This Seems Pretty Sketchy


SLM
+1
#1  Top Rated Post
Stolen Enterprise rental Mustang has woman facing $47K bill

CBC – Thu, 2 Jan, 2014




What started as a fun getaway weekend has turned into a financial nightmare for a Dartmouth, N.S., woman who's now facing a huge bill she can't afford to pay.
It's all over a Ford Mustang that was stolen after she returned it to an Enterprise rental lot.
Back in October, Kristen Cockerill treated herself and her partner to a Mustang convertible for a day trip to the South Shore.
“It was nice. It was a Mustang GT convertible. Yeah, I don't know Mustangs the way that other people might, but it was a nice car,” she said.
At the end of the two-day rental, Cockerill returned the car to the Enterprise rental lot on Portland Street in Dartmouth.
She dropped the car off on a Sunday. Most Enterprise locations in the Halifax region are closed on Sundays and people who need to return vehicles that day are instructed to leave the key in a secure drop box.
The next day, Enterprise called Cockerill. The company had the keys, but no Mustang.
“I was pretty panicked, wondering where this car went, and actually went in to the shop that evening after work just to speak to [the clerk] in person and kind of find out what's happening here,” she said.
Police investigated and determined the vehicle was stolen. That appeared to be the end of it until Monday when Cockerill got a bill from Enterprise for $47,000, the replacement value of the Mustang.
Cockerill's insurer said the car wasn't in her control, so it shouldn't be her problem.
Enterprise, however, said that if her insurance doesn't cover it, they'll bill the $47,000 to the credit card she used to rent the Mustang. The charge won't go through, but it could cause her serious financial problems.
CBC News contacted Enterprise, which said it is working on a response to Cockerill's concerns.


Yahoo News Canada - Latest News & Headlines


Working on a response to her concerns? This is how they define a threat to charge her credit card $47,000.00?



This doesn't make any kind of sense.
 
Sal
#2
Half way through the article, I knew where it was going but I was still shocked. If they tell clients to drop cars off on a Sunday and there are no staff to prove that the car was dropped except for the keys they have in hand, the car company must have insurance to cover such losses mustn't they?
 
Goober
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by SalView Post

Half way through the article, I knew where it was going but I was still shocked. If they tell clients to drop cars off on a Sunday and there are no staff to prove that the car was dropped except for the keys they have in hand, the car company must have insurance to cover such losses mustn't they?

They should. Also stores in the area may have CCTV, you would think Enterprise would, so that may help.
Now I noted the date on the invoice so CCTV would be out.
 
Sal
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by GooberView Post

They should. Also stores in the area may have CCTV, you would think Enterprise would, so that may help.
Now I noted the date on the invoice so CCTV would be out.

it's just weird really to say she now has to pay for the car when she followed procedure...it makes one question if it's safe to rent and drop
 
Goober
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by SalView Post

it's just weird really to say she now has to pay for the car when she followed procedure...it makes one question if it's safe to rent and drop

They have corporate lawyers- go to court- get a judgment - lawyers are expensive - you cannot afford to pay- collection agency- life gets shxtty as they garnishee income.
And any funds placed into an RRSP/TFSA within 2 years past If I recall correctly is open for then to claim against.
 
Sal
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by GooberView Post

They have corporate lawyers- go to court- get a judgment - lawyers are expensive - you cannot afford to pay- collection agency- life gets shxtty as they garnishee income.
And any funds placed into an RRSP/TFSA within 2 years past If I recall correctly is open for then to claim against.



soooooo

what about consumer protection,
 
Goober
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by SalView Post



soooooo

what about consumer protection,

I really do not know. If I was her I would cancel the credit card- then I would monitor the Enterprise location on Sundays and video cars being returned as per their policy.
 
damngrumpy
#8
This is why i hate the whole rent a car thing if they have no one there and I always ask
I won't rent from them period. I had a problem with a car rental a number of years ago.
it was at night when I arrived in NS and the static I got left me renting a cab as it were
to go to Annapolis Valley. My company I represented rented the car so they wanted
the person on the phone to sign but they were four thousand miles away. If that was
not possible I would use my card and they would do this and that. So I told them to
shove it and took a cab. It ended up be cheaper in the long run there and back and I
didn't need a car during the meetings anyway.
If I was this woman I would fight any attempt to charge me for their problem of not
having someone there to retrieve the car
 
IdRatherBeSkiing
#9
I am not sure what the issue is unless she has a credit limit of over $47K. I will expect a big DECLINED will appear on their credit card screen and that will be the end of it. She could also report her credit card stolen or lost.

Enterprise would have to take her to court and I don't think they would have a leg to stand on.
 
Sal
+1
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by GooberView Post

I really do not know. If I was her I would cancel the credit card- then I would monitor the Enterprise location on Sundays and video cars being returned as per their policy.

over 40 grand, it's a travesty of justice...maybe a pro bono lawyer who likes to take on business...really there is no way to prove one has dropped the car other than the keys...I used to drop my car off at my mechanics and shoot the keys through a little hole in the garage door, if my car had been stolen who could have proven it was even there...never really considered that before.
 
IdRatherBeSkiing
+1
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by SalView Post

over 40 grand, it's a travesty of justice...maybe a pro bono lawyer who likes to take on business...really there is no way to prove one has dropped the car other than the keys...I used to drop my car off at my mechanics and shoot the keys through a little hole in the garage door, if my car had been stolen who could have proven it was even there...never really considered that before.

I guess a nice date stamped photo in a enterprise lot would be helpful.

I never return on Sunday. They charge you until Monday anyways. No plus side for a Sunday return aside from convenience.
 
Sal
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by IdRatherBeSkiingView Post

I guess a nice date stamped photo in a enterprise lot would be helpful.

I never return on Sunday. They charge you until Monday anyways. No plus side for a Sunday return aside from convenience.

Yeah, I never considered it before. Not cool.
 
Goober
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by SalView Post

Yeah, I never considered it before. Not cool.

And neither would most people- I never would have considered this happening.
I wonder how many were charged for damages to the car that may not have existed when they returned the car to a public place- It does happen.
 
SLM
#14
I find the whole thing kind of a scary notion. I'm wondering how many people have returned rented vehicles after hours and just dropped the keys through the slot? My guess would be many.
 
damngrumpy
#15
As I say I've always been uneasy about returning a vehicle without anyone being there.
Anyone could steal the car from a random act to a dishonest employee and like someone
mentioned aside from keys who can prove anything.
 
taxslave
#16
It would seem to me that if Enterprise put the cost of the car on her credit card without her approval would constitute fraud.
 
Dixie Cup
#17
I have rented cars on many occasions and have never had to "drop" the keys anywhere. There's always someone that's been there. I suppose it must depend on where you rent the vehicle (i.e. smaller locations) that don't have someone there. But it sure is an eye-opener - I wouldn't have given it much thought before - now, I will keep it in mind should the situation ever arise. Hokey Smokes!!
 
Cannuck
#18
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslaveView Post

It would seem to me that if Enterprise put the cost of the car on her credit card without her approval would constitute fraud.

If you the fine print in the contract, she allowed them to do just that.
 
jjaycee98
+1
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by SLMView Post

Stolen Enterprise rental Mustang has woman facing $47K bill

CBC – Thu, 2 Jan, 2014




What started as a fun getaway weekend has turned into a financial nightmare for a Dartmouth, N.S., woman who's now facing a huge bill she can't afford to pay.
It's all over a Ford Mustang that was stolen after she returned it to an Enterprise rental lot.
Back in October, Kristen Cockerill treated herself and her partner to a Mustang convertible for a day trip to the South Shore.
“It was nice. It was a Mustang GT convertible. Yeah, I don't know Mustangs the way that other people might, but it was a nice car,” she said.
At the end of the two-day rental, Cockerill returned the car to the Enterprise rental lot on Portland Street in Dartmouth.
She dropped the car off on a Sunday. Most Enterprise locations in the Halifax region are closed on Sundays and people who need to return vehicles that day are instructed to leave the key in a secure drop box.
The next day, Enterprise called Cockerill. The company had the keys, but no Mustang.
“I was pretty panicked, wondering where this car went, and actually went in to the shop that evening after work just to speak to [the clerk] in person and kind of find out what's happening here,” she said.
Police investigated and determined the vehicle was stolen. That appeared to be the end of it until Monday when Cockerill got a bill from Enterprise for $47,000, the replacement value of the Mustang.
Cockerill's insurer said the car wasn't in her control, so it shouldn't be her problem.
Enterprise, however, said that if her insurance doesn't cover it, they'll bill the $47,000 to the credit card she used to rent the Mustang. The charge won't go through, but it could cause her serious financial problems.
CBC News contacted Enterprise, which said it is working on a response to Cockerill's concerns.


Yahoo News Canada - Latest News & Headlines


Working on a response to her concerns? This is how they define a threat to charge her credit card $47,000.00?



This doesn't make any kind of sense.

I think the central factor here is that the keys were dropped in their "Secure Drop" and they have said that they have the keys. It is fact of law-"You can not be held responsible for someone else's illegal act". Unless they can prove that she allowed someone to abscond with the vehicle they have no case.


Keys for new vehicles are not easy come by and can not be copied at the local hardware store. Duplicate keys or replacements have to be ordered through a dealer and supplied by the Manufacturer. Given the time they had the vehicle this would be impossible. The other option is that it could be an inside job.
 
taxslave
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by CannuckView Post

If you the fine print in the contract, she allowed them to do just that.

The fine print says they can bill her for damages SHE caused to the vehicle. Not what happened to it after it was returned.
 
bill barilko
#21
Unlike the borderline hysterical posters here I've rented from Enterprise for over 8 years now it says in the contract-which I have read over many many times and on the drop box-that the renter is responsible until Enterprise takes physical control of the keys and that dropping them in the box isn't control.

Also the idea that you can just cancel a CC because you don't like what's been charged to it is more abject nonsense-as is the assertion that if you drop a car off @ a closed location on Sunday you're charged for that day-absolute poppycock.

I'm lucky in that I live close to a small Enterprise location so I can just return the car the next AM quickly and be on my way-that's why I rarely use the drop box option to my mind it's not a secure enough option so I've only used it once AFAIR.

This woman's CC was mistakenly charged and Enterprise will come good for it but since the organisation has become more & more corporate this is the sort of thing that happens-the world isn't a friendly place for consumers.
 
Cannuck
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslaveView Post

The fine print says they can bill her for damages SHE caused to the vehicle. Not what happened to it after it was returned.

It wasn't returned...according to the contract
 
Goober
#23
https://www.nationalcar.ca/printTC.do
Last edited by Goober; Jan 4th, 2014 at 06:07 PM..
 
bill barilko
#24
Quote: Originally Posted by GooberView Post

https://www.nationalcar.ca/printTC.do

National is not Enterprise.
 
Goober
#25
Quote: Originally Posted by bill barilkoView Post

National is not Enterprise.

Check to see who owns what.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enterprise_Holdings
 
Goober
+1
#26
Love the public pressure.
Kristen Cockerill won't have to pay for stolen $47K rental car - Nova Scotia - CBC News
 
karrie
#27
Sounds like an issue of insurance company versus insurance company. If it was in HER care and control, her insurance covers it (usually via her VISA). Let them battle it out, not her problem.

Quote: Originally Posted by GooberView Post

Love the public pressure.
Kristen Cockerill won't have to pay for stolen $47K rental car - Nova Scotia - CBC News



Hmmm, she still gets her insurance dinged in the end. That doesn't seem right to me.
 

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