Tory quietly axes student job centres


mentalfloss
#1
Human Resources Minister quietly axes student job centres

The employment centres for students that have opened every spring for more than four decades in communities across Canada have been cancelled by the federal Human Resources department, which says it can offer the same services online.

The centres began as a Hire-a-Student pilot project in Moose Jaw, Sask. in 1968 and quickly spread to other regions. But the government says they have seen their attendance dwindle in recent years as increasing numbers of young people turn to their computers to find employment between April and September.

The Human Resources department is also under pressure to trim costs as the government grapples with a multi-billion-dollar deficit. The elimination of the centres will save Ottawa about $6.5-million a year.

Human Resources Minister Diane Finley did not actually announce the demise of the network of offices that are now known as Service Canada Centres for Youth. Rather, in a news release issued Jan. 27 , she said her department would be enhancing the tools that young people need to entre the workforce.

Canadian youth have asked for better online access to employment services and the government is responding by bolstering the website Youth.gc.ca (external - login to view) with resources such as tips on writing résumés and cover letters, Ms. Finley explained. The site also includes a link to the online job bank for students.

When asked about the decision to close the centres, the department said the centres had lost their relevance and young Canadians will still be able to receive assistance in person, all year long, through existing Service Canada locations.

But Roxanne Dubois, national chair of the Canadian Federation of Students, said the move is troubling. The youth unemployment rate of 14.5 per cent is nearly twice that of the general population, said Ms. Dubois. At the same time, she said, students are facing high tuition fees and, in many cases, large debts.

“This is not a time to cut back resources to unemployed youth,” Ms. Dubois said. “It is actually a time to invest resources and make sure that, not only are we creating new job opportunities for young Canadians, but we are also providing the services they need to know what those jobs are and to have access to them.”

Jean Crowder, the human resources critic for the federal New Democrats, said the reality is that not all young Canadians have ready access to high-speed internet. And the student jobs centres, she said, helped young people learn how to sell themselves to employers.

“Online is fine and dandy but you don’t have that kind of interaction,” Ms. Crowder said.

Rodger Cuzner, the Liberal human resources critic pointed out that the Conservatives tried unsuccessfully a couple of years ago to end the student summer jobs program by backed away from that plan after a public outcry. “The closure of these offices will hurt students and business operators, especially in seasonal industries,” he said.

Meanwhile, the student job bank, like the main job bank run by Service Canada, has been offline for more than two weeks as a result of a security breach.

When questioned about the outage by Ms. Crowder in the House of Commons on Tuesday, Ms. Finley said: “I can assure you that HRSD are working around the clock so that we can get the job bank back up and running in a secure way just as quickly as possible.”


Human Resources Minister quietly axes student job centres - The Globe and Mail
 
wulfie68
+2
#2  Top Rated Post
I can't speak with authority for all regions, but in Alberta, they aren't utilized that much. Large companies go to post secondary institutions and advertise about upcoming summer employment through the career centers in the institutions. That includes forestry companies looking for tree planters, etc. Smaller companies tend to advertise via papers and word of mouth. If the situation is similar in other regions, it just highlights the redundancy and thus lack of need.
 
mentalfloss
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by wulfie68View Post

Smaller companies tend to advertise via papers and word of mouth. If the situation is similar in other regions, it just highlights the redundancy and thus lack of need.

Well apparently you need to do a bit more whiz-logic to show a lack of need...


As The Globe and Mail's Gloria Galloway reports today, Ms. Finley quietly scrapped the centres, at a saving of $6.5-million a year.

For its part, Ms. Finley's department says young people are turning more to their computers to find summer jobs, and it has enhanced its online tools. And it does have its Service Canada outlets.

But the Service Canada Centres for Youth are gone.

I get what Ms. Finley is saying about online access, but it's not the same, particularly in this era of uncertainty.

So I did Ms. Finley what I hope is a favour, and dug up some data for her perusal:

  • The unemployment rate among our youth, defined by Statistics Canada as between the ages of 15 and 24, has certainly dipped from its peak, but stood in January at 14.5 per cent, up from December and compared to a national rate of 7.6 per cent. While youth unemployment will top the national average, it's up from 10.8 per cent in September 2008, before the crisis set in, while national jobless levels were at 6.1 per cent.
  • Jobless youths now number 412,000, compared to 321,000 in September 2008.
  • Employed youths now number 2.4 million, compared to 2.6 million.
  • The employment rate has declined to 54.7 from 60.3.
  • The participation rate has declined to 63.9 from 67.7.

So, yeah, young people are more than adept at navigating job sites and the like. But what we need from this government is a concerted, well thought-out effort to get our kids working. It could have kept the centres running, and improved online resources as well.

 
petros
#4
How many years has HR been posting jobs online? The young Human Resources are pretty good with the innernet these days.
 
mentalfloss
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by petrosView Post

How many years has HR been posting jobs online? The young Human Resources are pretty good with the innernet these days.

I know plenty of students who went to a university center that got them a job they would have otherwise had no clue existed. These people are now well-entrenched in the workforce. This kind of austerity does not have any substantial effect on the economy - and can actually create fewer jobs.
 
petros
#6
SaskJobs.ca - Real Careers. Real Life. (external - login to view) There are big orange sunshines indicating student summer job postings. No extra cost for the young Human Resources to figure everything out.
 
mentalfloss
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by petrosView Post

SaskJobs.ca - Real Careers. Real Life. (external - login to view) There are big orange sunshines indicating student summer job postings. No extra cost for the young Human Resources to figure everything out.

Someone needs to remind you that Saskatchewan is not Canada.
 
petros
+1
#8
HRDC isn't a Fed operation? Anyone from Canada can come and get one of the near 10,000 jobs on that HRDC Saskjobs website.

60,000 jobs in 4 years and still 10K young and mature, experienced Human Resources still needed.

Get on the bus Gus.

Things are so bad, we even hire the Irish .



www.servicecanada.gc.ca/eng/e...ms/scpp.shtml/ (external - login to view)
 
L Gilbert
+2
#9
The fed HR student center near here has an average of 3 students per day. How much does it cost to run one? $8600 a month here not including wages of fed employees.
In the meantime there are online job services like workopolis.com, monster.ca, find-a-job-canada.com, working.com, etc. besides the federal site.
 
earth_as_one
#10
I agree with the change, but they shouldn't have cut the program without replacing it with an online version.
 
captain morgan
+1
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by earth_as_oneView Post

I agree with the change, but they shouldn't have cut the program without replacing it with an online version.


It would still be far more effective for the program to be outsourced to Monster or workopolis and have them incorporate a section specifically for youth
 
petros
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by earth_as_oneView Post

I agree with the change, but they shouldn't have cut the program without replacing it with an online version.

It was replaced aeons ago.
 
mentalfloss
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by L GilbertView Post

The fed HR student center near here has an average of 3 students per day. How much does it cost to run one? $8600 a month here not including wages of fed employees.

$8,600.00 a month for 90 jobs a month on that site alone is pretty damn good value.
 
petros
+1
#14
60 students per month (20 biz days in a month) visiting not necessarily getting work
 
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