We are all responsible for the plight of Canada’s first nations


dumpthemonarchy
#1
If Canadains are responsible, then I vote to make aboriginals regular Canadians and let them have property rights, just like us to make up for the big mess that is run by the govt. End all silly talk of them being "nations" as they get billions every year. And don't give another penny to chiefs. Give them exactly what is stated in treaties, then end the treaties.

We are all responsible for the plight of Canada’s first nations - The Globe and Mail



We are all responsible for the plight of Canada’s first nations

ken coates AND greg poelzer

Globe and Mail Update

Published Friday, Feb. 17, 2012 8:33AM EST

Last updated Friday, Feb. 17, 2012 8:37AM EST

147 comments

There has been movement – real movement – on the aboriginal file. While signs of despair are abundant, Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s apology, on behalf of all Canadians, about Indian residential schools was a major step toward reconciliation. This month, the release of major report on the management and funding of first-nations education, represented a significant response to the most fundamental challenge facing aboriginal communities, namely underperformance in school. As all participants, governments and aboriginal leaders alike, will quickly agree that it is not enough. The problem: There is no consensus about what to do next.

Video

Will Harper show First Nations chiefs the money?


Canadians are well aware of the issues facing aboriginals. Who is not moved by news of the housing and living conditions in many of this country’s remote aboriginal communities? They would be even more upset and angry if they realized the full extent of story: that there are dozens of Attawapiskats and Kashechewans across the country, that the systemic unemployment is so widespread as to engender despair among even the most optimistic community developer, and that the silent scourge of aboriginal life in Canada – fetal alcohol syndrome and fetal alcohol effects – is erecting a formidable barrier against attempts at meaningful change.

The country is, however, strongly divided about what to do about the first-nations issues. Opinion falls neatly into two camps. Most first-nations leaders and many non-aboriginal Canadians say that responsibility lies with the government of Canada. Ottawa, after all, created the Indian Act, residential schools, and the reserve system and, therefore, the cultures of dependency and despair that characterize first-nations communities. Having created the mess, the argument goes, they should move quickly and forcefully to repair the damage, providing equality of opportunity if not equality of circumstance, and to remove the blight on the nation’s good character.

The opposing view is just as strongly presented. The problem, it is said, lies with the first nations themselves. They need to root out corrupt politicians, abandon uneconomical reserves for towns and cities, reject further reliance on government “handouts,” and free themselves and the country from the unsustainable dependence on the Government of Canada. Some go so far as to promote the elimination of “special” Indian status; most stop short of that unrealistic idea and argue that First Nations have to take responsibility for the future of their communities. But culpability in this formulation clearly rests with First Nations leaders and their governments.

They are both wrong – and pursuing these lines between government and first-nations responsibility will only continue to divide first nations from other Canadians, ossify policy and community development, and ensure that, 20 years from now, we will still be worrying about the same problems and struggling to address the challenges of the same hurting communities. But if the problem is not “owned” primarily by either the government of Canada or the first nations, who then is responsible for dealing with what many observers believe to be insurmountable problems?

The answer is simple: We are. Canadians as a whole have to take ownership of the challenges facing first-nations communities. First nations have to do their part, to be sure, and effective and transparent government is essential. The government of Canada (with more co-ordination with the provinces) must be actively involved, as a funder and policy-maker, with appropriate support for education and community health being among the most urgent priorities. But if the country is to ever to transform the first-nations debate and move it in productive and meaningful ways, the country as a whole must take part. Our single greatest national challenge can only be tackled as a nation-wide movement of the highest priority. As a child, more than one of our teachers used to say that if you pointed a finger at someone, you had three fingers pointing back at you. So it is with aboriginal issues in Canada.

If Canadians really want change – and we known that the overwhelming majority want dramatic improvement in aboriginal
circumstances – then the paradigm has to shift. We need business leaders to step forward and commit to working with first nations to create sustainable economies – as some, like former prime minister Paul Martin, are already doing to good effect. We need civil servants and private-sector managers to serve as mentors to first nations administrators struggling with unbelievable pressures and challenges. The country needs trade unions to take the lead on creating new and safer places for aboriginal people in the work force and cultural groups to provide additional opportunities to celebrate Indigenous cultural contributions.

The churches, gun-shy beyond belief by the fallout from the residential school system, need to rediscover the social gospel ethic that made the mainline churches in this country among the most creative and energetic in the industrial world. The churches need to commit themselves, congregation by congregation, to rebuilding indigenous communities in need. Canadian service clubs and not-for-profit organizations need to work with first nations and other groups to broaden the range of services and facilities available in remote communities. Young people from across the country need to leave their urban comfort zones and commit themselves to working in remote and isolated communities.

Canada needs colleges and universities to make more of an effort to train first nations people in their communities, rather than relocating the students to their often-intimidating large campuses. These same institutions need to stop putting so much effort into streaming First Nations people into select fields – law, social work, education – and to broaden the reach of business, technological, apprenticeship, administrative and career-ready programs. The country needs to support the continued work of training organizations like the National Centre for First Nations Governance that are raising the standards for aboriginal political and public affairs.

Canadians need to stop looking for panaceas – the sweeping constitutional change, the one critical government program, the revolution in first nations governance – that will miraculously solve all aboriginal problems, reverse the crises and assuage our collective guilt. There are no magic solutions. What lies ahead is a great deal of hard work, sure to be filled with moments of despair and failure, as well as celebration. The search for meaningful change involves building hope community-by-community, working with leaders and residents that want, profoundly, to alter their trajectory and create new opportunities. More than anything, it requires ten thousand – no, make that at least a million – Canadians to decide that they will step forward and create the Canada that they want, inviting First Nations fully into the fold as neighbours, friends and full partners in Confederation. It is about time all Canadians began to live as treaty peoples.

Canadians have a real choice: We can wait for the government of Canada to act, while recognizing that historic legacies, legal requirements and financial constraints tie their hands. We can wait for first nations to address the governance shortcomings and financial challenges in their communities, while acknowledging that no other group in Canada faces such formidable barriers to success. Or, perhaps, we can simply exercise our collective responsibilities and address the crises being faced by fellow Canadians.

Difficulties as deeply entrenched in history, law, politics and public sentiment as those facing First Nations are not going to be addressed overnight. But, for crying out loud, we have all stood on the sidelines for far too long. Let’s stop claiming it is the government’s duty or the first nations’ fault. Let’s take collective responsibility for the greatest blight on the body politic of what is otherwise the greatest country on earth.

The first step – the hardest step – is also unbelievably easy. Reach out to first nations, nearby or far away. Do not wait for “government” to solve deep and systemic problems that, properly, lay with all Canadians. Canadians have always had a passion for social justice, whether from a social democratic, liberal, or conservative tradition. However, trying to recreate a 1960s-type social service solution for first nations is simply not on for Canada, if it ever was. Today, we need a new approach, a true 21st century model that draws the citizens of this country into one of the greatest challenges Canada has ever faced and that changes the way Canadians work together to solve their problems.

Responding to the challenges of first-nations communities, creating a path to opportunity, cultural sustainability, and economic engagement, would be an achievement worthy of a wealthy, caring and intelligent nation. We have waited too long. We can wait no longer. All Canadians must extend hands of friendship and mutual respect to their First Nations Canadian neighbours. We must, as a country, realize that we can change the world for the better. We start now.
 
CDNBear
+4
#2
Quote: Originally Posted by dumpthemonarchyView Post

If Canadains are responsible, then I vote to make aboriginals regular Canadians...

Your fascism aside. They tried that already, with legislation and forced assimilation.

It didn't work.

And lets not forget, self determination is a fundamental human right.
 
gerryh
+2
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by dumpthemonarchyView Post

If Canadains are responsible, then I vote to make aboriginals regular Canadians and let them have property rights, just like us to make up for the big mess that is run by the govt. End all silly talk of them being "nations" as they get billions every year. And don't give another penny to chiefs. Give them exactly what is stated in treaties, then end the treaties.



As usual, your stupidity knows no bounds. For those First Nations that have treaties already signed with Canada, how do you expect to both uphold that treaty AND end the treaty? The treaties don't have an "end date". As for those Nations that DON'T have a treaty signed as of yet because of government inaction, what do you suggest for them?


Oh yes, and try to be coherent and keep your bigoted and racist ideals in your back pocket for this.
 
Cliffy
+3
#4
Dump - the one trick pony: If it ain't white, it ain't right.
 
Cannuck
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by dumpthemonarchyView Post

.... they should move quickly and forcefully to repair the damage, providing equality of opportunity if not equality of circumstance...

Tough to do when self professed aboriginals fight against that.

Quote: Originally Posted by gerryhView Post

... how do you expect to both uphold that treaty AND end the treaty?.

That's the easy part. Treat them as you would any other "nation".
 
skookumchuck
+2
#6
The founders and everyday people who built this country had to progress to overcome sinking back into the often poisonous cultures they left to start anew here. With notable, if not wonderful success.
In light of the modern world, i could be described as a "cultural racist". Thus i would not at all encourage the current feel good and PC attitude of finding zero fault with the natives historical culture.
Being honest with ourselves and the real world would be a start. Had i not been exposed to criticism in my growing up i would have ended up with a mind like a permanently poverty stricken movie star.
 
#juan
+5
#7
I put myself through university. My wife and I put our children through college. I was second youngest of
10 kids so I got no help from my parents. I have made a pretty good living and my kids are doing well. My
point is that there are programs available for every aboriginal to do exactly what I did except the government
will pay the tuition. They didn't pay mine. I know that university or tech school is not for everyone but they
are offered. Maybe CDNbear can tell us what is needed.
 
CDNBear
+6
#8  Top Rated Post
Quote: Originally Posted by #juanView Post

Maybe CDNbear can tell us what is needed.

A shiny new boot, installed in many asses on many reservations.

Thankfully, I had a Grandfather that made sure I had all the tools needed to do just as you did.
 
#juan
+1
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by CDNBearView Post

A shiny new boot, installed in many asses on many reservations.

Thankfully, I had a Grandfather that made sure I had all the tools needed to do just as you did.

It wasn't all smooth sailing. I decided that I knew everything in grade nine. I lost over a year finding out I didn't.
 
L Gilbert
+2
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by dumpthemonarchyView Post

If Canadains are responsible, then I vote to make aboriginals regular Canadians and let them have property rights, just like us to make up for the big mess that is run by the govt. End all silly talk of them being "nations" as they get billions every year. And don't give another penny to chiefs. Give them exactly what is stated in treaties, then end the treaties.

Tried and failed.
You seem to be like Custer; bound and determined to force everyone else to conform to your opinion of FN people's and then trying to convince everyone that you know what should be done without having a clue about them.

Looks like you?
 
CDNBear
+1
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by #juanView Post

It wasn't all smooth sailing. I decided that I knew everything in grade nine. I lost over a year finding out I didn't.

Same here sir.
 
SLM
+4
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by #juanView Post

It wasn't all smooth sailing. I decided that I knew everything in grade nine. I lost over a year finding out I didn't.

Doesn't everybody know everything in grade nine? I always figure when you're young you think you know everything, but when you get older you realize how little you really do know.
 
damngrumpy
#13
First of all I paid my own way as well and that is not a problem as I believe education is
the key and I don't care how one gets the advantages of that. Native kids have a chance
to get an education and one paid for, and that is a good thing in my opinion. I also do
believe as Canadians we should be thinking of education as an investment not an
expense. All children in a country as rich as ours should have the chance to go to post
secondary or the trades and there could be a funding program to do that. Not a student
loan program either. That program is downloading in my view, the government has all
but abandoned today's youth, and put them at the mercy of the loan sharks known as
bankers.
I believe we could institute a program of time bank education. Students could go to
university or trade school institutions and not pay as long as they kept their marks in line
with their ability. Once they received their education they could work on projects at say
for argument sake 70% of their earning potential for a specific period of time until they
paid a significant sum back to the country that supported them. In addition we could
afford to upgrade our national infrastructure and they would get a practicum education
after training.
If you don't think this is a solution why are we subsidizing Doctors across the country and
expecting nothing in return. A few months ago I was listening to a CBC program and it
was stated that the subsidy for some fields of endeavour such as Doctors amounts to on
average 250 thousand bucks and there ends up being no strings attached.
There are a number of problems and there are a lot of solutions as well be just have to
discover them. Remember for every mountain of challenges there is a valley of opportunity
waiting to be discovered.
 
taxslave
+1
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by SLMView Post

Doesn't everybody know everything in grade nine? I always figure when you're young you think you know everything, but when you get older you realize how little you really do know.

Just the Alzheimer's. You just forgot.LOL

Quote: Originally Posted by CDNBearView Post

A shiny new boot, installed in many asses on many reservations.

Thankfully, I had a Grandfather that made sure I had all the tools needed to do just as you did.

That is essentially what dumpy said in his usual eloquent was.
But I would add a few thousand asses in Ottawa as well.
 
Omicron
#15
Pretend how the most perfect giant dick gets stuck down the thought of the most giant sucker.

Pretend how upon the thought to go through that one's head it heard this upon sucking:

tunes.digitalock.com/raggleta...o_dancemix.mp3 (external - login to view)

Pretend how on a hyperspace level it's okay to kill evil as much as an antibody to kill a virus
 
Ariadne
#16
That reminds me of a trilogy I read when I was about 22 years old ... about the giant worm that had the stuff that the blue people needed to survive ... or was it just blue eyes.

... not good with names and titles.
 
Omicron
#17
Crap.

Every been drafter to be a cop? tunes.digitalock.com/officerkrumpky.mp3 (external - login to view)

I'm no good as RCMP. They are way better than me. All I can do is get my friends to beat up the idiots.

Heavenly father I must pray.... I am the worst... all I would do is dehydrate their brains into little pancakes of nothingness until they get rehydrated in order to wake up.

As a a quick asside, I'm going to tell you guys about the options of ganging up with deep Alabamians versus the options of me having the ability to f-cking hammer you idiots over the head, which if you had any sense of prayerness you would never notice. All you would notice is that you're born unto a level of reality more according unto your nature, meaning it's okay with God if you keep the doorways clear.

tunes.digitalock.com/officerkrumpky.mp3 (external - login to view)

In the mean time it's a long complicated story... all I am going to do is figure out a way to feed Lucifer's hyper-space desire to live forever feeding on Thermodynamcis until it-hole gets fed by crap and wodners how it dies like an in extinct sulerian creature 250 million years ago.

What happens if I have a way for humans to live after their bodies die, plus having prayed so much that I got figured out a way to stick Lucifer in a Pen, such that we can change history, which was written then by statements from scripture.

Heavenly Father I just got an idea...

tunes.digitalock.com/midnightgambler.mp3 (external - login to view)

What if us Humans do that thing out of from mud being the attack God got from His creation of Lucifer followed by Jesus which He had to do with a Woman?
 
Ariadne
#18
So, were you saying that you were schitzophrenic,or dyslexic ... again?
 
wulfie68
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by AriadneView Post

That reminds me of a trilogy I read when I was about 22 years old ... about the giant worm that had the stuff that the blue people needed to survive ... or was it just blue eyes.

... not good with names and titles.

Frank Herbert's Dune? Where the worms produced the Spice that everyone wanted and use of it gave people blue on blue eyes?
 
L Gilbert
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by damngrumpyView Post

First of all I paid my own way as well and that is not a problem as I believe education is
the key and I don't care how one gets the advantages of that. Native kids have a chance
to get an education and one paid for, and that is a good thing in my opinion. I also do
believe as Canadians we should be thinking of education as an investment not an
expense. All children in a country as rich as ours should have the chance to go to post
secondary or the trades and there could be a funding program to do that. Not a student
loan program either. That program is downloading in my view, the government has all
but abandoned today's youth, and put them at the mercy of the loan sharks known as
bankers.
I believe we could institute a program of time bank education. Students could go to
university or trade school institutions and not pay as long as they kept their marks in line
with their ability. Once they received their education they could work on projects at say
for argument sake 70% of their earning potential for a specific period of time until they
paid a significant sum back to the country that supported them. In addition we could
afford to upgrade our national infrastructure and they would get a practicum education
after training.
If you don't think this is a solution why are we subsidizing Doctors across the country and
expecting nothing in return. A few months ago I was listening to a CBC program and it
was stated that the subsidy for some fields of endeavour such as Doctors amounts to on
average 250 thousand bucks and there ends up being no strings attached.
There are a number of problems and there are a lot of solutions as well be just have to
discover them. Remember for every mountain of challenges there is a valley of opportunity
waiting to be discovered.

Yes, aboriginals must conform to be just like we are.
Some have become similar to us, some haven't. But it's unrealistic to expect FN peoples to be the same.
 
Nuggler
+4
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by SLMView Post

Doesn't everybody know everything in grade nine? I always figure when you're young you think you know everything, but when you get older you realize how little you really do know.

I knew I wanted to go back to grade 8. BIG high school -- BIG crowds -- The older I get, the more I think if would have been a good idea.

As to the First Nations, I have, as usual, no freaking clue, and nothing positive to add to this thread. Do wish them well. Carry on.

However;--------- I don't feel I'm responsible for anyone's plight, except my own. If I may be of assistance, real assistance, don't hesitate to call. Will do what I can to help.

And, I don't mean just passing out pamphlets at some fukking feelgood seminar.
 
CDNBear
+1
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by taxslaveView Post

That is essentially what dumpy said in his usual eloquent way.

Not really.

Quote: Originally Posted by L GilbertView Post

Yes, aboriginals must conform to be just like we are.
Some have become similar to us, some haven't. But it's unrealistic to expect FN peoples to be the same.

Actually, if you were to change the subject of who should change, to say, any other visible minority. Many people here who rail against First Nations wishing to maintain their unique culture. Would be screaming racism/bigotry.
 
L Gilbert
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by CDNBearView Post

Not really.

Actually, if you were to change the subject of who should change, to say, any other visible minority. Many people here who rail against First Nations wishing to maintain their unique culture. Would be screaming racism/bigotry.

Most likely.
I just think rather than people expecting FNs to adapt to their society, FNs could adapt Canadian society to fit their societies.
 
CDNBear
#24
Quote: Originally Posted by L GilbertView Post

Most likely.
I just think rather than people expecting FNs to adapt to their society, FNs could adapt Canadian society to fit their societies.

There's people here, that would call that racism too.

Their not very well read, when it comes to First Nations. As you've seen.
 
L Gilbert
#25
Oh yeah. Hence my comment about Custer a few posts back. lol

Recognition of societal differences isn't racism any more than recognition of skin color is. Racism, AKA bigotry, has to do with subordinating, not differentiating.

Um, good morning, Bear.
 
Machjo
+1
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by CDNBearView Post

Your fascism aside. They tried that already, with legislation and forced assimilation.

It didn't work.

And lets not forget, self determination is a fundamental human right.

We could rescind the Treaties and give them their land back, I suppose.
 
Nuggler
+2
#27
Quote: Originally Posted by MachjoView Post

We could rescind the Treaties and give them their land back, I suppose.


Yep, and I could go back to Scotland and raise sheep...............not likely to happen either. The Brits levelled our little stone shanty. Took the sheep too, the bawstards. At least they provided steerage for me great great great greats, and they git while the gitten was good.

And I hate sheep.
 
Cliffy
#28
Quote: Originally Posted by NugglerView Post

Yep, and I could go back to Scotland and raise sheep...............not likely to happen either. The Brits levelled our little stone shanty. Took the sheep too, the bawstards. At least they provided steerage for me great great great greats, and they git while the gitten was good.

And I hate sheep.

I can relate: I can't wear wool (itches like the Dickens) and they don't taste so good. But their milk is sweet and as close to human mother's milk as anything on the planet. Makes pretty good cheese too.

And being of British decent, I agree with anybody who thinks the Brits done them wrong. Civilized barbarians they are.
 
Cannuck
#29
Quote: Originally Posted by CliffyView Post

And being of British decent, I agree with anybody who thinks the Brits done them wrong. Civilized barbarians they are.

Maybe you should give everything you own to Nuggler as restitution for all the things "your people" did to "his people"
 
Liberalman
#30
First Nations do not want to be Canadians they just want their land back so they can develop it the way they want.

This is why settling land claims with the aboriginals are so important for Canada.

Canada decided to keep their promise and keep the treaties although over the years the government did not fulfill all al the promises the legal document is still in force.
 
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