U.S. soldier kills up to 16 Afghan civilians


EagleSmack
+1
#601
Quote: Originally Posted by Ocean BreezeView Post




It has been too late for that for some time. It was one of the most stupid slogans to come out of washington anyhow.

Winning the hearts and minds of a population of a different culture , in a far off land by invading and warring on it. No rational being would swallow that Bull crap. Only an idiot would say it out loud.

Honestly... you'd think that Canadians were not involved at all be the way Breezy talks.
 
Cliffy
+1
#602
Quote: Originally Posted by EagleSmackView Post

Honestly... you'd think that Canadians were not involved at all be the way Breezy talks.

That is cuz we got Bush Lite at the helm. I bet this gives Colpy a woody.
 
petros
+1
#603
Army sergeant to be charged in Afghan killings

By LOLITA C. BALDOR, Associated Press–34 minutes ago

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. military intends to tell Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales Friday he faces 17 counts of murder and six counts of attempted murder, along with other charges, in connection with a shooting rampage in two southern Afghanistan villages that shocked Americans back home and further roiled U.S.-Afghan relations.

The charges come almost two weeks after the massacre in which Bales allegedly left his base in the early morning hours and shot Afghans, including women and nine children, while they slept in their beds, then burned some of the bodies.

Bales will be read the charges on Friday at the military prison at Fort Leavenworth, Kan., where he has been held since being flown from Afghanistan last week, a U.S. official said.

Bales' civilian attorney, John Henry Browne, said Friday without commenting on the specific charges that he believes the government will have a hard time proving its case and that at some stage in the prosecution his client's mental state will be an important issue.

In addition to murder and attempted murder, the charges will include six counts of aggravated assault as well as a number of other violations of military law, said the official, who spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss the charges before they were announced.

The 38-year-old soldier and father of two, who lives in Lake Tapps, Wash., faces trial under the Uniform Code of Military Justice, but it could be months before any public hearing.

Legal jurisdiction in the Bales case is expected to be switched Friday from U.S. Forces-Afghanistan in Kabul to Bales' home base of Joint Base Lewis-McChord near Tacoma, Wash., U.S. officials said.

Defense Secretary Leon Panetta has said Bales could face the death penalty if he is convicted of murder, but it is unlikely. The U.S. military has not executed a service member since 1961. Legal experts say Bales could face a lengthy prison sentence if convicted.
The attorney said Friday on CBS' "This Morning" that he spent 11 hours this week with Bales at Leavenworth and found him to be shocked by the accusations against him.

"He has some memories about what happened before the alleged events and some memories after the alleged events and some windows here and there into things, but he really doesn't have any memory," Browne said. "My meetings with him clearly indicate to me that he's got memory problems that go back long before that."

Browne said Bales had earlier suffered a "concussive injury which is serious" and that it was "not treated for a variety of reasons," which Browne did not explain.

Browne said his reaction to the government's allegations is: "Prove it." He said he believes the government will have difficulty proving its case because "there is no crime scene" and a lack of important physical evidence like fingerprints.

Military authorities had originally said Bales was suspected in the killing of 16 Afghan villagers, nine children and seven adults. They changed that Thursday to 17, raising the number of adults by one but without explaining how the change came about. It's possible some of the dead were buried before U.S. military officials arrived at the scene of the carnage. Six Afghans were wounded in the attack.
The slaughter of Afghan villagers was yet another blow to U.S-Afghan relations. It followed a series of missteps, including the mistaken burning of Qurans, which prompted violent protests and revenge killings of American troops in the war zone.

The killings also prompted renewed debate in the United States about health care for the troops, who have experienced record suicide rates and high rates of post-traumatic stress and brain injuries during repeated deployments over a decade of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Bales was on his fourth tour of duty in a war zone, having served three tours in Iraq, where he suffered a head injury and a foot injury. He was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 3rd Infantry Regiment of the 3rd Stryker Brigade Combat Team, of the 2nd Infantry Division, which is based at Joint Base Lewis-McChord.

Browne has portrayed his client as a patriot, loving father and devoted husband who had been traumatized by a comrade's injury and sent into combat one too many times.

But there have been conflicting reports about what exactly Bales saw relating to the comrade's injury. A U.S. defense official said that while it is likely that a soldier from Bales' unit, based in the Panjwai district of Kandahar province in southern Afghanistan, suffered a leg wound a day or two before the March 11 shootings, there is no evidence that Bales witnessed it or the aftermath, or that it played any role in his alleged actions.

The official spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss an internal review.

Afghan officials have asked the United States for some role in the criminal proceedings, perhaps as observers, and to be kept up to date on the case. The government of Afghan President Hamid Karzai has not demanded that Bales be turned over to the Afghan justice system, although some in the country's parliament did. The Afghans have also urged a fast resolution of the case.

Army officials have said Bales was cleared for return to duty after the head injury he suffered in Iraq.

Bales joined the Army in 2001 after a Florida investment business failed and after he had worked with a string of securities operations. Bales and a broker at one company were hit in 2003 with a $1.5 million arbitration ruling after an elderly couple charged that their holdings were decimated.

He also was arrested in 2002 for the drunken assault of a casino security guard and had to complete an anger management class. There also are reports of a second incident involving alcohol, although Bales was never formally charged.

A sheriff's department report released Thursday says Robert Bales was accused in 2008 in Washington state of shaking hands with a woman, pulling her hand into his crotch and then punching and kicking her boyfriend. It described Bales as "extremely intoxicated."
Associated Press writers Robert Burns in Washington and Mike Baker and Manuel Valdes in Olympia, Wash., contributed to this report.
Copyright © 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.
 
Spade
#604
Quote: Originally Posted by CliffyView Post

That is cuz we got Bush Lite at the helm. I bet this gives Colpy a woody.

Amen!
 
Ocean Breeze
#605
Quote:

Click to view this newsletter in a browser (external - login to view) | Breaking news (external - login to view)
Breaking news


BREAKING NEWS ALERT
US soldier charged with 17 counts of premeditated murder in Afghan shootings, could face death penalty - NBC News (external - login to view)

well, that is a start. How the US handles this hot potato is being watched world wide and could make/ break relationships on multi levels. Technically this is an INTERNATIONAL CRIME..

***********
Eagle: of course Canada was involved. Fortunately , to date it seems to have handled itself a lot more responsibly and professionally. If one of the Canadian soldiers went off half cocked and did what this bloke did......the condemnation would be loud and furious. Don't ever underestimate the power of Canadians when it comes to condemning atrocities. There are STANDARDS to be maintained . What folks forget .......that even in an elective invasion.....,that the troops are representing the nation they come from. In that sense they are embassadors . Seems the area where this slaughter happened was near one that Canadian troops had worked hard to bring back into some semblance of normality for the people there. No one is saying that they are perfect. One more thing that is different is that Canada does not have the same degree of "hero worship: or "troops worship" and rightly so. It is one profession of many that young people choose. Respect:: YES. Worship:: NO. Not anymore than Canadians worship first class surgeons that save lives on a daily basis... Moderation is imperative, as things get out of balance far too quickly

This latest atrocity adds another big black mark against the US .....its "image" , its reputation, the misbehavior of its troops. This is not the first and will not be the last. Unless......these wars of choice are terminated . They have left the target nations destroyed, demoralized and hating the US ........when the delusional US thought it would be greeted with garlands of flowers. That stupid comment is one for the history books. Under the appropriate category.
Last edited by Ocean Breeze; Mar 23rd, 2012 at 03:28 PM..
 
lone wolf
#606
Sure.... Our government would over-react and disband something - rather than fix it
 
Ocean Breeze
#607
Quote:

Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales has been charged with 17 counts of premeditated murder and could face the death penalty, the U.S. military says.



He also faces six counts of assault and attempted murder. Bales, 38, stands accused of leaving a remote outpost in Afghanistan's Kandahar province on March 11 and going on a deadly house-to-house rampage, gunning down civilians.



He was returned to the United States last week and is being held at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas.

Source: CNN breaking news mailing.

Glad to see the word PREMEDITATED in the charges. Suspect every word and detail will be scrutenized now.
 
EagleSmack
+2
#608
Quote: Originally Posted by Ocean BreezeView Post


. They have left the target nations destroyed, demoralized and hating the US ........when the delusional US thought it would be greeted with garlands of flowers. That stupid comment is one for the history books. Under the appropriate category.

Not anymore stupid to think we thought we'd be greeted with flowers and garlands. Now THAT is a stupid comment.

Are you heading to Libya to help clean up?
 
CDNBear
+4
#609
Quote: Originally Posted by CliffyView Post

That is cuz we got Bush Lite at the helm.

Bush is a middle left Democrat?

Quote:

I bet this gives Colpy a woody.

If we're talking about your comparison, it will give him a chuckle. If you're talking about the murders, knowing Colpy as I do, he finds it repugnant.
 
lone wolf
+2
#610
Quote: Originally Posted by Ocean BreezeView Post

Source: CNN breaking news mailing.

Glad to see the word PREMEDITATED in the charges. Suspect every word and detail will be scrutenized now.

Premeditated is even harder to prove in Court....

Don't take my word for it. Look it up
 
Goober
+1 / -1
#611
[QUOTE=Ocean Breeze;1564618]well, that is a start. How the US handles this hot potato is being watched world wide and could make/ break relationships on multi levels. Technically this is an INTERNATIONAL CRIME..

***********

Quote:

]Not anymore than Canadians worship first class surgeons that save lives on a daily basis... Moderation is imperative, as things get out of balance far too quickly


And do you consider yourself to be moderate?

A Vet’s Perspective on the Afghan Massacre | TIME Ideas | TIME.com (external - login to view)

When I read about Staff Sergeant Robert Bales’ alleged massacre in Panjwai, just a few kilometers from that firefight, I thought about that little girl. I wonder how any grown man — an American soldier nonetheless — could stare down 11 children and even consider pulling a trigger. It pains me to think that perhaps even some of the children I helped in Kandahar would have been among the victims. My heart fills with hate toward this man, as do most Americans’.

But our generation of fighters is lucky enough to live in a society that is at least tolerant of our service members, if not passionately enthusiastic about us. Our military has had several soldiers engage in inhumane acts in combat over the past decade. But for the most part, our culture understands that these isolated incidents don’t represent the 99% of soldiers who are good-hearted people that have served honorably. And if we solely analyze this as an issue of character, then of course I wholeheartedly agree. But the problem is that this incident, and the ones that may occur in the future, are not simply issues of character, but of post-traumatic stress. And through this lens, I fear the “isolated incident” argument may leave several soldiers neglected.

Since I came home from Afghanistan, I’ve personally struggled through life-altering post-traumatic stress. I went through phases of nightmares, severe temper problems and antisocial behavior. I distanced myself from my parents and neglected my health. My outlook on life became cynical and toxic. I was an angry person to be around. And I did only one tour. More important, I’ve had plenty of time to realign my life, and I’m finally taking better care of myself. Had I stayed on the traditional Army career path, I would have been back on a plane to Afghanistan a few months ago, undoing months of progress and deepening the crevices in my emotional life.

Robert Bales was on his fourth tour in combat. I know the gravity of this commitment does not register with most people. It’s not simply a “one year on, one year off” arrangement. When you come home, some units get 30 days leave; some units in 3rd Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division (Bales’ unit) received only two weeks when they came home in 2010 according to a colleague who served in Iraq with them. When work starts again, NCOs like Bales show up to their American posts between 5:30 and 6:00 a.m. Then come the battalion field exercises and brigade field exercises that each require weeks of training away from home. Then most units will spend a month at Fort Irwin, Calif., or Fort Polk, La., for a final pre-deployment exercise. That whole “one-year off” is not much of a break for any soldier or their families. With so much time away from home and focused on war, spouses leave, children suffer and mental health deteriorates.
 
Ocean Breeze
#612
Quote:

Afghan Witnesses Say Sgt. Robert Bales Did Not Act Alone (external - login to view)

Afghan Witnesses Say Sgt. Robert Bales Did Not Act Alone -- News from Antiwar.com (external - login to view)
 
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