F35 B Interesting airplane


jjaycee98
#1
F-35B Ship Suitability Testing - YouTube (external - login to view)

This video link is fresh (for the public). It was made just six weeks ago in the Atlantic, just off Newport News (Hampton Roads), Virginia.These are the latest sea trials of the F-35B on the USS Wasp. They were very successful, with 74 VL's and STO's in a three week period
The media and the program critics had predicted that we would burn holes in the deck and wash sailors overboard, neither of which happened. You will notice a sailor standing on the bow of the ship as the jet rotates.
That was an intentional part of the sea trials.
No catapult... No hook.... It’s a new world out there!


This was supposed to be with the above. Sorry. Up toooooooooo early!
 
lone wolf
#2
Burned holes might have been a problem when carrier flight decks were still oak-planked. I can see recovery operations being a lot safer on high seas.
 
jjaycee98
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolfView Post

Burned holes might have been a problem when carrier flight decks were still oak-planked. I can see recovery operations being a lot safer on high seas.

Apparently Britain has had a fixed wing plane that can hover, and land vertically for several years. We are just so far behind in North America because we follow the USA lead so much.

Spent some time with a German fellow recently and viewed German magazines showing equipment in the trucking industry that is light years ahead of anything in North America. Trucks that can be operated without a driver-all computerized. Heating systems within a vehicle so that they do not need to be plugged in, in winter and do not need to be left running-burning up fuel and polluting the air. These are trucks that travel in Norway, Sweden and Russia; so they have winter temperatures equal to Canada winters.
 
MHz
#4
Did you know the navy version wasn't supposed to have vertical take-off capabilities, the reason these trials are going on is the arrestor hook on the naval version is so close to the wheels it won't pick-up the cable. Do these new trials use planes that have a hook in case of a malfunction in the vertical landing system? If not why are they even trying for carrier service, it would seem to make more sense to pot a spring behind yje hook so it rides lower and can catch the lower cable (as a result of the tires rolling over the cable.

Quote: Originally Posted by jjaycee98View Post

Heating systems within a vehicle so that they do not need to be plugged in, in winter and do not need to be left running-burning up fuel and polluting the air. These are trucks that travel in Norway, Sweden and Russia; so they have winter temperatures equal to Canada winters.

Any idea why the oil-pan isn't heated via a heating element like one on a stove. the heat from the oil would rise to warm the crank and the walls of the cylinder which is where all the increased friction comes from when it gets cold out. Warm oil at start-up would also circulated through the engine quicker and in theory heating the smaller amount of oil would be cheaper than heating all the water in the block, the system just doesn't lose the heat to the atmosphere as it keeps most of the heat going into an air pocket that is essentially a closed system, the water would pick up the last remnants of heat and none would escape to the atmosphere right off the bat.
 
lone wolf
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by jjaycee98View Post

Apparently Britain has had a fixed wing plane that can hover, and land vertically for several years. We are just so far behind in North America because we follow the USA lead so much.

Spent some time with a German fellow recently and viewed German magazines showing equipment in the trucking industry that is light years ahead of anything in North America. Trucks that can be operated without a driver-all computerized. Heating systems within a vehicle so that they do not need to be plugged in, in winter and do not need to be left running-burning up fuel and polluting the air. These are trucks that travel in Norway, Sweden and Russia; so they have winter temperatures equal to Canada winters.

AVRO proposed VTOL for the CF-100 back in the fifties. The Harrier has killed more pilots than combat action. They're pretty much like balancing on a board on a beachball - but they were starting points. Now there is the fly-by-wire technology to augment and enhance seat-of-the-pants ability
 
damngrumpy
#6
The British had the Herrier jet with vertical take off and landing. McDonnell Douglas made them.
There was a second version of them made but for some reason and I think it had something to
do with structural design they shut down manufacture a couple of years ago. But some are
still in use by the British. F35 is another generation of copied and improved technology.
I often wonder how much knowledge they gained from the Avro Arrow that in my opinion for its
time was the best military plane made. Its production was thwarted simply because Diefenbaker
didn't like CD Howe the Liberal Minister of Everything, that had the plane developed and production
begun. The twists and turns of history, have left us with the feeling of what might have been.
We could have been a leading pioneer in Aviation and military production, but again that is what
might have been.
 
#juan
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by damngrumpyView Post

The British had the Herrier jet with vertical take off and landing. McDonnell Douglas made them.
There was a second version of them made but for some reason and I think it had something to
do with structural design they shut down manufacture a couple of years ago. But some are
still in use by the British. F35 is another generation of copied and improved technology.
I often wonder how much knowledge they gained from the Avro Arrow that in my opinion for its
time was the best military plane made. Its production was thwarted simply because Diefenbaker
didn't like CD Howe the Liberal Minister of Everything, that had the plane developed and production
begun. The twists and turns of history, have left us with the feeling of what might have been.
We could have been a leading pioneer in Aviation and military production, but again that is what
might have been.

The British Harrier was built by Hawker Siddley in Britain. The Americans re-built it with a lighter wing
and a few other changes. The British used their Harrier against Argentina in that war and it killed
everything the Argentinos threw at it except the Exocet missile.
 
jjaycee98
#8
Any idea why the oil-pan isn't heated via a heating element like one on a stove. the heat from the oil would rise to warm the crank and the walls of the cylinder which is where all the increased friction comes from when it gets cold out. Warm oil at start-up would also circulated through the engine quicker and in theory heating the smaller amount of oil would be cheaper than heating all the water in the block, the system just doesn't lose the heat to the atmosphere as it keeps most of the heat going into an air pocket that is essentially a closed system, the water would pick up the last remnants of heat and none would escape to the atmosphere right off the bat.[/QUOTE]

Point is why are we not taking advantage of what other countries know. Why do we always stick to American made models? Alaska is a small part of the USA & the rest of the country has no need for block heaters.

Is the military plane we are looking to buy of the same series?
 
lone wolf
#9
The old bush guys used to drain the oil and keep it warm near the stove then pour it back in just before start-up. Heating oil in the pan releases moisture that turns to ice up top. Heating oil can also cook it - creating sludge and clogging up passages with 'frying-pan-guck'
 
DaSleeper
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolfView Post

The old bush guys used to drain the oil and keep it warm near the stove then pour it back in just before start-up. Heating oil in the pan releases moisture that turns to ice up top. Heating oil can also cook it - creating sludge and clogging up passages with 'frying-pan-guck'

Remember the old Volkswagon bug block heater????
Since it was air cooled, the heater was a simple element with a reflector under the oil pan....
 
lone wolf
#11
Yeah.... I remember the whole cylinder could be replaced too - in just a couple of hours
 

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