damages for her infamous 'innocent face' tweet, which was posted at the height of the allegations.

The court also ruled that Mrs Bercow must apologise if she ever returned to Twitter. At present her account only has one post, which reads: 'I have apologised sincerely to Lord McAlpine in court – I hope others have learned tweeting can inflict real harm on people’s lives.’


QI star Alan Davies (left)

Actor, comedian and QI star Davies also paid damages after he retweeted a post to his followers which linked the peer's name to a television report about a 'senior political figure who is a paedophile'.

Prime Minister David Cameron said Lord McAlpine, whose death was confirmed today, was a 'dedicated supporter of Margaret Thatcher and the Conservative party'.

THE COLOURFUL POLITICAL LIFE OF LORD McALPINE


Colourful: Lord McAlpine pictured in 1994

In his political days Lord McAlpine was famous for throwing lavish parties on behalf of the Conservative party, and bringing in as much as £100million in donations.

Inner circle Tories would be presented with champagne and lobster at grand events during party conferences during Margaret Thatcher’s time as leader.

He was remembered for appearing in shabby corduroy suits and a salmon-and-cucumber-coloured Garrick Club tie, welcoming his guests.

But the loyal former Thatcher aide changed his tune after she was ousted by her party, to be replaced with John Major. He accused the new Prime Minister of ‘stuffing up a great party’, of running away from every issue and living in a fantasy world. He also called him ‘distasteful’.

But Mr Major shrugged off the barbs, once pointedly telling the Commons: ‘I understand that Lord McAlpine is promoting a book which is a work of fiction.’

Lord McAlpine stunned Westminster in 1996 by defecting to the Referendum Party, although he later returned to the Tories. In 2010 he stood down from the House of Lords to preserve his non-dom tax status.

Robert Alistair McAlpine, who had three daughters, was born in London on 14 May 1942.

His great grandfather was "Concrete Bob", Robert McAlpine, the first of the McAlpine baronets and the founder of the McAlpine construction firm. He is the second son of Ella Mary Gardner (Garnett) and Edwin McAlpine, the fifth Baronet, and the brother of William McAlpine, the sixth and current Baronet. He has described his childhood as "idyllic" but not luxurious. He went to boarding school at the age of six. He suffered from dyslexia and left Stowe School at 16. He then worked on a McAlpine building site on the South Bank, keeping time and dealing with wage packets.

McAlpine met Margaret Thatcher in 1975, the year she became the leader of the Conservative Party, at a dinner party, according to The Independent newspaper. She soon appointed him a treasurer of the Conservative Party, a position he would retain until 1990. They continued to have a close working relationship throughout her time as prime minister

He spent his final years living in Italy with third wife Athena, where they ran a bed and breakfast in a converted convent near Puglia.

He was also, in his time, a zoo-keeper, ornithologist, explorer and jewellery maker.



Read more: BREAKING NEWS: Senior Tory Lord McAlpine who was wrongly caught up in child abuse scandal has died in his Italian home at the age of 71 | Mail Online
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Last edited by Blackleaf; Jan 18th, 2014 at 08:23 AM..
 
Walter
+1
#2
Lefties just can't help themselves. Liberalism is a mental disorder.

Liberalism Is a Mental Disorder - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (external - login to view)
 
Cliffy
+1
#3
Left or right, political fanaticism is a mental illness?

Conservatism as a Mental Illness | Psychology Today (external - login to view)
 
Tecumsehsbones
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by CliffyView Post

Left or right, political fanaticism is a mental illness?

Conservatism as a Mental Illness | Psychology Today (external - login to view)

Nah, just common stupidity.

As for McAlpine, good thing the old pervert is dead.
 
Blackleaf
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by TecumsehsbonesView Post

Nah, just common stupidity.

As for McAlpine, good thing the old pervert is dead.

Oh dear. Tecumsehbones could become the latest non-thinking Lefty ordered to pay £15,000 for libel to the McAlpine family. Still, it'll be a good laugh.
 
lone wolf
#6
So.... What are your views on left-handedness? Try passing on the left. I bet in your part of the world, it's mostly a real bash!
 
Tecumsehsbones
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by BlackleafView Post

Oh dear. Tecumsehbones could become the latest non-thinking Lefty ordered to pay £15,000 for libel to the McAlpine family. Still, it'll be a good laugh.

Wrong, stupid. As a matter of law, one cannot libel the dead.

Nice try, though. Moron.
 
Cliffy
+1
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by BlackleafView Post

Oh dear. Tecumsehbones could become the latest non-thinking Lefty ordered to pay £15,000 for libel to the McAlpine family. Still, it'll be a good laugh.

I bet you didn't read the article on Conservatism as a Mental Illness.
 
Spade
#9
Dear Blackleaf,
Your avatar is wearing a brimless felt hat which in Latin is called a pileus.
What is it called in the Queen's English?
Remaining your correspondent,
Spade
 
Blackleaf
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by TecumsehsbonesView Post

Wrong, stupid. As a matter of law, one cannot libel the dead.

Nice try, though. Moron.


I'm sure William Gladstone's family - who sued a lawyer in 1927, 29 years after his death, for claiming that Gladstone liked to cavort with prostitutes - would disagree with you there.

Nice try, though, Lefty.

Quote: Originally Posted by SpadeView Post

Dear Blackleaf,
Your avatar is wearing a brimless felt hat which in Latin is called a pileus.
What is it called in the Queen's English?
Remaining your correspondent,
Spade


It's called a fez.

Quote: Originally Posted by CliffyView Post

I bet you didn't read the article on Conservatism as a Mental Illness.

No. Not really, I don't read silly things like that.
 
Walter
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by CliffyView Post

I bet you didn't read the article on Conservatism as a Mental Illness.

Please repost it, I'd like to read it.
 
Tecumsehsbones
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by BlackleafView Post

I'm sure William Gladstone's family - who sued a lawyer in 1927, 29 years after his death, for claiming that Gladstone liked to cavort with prostitutes - would disagree with you there.

Nice try, though, Lefty.

I'm sure you're a fool. And a liar. Peter Wilson wasn't a lawyer, and the Gladstone family did not sue him. He sued them.

But please, do continue to regale us with your knowledge of the law. And history.

One example is when the family of the former prime minister William Gladstone took exception to claims that he liked to cavort with prostitutes.

"One version was that he would sleep with them, another is that he would try to save them," says Mr Lamont.

Despite gossip about his unusual habits before his death in 1898, it was not until they were published in 1927 that action was taken. The family called author Peter Wright a liar, which caused him to sue them. Unable to prove the allegations, the writer lost the case - showing that even if you can't libel the dead you can still be provoked into a foolhardy defence of your own reputation.


(Bolding provided for the exceptionally stupid.)

BBC NEWS | UK | Magazine | Can you say anything about the dead? (external - login to view)
 
Blackleaf
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by TecumsehsbonesView Post

I'm sure you're a fool. And a liar. Peter Wilson wasn't a lawyer, and the Gladstone family did not sue him. He sued them.

But please, do continue to regale us with your knowledge of the law. And history.

One example is when the family of the former prime minister William Gladstone took exception to claims that he liked to cavort with prostitutes.

"One version was that he would sleep with them, another is that he would try to save them," says Mr Lamont.

Despite gossip about his unusual habits before his death in 1898, it was not until they were published in 1927 that action was taken. The family called author Peter Wright a liar, which caused him to sue them. Unable to prove the allegations, the writer lost the case - showing that even if you can't libel the dead you can still be provoked into a foolhardy defence of your own reputation.

(Bolding provided for the exceptionally stupid.)

BBC NEWS | UK | Magazine | Can you say anything about the dead? (external - login to view)


In English law you can be sued for libelling the dead.

A person can be sued for making libellous comments about a dead person if that person's family think it is having a detrimental effect on them. If McAlpine's family think such unfounded and libellous comments against him are having a detrimental effect on them or their construction business, then they are liable to sue.

So if I were you I wouldn't get too smug. I'd be careful what I say. You may be liable to be sued.
 
Tecumsehsbones
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by BlackleafView Post

In English law you can be sued for libelling the dead.

A person can be sued for making libellous comments about a dead person if that person's family think it is having a detrimental effect on them. If McAlpine's family think such unfounded and libellous comments against him are having a detrimental effect on them or their construction business, then they are liable to sue.

So if I were you I wouldn't get too smug. I'd be careful what I say. You may be liable to be sued.

Keep digging, fool.

" In England and Wales, the death of a claimant even a day before a libel action goes to court brings the action to a halt."
Scotland reassesses law on defamation of the dead | David Banks | Law | theguardian.com (external - login to view)

"The House of Commons has rejected an attempt to amend the Defamation Bill so as to allow relatives of dead people to sue over ‘libellous’ stories about their loved ones.

* * *

Justice minister Jonathan Djanogly said it was a long-established legal principle that a deceased person could not be defamed because reputation was personal.

“Relatives of the deceased also have no right of action, unless the words used reflect on their own reputations,” he said."
MPs rule that you still can't libel the dead - Journalism News from HoldtheFrontPage (external - login to view)

"One of the relevant factors is the cast-iron position that one cannot defame the dead."
You Can’t Defame the Dead – Why the Savile Case Shows Mr MacAskill Shouldn’t Change the Rules | Random Thoughts Re Scots Law by Paul McConville (external - login to view)


See where you are now, Blacklout? Wrong, ignorant, and rapidly on your way to stupid.

Sigh. I'm gonna waste some of my time on this fine bright (but cold) Sunday morning trying to help you, knowing the futility of it.

Let's start with the simple fact: you were wrong. You claimed that the family of Gladstone sued Peter Wilson for libel. That was just plain wrong. As I have proven, the family called Wilson a liar, and Wilson sued the family.

I went on to provide three references to the rule of English, Scottish, and American law that one cannot defame the dead. There are plenty more.

Now, you are faced with three choices.

1. You can fess up that you misunderstood the Gladstone case, admit that I'm right, and then say "You still have no business spreading lies about Lord McAlpine, Tecumsehsbones you miserable lefty twat." The sensible people here will easily forgive your misunderstanding (hell, happens to everybody once in a while) admire your willingness to admit when you're caught flatfooted, and agree with your statement to me.

2. You can continue to insist that the dead can be defamed in English law. And I'll keep proving they can't be, whilst you keep insisting, without references or authority, that they can be. And you'll look stupider and stupider.

3. You can run away.

I got a little bet with myself on which one you'll choose.
 
Tecumsehsbones
+3
#15  Top Rated Post
4 hours later. . .

Yep. Run, my little bunny. Run free.
 
Tecumsehsbones
#16
Nine hours later, Bunny is still running from his patently false statement.

Quote:

In English law you can be sued for libelling the dead.

Poor Bunny.
 
taxslave
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by TecumsehsbonesView Post

Nine hours later, Bunny is still running from his patently false statement.



Poor Bunny.

He is still looking in the bridish history books to find out how he could be so wrong Again.
 
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