Colonizing MARS


jjaycee98
#1
This will never get off the ground, unless it is a funded for profit endeavor. The current idea to be a one way mission will never happen. Unless it includes trying to return; what is the point?
 
Cliffy
+1
#2
I think it is a great idea. I think they should plan to send up millions of people. I will even volunteer to help load the ships.

Seriously, they want to do a test run to see if it is viable. A no return possible situation makes it really uninviting but still, people are volunteering to go. Go figure. But I won't miss them. The more the merrier.

I wonder if anyone has thought to ask the Martians what they think about humans polluting their planet.
 
petros
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by CliffyView Post


I wonder if anyone has thought to ask the Martians what they think about humans polluting their planet.

We are going there to steal the eludium pu36 space modulator from them.
 
Blackleaf
#4
The British and Chinese are going to be in the forefront of colonising Mars.

It will be British rovers and other technology sent to Mars on Chinese spaceships.
 
Kreskin
#5
American rovers have been there for decades.
 
karrie
+1
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by jjaycee98View Post

This will never get off the ground, unless it is a funded for profit endeavor. The current idea to be a one way mission will never happen. Unless it includes trying to return; what is the point?



When in history has colonizing somewhere included a plan to return the workers to their previous location?
 
eh1eh
+3
#7  Top Rated Post
Quote: Originally Posted by BlackleafView Post

The British and Chinese are going to be in the forefront of colonising Mars.

It will be British rovers and other technology sent to Mars on Chinese spaceships.

Wow. Britain exploiting an entire race of people to colonize someplace their invading.
What a great new idea.

Quote: Originally Posted by karrieView Post

When in history has colonizing somewhere included a plan to return the workers to their previous location?

Ya, the Chinese actually know all about that. Choo Choo.
 
Spade
+1
#8
The problem is extended travel in zero gravity. When they get to Mars and try to stand, the colonists will collapse into a puddle.
 
karrie
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by eh1ehView Post

Ya, the Chinese actually know all about that. Choo Choo.


One would kind of assume that Canadians know about that. I don't know a lot of Canadians who aren't here due to colonization. And the ones who would be here regardless, tend to be abundantly aware of the fact that colonists don't fracking leave.

Quote: Originally Posted by SpadeView Post

The problem is extended travel in zero gravity. When they get to Mars and try to stand, the colonists will collapse into a puddle.



It's not the skeletal muscles that are the true issue.... it's the heart.
 
WLDB
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by jjaycee98View Post

what is the point?

We never would have left the caves or come down from the trees if our distant ancestors thought that way.
 
Spade
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by karrieView Post

It's not the skeletal muscles that are the true issue.... it's the heart.

It's always the heart, Karrie.
 
WLDB
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by SpadeView Post

The problem is extended travel in zero gravity. When they get to Mars and try to stand, the colonists will collapse into a puddle.

Not likely. Crews on the international space station have stayed up there regularly for 6-12 months at a time before coming back to Earth. They were all fine. They have to exercise a hell of a lot to stay in shape up there but they can do it. The gravity on Mars is weaker than it is here so it would be easier for them to walk on Mars than it is for todays astronauts to walk here after a stint on the International Space Station.
 
Cliffy
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by WLDBView Post

Not likely. Crews on the international space station have stayed up there regularly for 6-12 months at a time before coming back to Earth. They were all fine. They have to exercise a hell of a lot to stay in shape up there but they can do it. The gravity on Mars is weaker than it is here so it would be easier for them to walk on Mars than it is for todays astronauts to walk here after a stint on the International Space Station.

I like the puddle theory better. It would make great TV. Kinda like the Martians heads exploding in their glass helmets in Mars Attacks.
Last edited by Cliffy; Jan 6th, 2014 at 07:00 PM..
 
Spade
+1
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by WLDBView Post

Not likely. Crews on the international space station have stayed up there regularly for 6-12 months at a time before coming back to Earth. They were all fine. They have to exercise a hell of a lot to stay in shape up there but they can do it. The gravity on Mars is weaker than it is here so it would be easier for them to walk on Mars than it is for todays astronauts to walk here after a stint on the International Space Station.

Darn!
Health Risks Pose Hurdle for Travel to Mars (external - login to view)
 
taxslave
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by BlackleafView Post

The British and Chinese are going to be in the forefront of colonising Mars.

It will be British rovers and other technology sent to Mars on Chinese spaceships.

Prince of darkness electric toys sent on made in china spaceships. That ot to go a long ways.
 
IdRatherBeSkiing
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by WLDBView Post

Not likely. Crews on the international space station have stayed up there regularly for 6-12 months at a time before coming back to Earth. They were all fine. They have to exercise a hell of a lot to stay in shape up there but they can do it. The gravity on Mars is weaker than it is here so it would be easier for them to walk on Mars than it is for todays astronauts to walk here after a stint on the International Space Station.

I would also assume that since the gravity is weaker, they can scale down the exercise proportionately. I think the issue may be the space required to exercise. The more space, the bigger ship, the more fuel it will take to move it.
 
Cliffy
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by IdRatherBeSkiingView Post

I would also assume that since the gravity is weaker, they can scale down the exercise proportionately. I think the issue may be the space required to exercise. The more space, the bigger ship, the more fuel it will take to move it.

People would have to in stasis in cryogenic pods to make the journey. We don't have the tech yet to pull that one off.
 
IdRatherBeSkiing
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by CliffyView Post

People would have to in stasis in cryogenic pods to make the journey. We don't have the tech yet to pull that one off.

We have the tech to put them there. We don't have the tech to revive them alive.
 
karrie
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by IdRatherBeSkiingView Post

I would also assume that since the gravity is weaker, they can scale down the exercise proportionately. I think the issue may be the space required to exercise. The more space, the bigger ship, the more fuel it will take to move it.





Exercise doesn't cut it. The longer you're in space, the more likely it is that gravity will stop your heart once you land, even if Mars has lighter gravity. There's a reason that when our guys land after space station missions of mere months, they're treated like babies. They get lifted out of the capsules, and they get carried away to medical care.


You simply can't recreate the strain of gravity for the circulatory system, no matter how much you exercise.
 
WLDB
+1
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by SpadeView Post

Darn!
Health Risks Pose Hurdle for Travel to Mars (external - login to view)

Of course there are health risks. Any spaceflight has that as a potential problem. The health risks they point out in this article aren't really any different from those serving on the ISS for a year at a time. The only major difference is they can escape the ISS if they have to. The Mars folks cant.

Quote: Originally Posted by karrieView Post

Exercise doesn't cut it. The longer you're in space, the more likely it is that gravity will stop your heart once you land, even if Mars has lighter gravity. There's a reason that when our guys land after space station missions of mere months, they're treated like babies. They get lifted out of the capsules, and they get carried away to medical care.


You simply can't recreate the strain of gravity for the circulatory system, no matter how much you exercise.

Plenty of people would still be willing to take the risk regardless. Space will never be risk free.
 
karrie
#21
The health risk is significantly different due to its duration. There is no point in trying to downplay it.


Like you say, people will take the risk anyway. It's been a short amount of time in terms of humanity's history, since people jumped aboard ships knowing it could mean their lives, and headed to North America in order to start a new life. It was an endeavour that never would have happened without us spending human lives to achieve it. Most human expansion has come at the expense of human lives. But it's served society well.
 
B00Mer
#22
Terraform Mars first then send people..

Terraforming Mars - YouTube

 
karrie
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by B00MerView Post

Terraform Mars first then send people..


I say if people want to go do the terraforming, let them. The equipment isn't ready yet, and the people are eager.
 
petros
#24
How many colons will they be sending?
 
spaminator
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by B00MerView Post

Terraform Mars first then send people..

Terraforming Mars - YouTube

terrorforming would be more likely to happen.

Quote: Originally Posted by jjaycee98View Post

Colonizing MARS

the martians are going to be pissed.
 
spaminator
#26
More than a thousand candidates shortlisted for life on Mars
REUTERS
First posted: Thursday, January 02, 2014 07:41 PM EST | Updated: Thursday, January 02, 2014 07:54 PM EST
AMSTERDAM - A mission to put humans on Mars that drew 200,000 applicants has selected more than a thousand candidates who will now be tested to come up with a final list of 24 would-be Mars-dwellers.
Mars One was set up in 2011 by two Dutch men with the goal of establishing permanent human life on Mars in 2025. They hope the project will be funded by investors and the rights from the documentary-***-reality TV broadcasting of the tests, training and final selection.
The 1,058 candidates who got through to the first round come from all over the world. By far the largest number - 297 - are American, followed by 75 Canadians and 62 Indians.
They must now undergo rigorous tests, including simulations of life on Mars and coping with isolation, co-founder Bas Lansdorp said.
"The challenge with 200,000 applicants is separating those who we feel are physically and mentally adept to become human ambassadors on Mars from those who are obviously taking the mission much less seriously," Lansdorp said.
Jacqueline Storey, a press officer at the National Maritime Museum, poses for a photograph in front of images of Mars generated by NASA's Curiosity Rover at their new Visions of the Universe exhibition, in Greenwich, London June 5, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Winning

More than a thousand candidates shortlisted for life on Mars | World | News | Toronto Sun (external - login to view)

Toronto man on shortlist for Mars colonization
By Kevin Connor ,Toronto Sun
First posted: Sunday, January 05, 2014 02:26 PM EST | Updated: Sunday, January 05, 2014 09:57 PM EST
Stephen Fenech is no reluctant astronaut, even though the trip he hopes to make will take him from Earth forever.
Toronto’s Fenech is now a one-percenter with the Mars One gang, a project with the goal of colonizing the fourth planet from the sun.
Mars One, a not-for-profit Netherlands-based organization behind the colonization effort, plans to make a reality TV show about the selection of the 40-person crew for the trip to the Red Planet.
Fenech said he welcomes the opportunity to participate in mankind’s first effort to sprawl across the galaxy — even though it is a one-way trip.
“I see the value in going. Our sun is getting brighter and some day it won’t support life. The only way to be prepared is to set out (to Mars) now. It’s a historic undertaking,” said Fenech, 45, who has travelled to 160 counties but never lost his childhood dream of leaving the planet.
The multibillion-dollar project — which attracted more than 200,000 applicants eager to become Martians — has just secured contracts with Lockheed Martin for the mission’s 2018 launch that will include a robotic lander and a communications satellite to start the settlement.
The 1,000 finalists will be cut to 40. That group will be sent to colonize Mars in 2023.
“We have taken some very big steps and it’s an exciting time,” Mars Once CEO Bas Lansdorp said from the company’s headquarters in the Netherlands.
He said fundraising for the 2018 launch is going well as about half of the $400,000 needed for the project’s first phase has been secured.
Aspects of the project are compelling, said Donna Frances, a research programmer with the Ontario Science Centre.
“In terms of the project’s feasibility ... it’s hard to know without them having assembled an idea for the rocket,” Frances said.
NASA has teams of engineers and scientists to accomplish such missions, but very few privately-funded companies have had success with an epic project because there is a lack of know-how, infrastructure and money.
“If NASA was to say ‘We are going to do it,’ we would say ‘OK’ and everyone would be excited,” Frances said.
“One thing that is interesting (with Mars One) is the reality show aspect. People would be able to see themselves in these astronauts and get into that dream, even if it is from afar. Mankind has a natural desire to explore. But are companies going to sponsor this on the chance it will happen?”
Fenech said that being an award-winning photographer and filmmaker helped him make the cut as he would be an asset in documenting the colonization of Mars.
Currently, he works in the control room at The Shopping Channel.
“My background in television could help with the reality show,” Fenech added.
This first round of finalists will now be put through a battery of medical and psychological tests, which are under wraps so no one can get an advantage, Lansdorp said.
There will also be group challenges to judge motivation and team skills.
Those selected to go to Mars will have to prove they have skills required to meet the needs of the colony, such as erecting solar panels and the construction of food-growing equipment — a vital component for producing oxygen.
Candidates will also be quizzed about leaving their loved ones behind.
“If I was in my 20s, I might have second thoughts. I almost got married two times, but it didn’t work out, so I would just be leaving may parents behind. Just because I wouldn’t physically be in the same space doesn’t mean I wouldn’t still be in touch with them,” Fenech said.
There were 297 U.S. candidates selected in this round of cuts and Canada had the second-highest number selected with 75.
“Canada had the highest number of applicants per capita. I don’t think it is a coincidence because they are descendents of explorers and they want to explore the final frontier,” Lansdorp said.
Fenech said he is aware there is a risk of going out in a bang when moving to another planet.
“I don’t mind being a guinea pig,” he added.
Steve Fenech, of Toronto, who is on the shortlist of candidates for a one-way expedition to Mars, seen Saturday, January 4, 2014. (Dave Thomas/Toronto Sun)

Toronto man on shortlist for Mars colonization | Toronto & GTA | News | Toronto Sun (external - login to view)
 
taxslave
+1
#27
MARS. The next prison colony.
 
tay
#28
Meet the Volunteers Willing to Go to Mars and Never Come Back








"Mars One Way (external - login to view)" documents the thought process of Cody Reeder, Casey Hunter, Will Robbins, Katelyn Kane, and Ken Sullivan. The five applicants all come from different backgrounds but have one similarity: they are more curious about life on Mars than attached to their current living situation on Earth.


The whole situation sounds as if it were lifted from a movie at best or an elaborate prank at worst. But it's all real life. Of the other volunteers profiled, a couple said they could change their mind. Hunter could be swayed away from the trip if he proposed to his girlfriend. Reeder said his girlfriend's telling him not to go might make him think otherwise.


That said, Hunter compares his life to that of a "turd in the toilet bowl of life. I just kind of float."






more


Meet the Volunteers Willing to Go to Mars and Never Come Back (external - login to view)
 
Liberalman
#29
It would be cheaper to set up a moon base first
 
coldstream
#30
The Space program was a product of the great optimism, prosperity and equity that followed WW2, an antidote to the Cold War's cynicism.

We live in much different times now, one of a collapsing culture, debasement of science (AGW, modern cosmology amongst other examples), economic decline, polarization of wealth, disassembly of consensus.

Imho.. a program of vision and enterprize on the scale of the Moon Mission would be impossible in the circumstances of the West now.
 

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