Seniors don't want to give up money for younger gen: poll


gore0bsessed
#91
Quote: Originally Posted by DaSleeperView Post

Just when you think this guy has written his dumbest post.....he surpasses himself.....

I guess it doesn't really matter,a nuclear bomb is a nuclear bomb. It's true however that they've become much more accurate and thus capable of more devastation ...
 
IdRatherBeSkiing
#92
Quote: Originally Posted by gore0bsessedView Post

I guess it doesn't really matter,a nuclear bomb is a nuclear bomb. It's true however that they've become much more accurate and thus capable of more devastation ...

Accuracy has never been an overriding factor in nuclear warfare. You could miss by mile and still have a pretty big crater.
 
gore0bsessed
#93
Some have become much smaller today and not just laying waste to massive swaths of land anymore.
 
Angstrom
#94
Is standard of living slowly getting worst? Sure. But only cause it went way to high and is un-sustainable, I think.

Anyways. The boomer's can't live forever, we could easily see a housing price drop in 20-25 years. Just
Think of all the houses that are going to be given in wills. Everyone's going to have 3 houses.

Just like right now the market place is oversaturated with workers from 3 generation. Is that hurting wage's, You bet yea!

But look at it this way in the next 10 years a hole lot of boomers will be retiring and that's going to change the landscape.

People need to relax stop stressing and just live life, you know be happy. When where 55 I bet our kids will be crying too.

And I'll tell them, suck it up sunshine. xDDDDD
 
JLM
#95
I wonder if the work ethic of the generation today has anything to do with the wage level they are complaining about?
 
Angstrom
#96
Quote: Originally Posted by JLMView Post

I wonder if the work ethic of the generation today has anything to do with the wage level they are complaining about?

I'd say. absolutly not.

Its due to 10 people for one job. To many people in the market.
On the other hand if you have 20 jobs for 1 person then wage's will go up.

Supply and demand. its that simple.

Your just trolling xDDDD
Last edited by Angstrom; Dec 20th, 2011 at 10:16 PM..
 
Cannuck
-1
#97
Quote: Originally Posted by IdRatherBeSkiingView Post

Did your parents and grandparents have smartphones?

My grand parents died along time ago but both my parents and my inlaws do, though I'm not quite sure the relevance of that. Why would anybody starting out today want a land line instead of a smart phone?

Quote: Originally Posted by IdRatherBeSkiingView Post

Designer clothing? A lot of them seem to be doing it with their parents money.

...and a lot aren't. My twenty something kid can support herself.

Quote: Originally Posted by IdRatherBeSkiingView Post

Maybe as my age widens from the 20 somethings I notice it more. But I don't remember all my friends having all the toys.

Loss of memory is often associated with the aging process


Quote: Originally Posted by IdRatherBeSkiingView Post

We had a beater for a car which we bought with money from our summer or part time jobs.

So? Did you have to have a safety done on it? I bet if you didn't know how to fix it, you knew somebody that could. Comparing the gizmos and gadgets of your generation with the current generation is just plain silly.

Quote: Originally Posted by IdRatherBeSkiingView Post

And perhaps there are some who are working hard for their money who get hidden by these spoiled brats.

I'm sure there are hard working seniors that hidden by the spoiled brats of their generation. You silly twits can prattle on all you like about the younger generations but they work more hours on average than the seniors did and whine alot less about what they are entitled to.

Quote: Originally Posted by IdRatherBeSkiingView Post

And most people I know regardless of their age don't control the government's deficit. There have been bad governments of each stripe over the years who have spent beyond their means.

...and the seniors kept voting them back in election after election after election. Why don't you just buck up and start paying your fair share?

Quote: Originally Posted by BruSanView Post

What the hell are you talking about? They artificially inflated their standard of living, are you sitting behind some schools bookshelves somewhere during a free period? They are guilty of no more than you will be for signing onto whatever government of the day sells you a bill of goods you end up voting for.

They didn't run the economy then any more than you do (or think you do) now! give yourself a shake and stop seeking someone to blame for your terrible existance with your wide screen and 17" laptop. Boy you spoiled brats take the cake!

I don't have a terrible existence. I have a pretty good life....forty-seven years old with a great job, no debt and generally speaking have the world by the balls.....no thanks to the seniors of this country. Look, your generation continued to vote in government after government that borrowed money to finance your social programs. If you people had an ounce of integrity, you would be more than willing to pay your fair share instead of dumping the debt onto your kids and grand kids.
 
Praxius
#98
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalflossView Post

Seniors don't want to give up money for younger gen: poll

VANCOUVER (NEWS1130) - More evidence that generational tensions are high; a poll (external - login to view) finds seniors aren't keen to relinquish publicly-funded services in order to help the struggling younger generations.



Fair enough... then we'll hang onto our publicly funded services against them.... maybe we should apply for work outside of the health care system so we're not stuck having to pamper their arses when they can't wipe them themselves.

Quote:

Seventy per cent of seniors asked felt they should be a top priority when it comes to doling out government cash.

Why?

As another member pointed out, they're the ones leaving us with the debt, we're the ones currently working for society, they should have enough money saved up for retirement if they did what they were supposed to and plan properly.

The younger generation is struggling & needs help and yet they don't want to help?

They raised us to be the way we are, they created the society that left us in this position.

Quote:

UBC's Paul Kershaw (external - login to view) is surprised most of them say they know families are struggling. "Even so, 80 per cent of Canadians 55-plus say they have earned their fair share of the wealth produced by Canada's economy and therefore deserve to enjoy the benefits."

He believes the older generation might want to think about their kids a little more because they're the ones who will deal with the consequences of actions we take today.

"As the baby boomers in particular approach retirement, they're leaving larger government debts and an environmental record that isn't that great. It's going to be their kids and grandchildren who need to pay for it," he says.

G'damn greedy Hippies.

Quote:

Kershaw notes the result is especially surprising, considering things like housing values and lower poverty rates have made it much easier to retire.

He adds Statistics Canada (external - login to view) data show poverty among seniors has declined from 29 per cent in 1976 to less than five per cent in 2009. The poverty rate for families with kids under the age of six is 15 per cent.

The poll also shows 65 per cent of 18-44 year olds believe "a greater share of wealth produced in Canada should be invested in the next generation

Quote:

of families and children."

Seniors don't want to give up money for younger gen: poll - News1130 (external - login to view)

Alrighty then.... let's gather up all these fossils, stick them on a chunk of ice and shove them out to sea.
 
Ron in Regina
+7
#99
Uhm.....going forward...I found this in my InBox tonight
after I Logged Out'a the Forum, and was about to head
for the shower before bed. Think I'll share it here.

It was titled, "Christmas Eve 1881".
Pa never had much compassion for the lazy or those who squandered their means and then never had enough for
the necessities. But for those who were genuinely in need,
his heart was as big as all outdoors. It was from him that I
learned the greatest joy in life comes from giving, not from
receiving.
It was Christmas Eve, 1881. I was fifteen years old and
feeling like the world had caved in on me because there
just hadn't been enough money to buy me the rifle that I'd
wanted for Christmas. We did the chores early that night for
some reason. I just figured Pa wanted a little extra time so we
could read in the Bible.
After supper was over I took my boots off and stretched out
in front of the fireplace and waited for Pa to get down the old
Bible. I was still feeling sorry for myself and, to be honest, I
wasn't in much of a mood to read Scriptures. But Pa didn't get
the Bible, instead he bundled up again and went outside. I
couldn't figure it out because we had already done all the
chores. I didn't worry about it long though, I was too busy
wallowing in self-pity.
Soon Pa came back in. It was a cold clear night out and there
was ice in his beard. "Come on, Matt," he said. "Bundle up
good, it's cold out tonight." I was really upset then. Not only
wasn't I getting the rifle for Christmas, now Pa was dragging
me out in the cold, and for no earthly reason that I could see.
We'd already done all the chores, and I couldn't think of
anything else that needed doing, especially not on a night like
this. But I knew Pa was not very patient at one dragging one's
feet when he'd told them to do something, so I got up and put
my boots back on and got my cap, coat, and mittens. Ma gave
me a mysterious smile as I opened the door to leave the house.
Something was up, but I didn't know what.
Outside, I became even more dismayed. There in front of the
house was the work team, already hitched to the big sled.
Whatever it was we were going to do wasn't going to be a
short, quick, little job. I could tell. We never hitched up this sled
unless we were going to haul a big load. Pa was already up on
the seat, reins in hand. I reluctantly climbed up beside him.
The cold was already biting at me. I wasn't happy.
When I was on, Pa pulled the sled around the house and
stopped in front of the woodshed. He got off and I followed. "I
think we'll put on the high sideboards," he said. "Here, help
me." The high sideboards! It had been a bigger job than I
wanted to do with just the low sideboards on, but whatever it
was we were going to do would be a lot bigger with the high
side boards on..
After we had exchanged the sideboards, Pa went into the
woodshed and came out with an armload of wood - the wood
I'd spent all summer hauling down from the mountain, and then
all fall sawing into blocks and splitting. What was he doing?
Finally I said something. "Pa," I asked, "what are you doing?"
"You been by the Widow Jensen's lately?" he asked.. The
Widow Jensen lived about two miles down the road. Her
husband had died a year or so before and left her with three
children, the oldest being eight. Sure, I'd been by, but so what?

Yeah," I said, "Why?"
"I rode by just today," Pa said. "Little Jakey was out digging
around in the woodpile trying to find a few chips. They're out of
wood, Matt." That was all he said and then he turned and went
back into the woodshed for another armload of wood. I followed
him. We loaded the sled so high that I began to wonder if the
horses would be able to pull it. Finally, Pa called a halt to our
loading, then we went to the smoke house and Pa took down a
big ham and a side of bacon. He handed them to me and told
me to put them in the sled and wait. When he returned he was
carrying a sack of flour over his right shoulder and a smaller
sack of something in his left hand. "What's in the little sack?" I
asked.

Shoes, they're out of shoes. Little Jakey just had gunny sacks
wrapped around his feet when he was out in the woodpile this
morning. I got the children a little candy too. It just wouldn't be
Christmas without a little candy."
We rode the two miles to Widow Jensen's pretty much in
silence. I tried to think through what Pa was doing. We didn't
have much by worldly standards. Of course, we did have a big
woodpile, though most of what was left now was still in the form
of logs that I would have to saw into blocks and split before we
could use it. We also had meat and flour, so we could spare
that, but I knew we didn't have any money, so why was Pa
buying them shoes and candy? Really, why was he doing any
of this? Widow Jensen had closer neighbors than us; it
shouldn't have been our concern.
We came in from the blind side of the Jensen house and
unloaded the wood as quietly as possible, then we took the
meat and flour and shoes to the door.

We knocked. The door opened a crack and a timid voice said,
"Who is it?"
"Lucas Miles, Ma'am, and my son, Matt... could we come in for
a bit?"
Widow Jensen opened the door and let us in. She had a
blanket wrapped around her shoulders. The children were
wrapped in another and were sitting in front of the fireplace by
a very small fire that hardly gave off any heat at all. Widow
Jensen fumbled with a match and finally lit the lamp.
"We brought you a few things, Ma'am," Pa said and set down
the sack of flour. I put the meat on the table. Then Pa handed
her the sack that had the shoes in it. She opened it hesitantly
and took the shoes out, one pair at a time. There was a pair for
her and one for each of the children - sturdy shoes, the best....
shoes that would last. I watched her carefully.
She bit her lower lip to keep it from trembling and then tears
filled her eyes and started running down her cheeks. She
looked up at Pa like she wanted to say something, but it
wouldn't come out.
"We brought a load of wood too, Ma'am," Pa said. He turned to
me and said, "Matt, go bring in enough to last awhile. Let's get
that fire up to size and heat this place up."
I wasn't the same person when I went back out to bring in the
wood. I had a big lump in my throat and as much as I hate to
admit it, there were tears in my eyes too. In my mind I kept
seeing those three kids huddled around the fireplace and their
mother standing there with tears running down her cheeks with
so much gratitude in her heart that she couldn't speak. My
heart swelled within me and a joy that I'd never known before,
filled my soul. I had given at Christmas many times before, but
never when it had made so much difference. I could see we
were literally saving the lives of these people.
I soon had the fire blazing and everyone's spirits soared. The
kids started giggling when Pa handed them each a piece of
candy and Widow Jensen looked on with a smile that probably
hadn't crossed her face for a long time. She finally turned to us.
"God bless you," she said. "I know the Lord has sent you. The
children and I have been praying that he would send one of his
angels to spare us."
In spite of myself, the lump returned to my throat and the tears
welled up in my eyes again. I'd never thought of Pa in those
exact terms before, but after Widow Jensen mentioned it, I
could see that it was probably true. I was sure that a better man
than Pa had never walked the earth. I started remembering all
the times he had gone out of his way for Ma and me, and many
others. The list seemed endless as I thought on it..
Pa insisted that everyone try on the shoes before we left. I was
amazed when they all fit, and I wondered how he had known
what sizes to get. Then I guessed that if he was on an errand
for the Lord, that the Lord would make sure he got the right
sizes.
Tears were running down Widow Jensen's face again when we
stood up to leave. Pa took each of the kids in his big arms and
gave them a hug. They clung to him and didn't want us to go. I
could see that they missed their Pa, and I was glad that I still
had mine.
At the door Pa turned to Widow Jensen and said, "The Mrs.
wanted me to invite you and the children over for Christmas
dinner tomorrow. The turkey will be more than the three of us
can eat, and a man can get cantankerous if he has to eat
turkey for too many meals. We'll be by to get you about eleven.
It'll be nice to have some little ones around again. Matt, here,
hasn't been little for quite a spell." I was the youngest... my two
brothers and two sisters had all married and had moved away.
Widow Jensen nodded and said, "Thank you, Brother Miles. I
don't have to say, may the Lord bless you, I know for certain
that He will."
Out on the sled I felt a warmth that came from deep within and I
didn't even notice the cold. When we had gone a ways, Pa
turned to me and said, "Matt, I want you to know something.
Your Ma and me have been tucking a little money away here
and there all year so we could buy that rifle for you, but we
didn't have quite enough. Then yesterday a man who owed me
a little money from years back came by to make things square.

Your Ma and me were real excited, thinking that now we could
get you that rifle, and I started into town this morning to do just
that, but on the way I saw little Jakey out scratching in the
woodpile with his feet wrapped in those gunny sacks and I
knew what I had to do. Son, I spent the money for shoes and a
little candy for those children. I hope you understand."

I understood alright... and my eyes became wet with tears
again. I understood very well, and I was so glad Pa had done it.
Now the rifle seemed very low on my list of priorities. Pa had
given me a lot more. He had given me the look on Widow
Jensen's face and the radiant smiles of her three children..

For the rest of my life, whenever I saw any of the Jensens, or
split a block of wood, I remembered, and remembering brought
back that same joy I felt riding home beside Pa that night. Pa
had given me much more than a rifle that night, he had given
me the best Christmas of my life.
Anyway...It sure puts the giving & sharing thing in perspective,
doesn't it?
Last edited by Ron in Regina; Dec 21st, 2011 at 05:50 PM..Reason: Atempt at fixing a spacing issue.
 
JLM
+3
#100
Good story, Ron- tough to read through that without shedding a tear!
 
Ron in Regina
+1
#101
Quote: Originally Posted by JLMView Post

Good story, Ron- tough to read through that without shedding a tear!

I did (Shead a tear or two, that is). My Uncle sent that
to me. Wish I could "Greenie" an Email.
 
gerryh
+1
#102
Quote: Originally Posted by Ron in ReginaView Post

Uhm.....going forward...I found this in my InBox tonight
after I Logged Out'a the Forum, and was about to head
for the shower before bed. Think I'll share it here.

It was titled, "Christmas Eve 1881".

Pa never had much compassion for the lazy or those who squandered their means and then never had enough for
the necessities. But for those who were genuinely in need,
his heart was as big as all outdoors. It was from him that I
learned the greatest joy in life comes from giving, not from
receiving.

quote trimmed


Ya know Ron.... you are a real asshole sometimes.... and I doubt I need to explain that comment.
 
carless
+2
#103
I am a low income senior,living on OAS/GIS
84% on seniors on GIS are women. We were out of the workforce for many years raising children and when we tried to get back in to our fields, it was difficult so we took what was available,usually,public hygiene jobs/homecare,daycare,etc
I resent many seniors and their lavish lifestyles:trips everywhere,hotels,restaurants,new cars,and their expectation of respect for all their hard work.
They bought their houses when housing prices were relatively low,then sold them at current market prices for condos or other retirement housing.
They lived off the fat of the land, did nothing to raise the minimum wage, nor did they chirp up about other social ills,and still don't.
Yes, there are exceptions,but I see how most of them live, and it is quite lavish.
I think it is unfair for them to receive OAS when they don't need it. OAS gets scaled down around the $70,000 income bracket.
That money is kust paying for their airfares or remodelling.,whatever..
Better to scale back starting at say,$25,000
Seniors get so many perks.
eg, in BC they get to ride free on ferries,Mon to Thursday
often there are special rates for seniors for many venues too
and services like hairdressers,pharmacies have senior days.
Out here on the Westcoast, I encounter daily too many selfish well to do seniors.
 
mentalfloss
#104
While the anecdotal stuff is unfortunate, it's still beyond the pertinent fact that the cost of living for the average parent is much higher than that for the average senior.

If we're to be "ethical" about this, then we need to give to the people who need it most. I'm sure that for any outliers, you can make a claim for some kind of reimbursement as well even if you are not in the favoured group.
 
JLM
#105
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalflossView Post

While the anecdotal stuff is unfortunate, it's still beyond the pertinent fact that the cost of living for the average parent is much higher than that for the average senior.

If we're to be "ethical" about this, then we need to give to the people who need it most. I'm sure that for any outliers, you can make a claim for some kind of reimbursement as well even if you are not in the favoured group.

I think one of the biggest problems is the people who are doing the complaining have missed out on many of the experiences that people 30 years their senior struggled through and they missed out on having to "wear the same shoes". Looking backward at it from the tail end of my working days, many of these complainers lacked the work ethic that many of the older generation had.
 
Cannuck
+1
#106
Quote: Originally Posted by JLMView Post

I think one of the biggest problems is the people who are doing the complaining have missed out on many of the experiences that people 30 years their senior struggled through and they missed out on having to "wear the same shoes". Looking backward at it from the tail end of my working days, many of these complainers lacked the work ethic that many of the older generation had.

I think one of the biggest problems is the people who are doing the complaining have missed out on many of the experiences that people 30 years their junior struggle through and they missed out on having to "wear the same shoes". Looking forward at it from the front end of my working days, many of these complainers lacked the work ethic that many of the younger generation have.
 
captain morgan
+1
#107
Quote: Originally Posted by Ron in ReginaView Post

Uhm.....going forward...I found this in my InBox tonight
after I Logged Out'a the Forum, and was about to head
for the shower before bed. Think I'll share it here.

It was titled, "Christmas Eve 1881".

Anyway...I sure puts the giving & sharing thing in perspective,
doesn't it?

Great contribution Ron.... It sure does drive straight to the heart of the matter.
 
JLM
#108
Quote: Originally Posted by CannuckView Post

I think one of the biggest problems is the people who are doing the complaining have missed out on many of the experiences that people 30 years their junior struggle through and they missed out on having to "wear the same shoes". Looking forward at it from the front end of my working days, many of these complainers lacked the work ethic that many of the younger generation have.

 
mentalfloss
#109
Quote: Originally Posted by JLMView Post

I think one of the biggest problems is the people who are doing the complaining have missed out on many of the experiences that people 30 years their senior struggled through and they missed out on having to "wear the same shoes". Looking backward at it from the tail end of my working days, many of these complainers lacked the work ethic that many of the older generation had.

Work ethic is a subjective matter that is difficult to qualify, but it is also besides the point.

Regardless of what your work ethic is, it won't matter if the cost of living is higher. And the evidence is pretty convincing that the cost of living is much higher for this generation than last.
 
JLM
#110
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalflossView Post

Work ethic is a subjective matter that is difficult to qualify, but it is also besides the point.

Regardless of what your work ethic is, it won't matter if the cost of living is higher. And the evidence is pretty convincing that the cost of living is much higher for this generation than last.

You just ain't whistling Dixie. Keep on raising the minimum wage and you'll see a lot more!
 
IdRatherBeSkiing
#111
Quote: Originally Posted by CannuckView Post

My grand parents died along time ago but both my parents and my inlaws do, though I'm not quite sure the relevance of that. Why would anybody starting out today want a land line instead of a smart phone?

Did usually refers to past tense. As in 'when your parents or grandparents were 20somethings did they have smartphones?'.
 
captain morgan
+2
#112
Quote: Originally Posted by IdRatherBeSkiingView Post

Did usually refers to past tense. As in 'when your parents or grandparents were 20somethings did they have smartphones?'.


They didn't have smart phones per se, but they did have tin cans and string, which, at the time was the height of technology.
 
IdRatherBeSkiing
#113
Quote: Originally Posted by CannuckView Post

...and the seniors kept voting them back in election after election after election. Why don't you just buck up and start paying your fair share?

You assume politics was any different from today and there was a real choice of someone who would do things differently across the parlamentary floor?
 
Cliffy
+4
#114
Quote: Originally Posted by CannuckView Post

I think one of the biggest problems is the people who are doing the complaining

The ones doing all the complaining are you and the 40+ year olds. Bunch of whiny, sniveling little "poor me" brats.
The only reason the cost of living is so high is because people today don't know the difference between need and want. We didn't have 5% of the electronic crap people have today, we didn't have designer clothes or live in big houses. Our parents didn't drive us to sporting events, dancing or music lessons. We didn't have a TV in every freakin' room. We didn't eat out at restaurants more than once or twice a year. We didn't have more than one car or a house in the country. We wore hand me down clothes. You guys were spoiled and then you spoiled your own kids even worse and now you are whining about it? Grow a pair!
 
captain morgan
#115
Quote: Originally Posted by CliffyView Post

The ones doing all the complaining are you and the 40+ year olds. Bunch of whiny, sniveling little "poor me" brats.
The only reason the cost of living is so high is because people today don't know the difference between need and want. We didn't have 5% of the electronic crap people have today, we didn't have designer clothes or live in big houses. Our parents didn't drive us to sporting events, dancing or music lessons. We didn't have a TV in every freakin' room. We didn't eat out at restaurants more than once or twice a year. We didn't have more than one car or a house in the country. We wore hand me down clothes. You guys were spoiled and then you spoiled your own kids even worse and now you are whining about it? Grow a pair!


You are not wrong there Cliffy, however, the social safety system also reflects this as well... Chances are, that when you were a kid and had a fever or cold, your folks didn't rush you off to emergency for safety's sake.
 
Cannuck
+1
#116
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalflossView Post

Work ethic is a subjective matter that is difficult to qualify, but it is also besides the point.

Regardless of what your work ethic is, it won't matter if the cost of living is higher. And the evidence is pretty convincing that the cost of living is much higher for this generation than last.

My father (and his generation) worked his 40 hour week and spent his free time relaxing as the government took care of most of his peripherals. On a slow week, I work 48 hours. In my free time, I volunteer for the local Agricultural Society that owns and operates the hockey rink (since the town couldn't afford to run it any longer). I volunteer for the BoD of the golf course (since the town couldn't afford to run it any longer). I spend countless hours fundraising for the fire department and am the Casino Chairperson. We have raised money to purchase bunker gear, breathing apparatus, and upgrades to trucks (since the town couldn't afford to do it any longer). I volunteer at the school to fund raise for items the school needs (since the school board couldn't afford to do it any longer). I volunteer for the Lions Club doing projects or raising funds for projects such as playgrounds (since the town couldn't afford to do it any longer)

All these things I do in my spare time that my father never did because his generation just borrowed the money to run or build schools, rinks, golf courses, playgrounds and fire departments. Not only did he (and those of his generation) stick their kids and grand kids with the bill but they are the first ones to complain if the school, fire hall, playground or arena isn't up to standard and blame it on the younger generation. And, of course, they expect a discount on their golf membership.

They are THE most selfish generation by a country mile.

Quote: Originally Posted by IdRatherBeSkiingView Post

Did usually refers to past tense. As in 'when your parents or grandparents were 20somethings did they have smartphones?'.

How could they have smart phones when smart phones didn't exist? Would they have had them if they existed? Probably. The only people I can see that wouldn't have one are those that are afraid of technology.
 
JLM
#117
I see a lot of whining here from young brats about the older generation and the wealth they've managed to accumulate while running up debt for the brats to be burdened with later. Well when the older generation leaves the planet, many of them will leave behind material assets in the order of $1/2 million to $million of more, which the whining brats will likely inherit and if they are still concerned about debt they can sell the assets off to pay down the debt.
 
Cannuck
#118
Quote: Originally Posted by IdRatherBeSkiingView Post

You assume politics was any different from today and there was a real choice of someone who would do things differently across the parlamentary floor?

Politics was no different than today. Politicians are followers not leaders. There was no appetite for balanced budgets years ago so there was no incentive for politicians to balance budget. Perhaps if your generation just said no to your perks...
 
Cliffy
+2
#119
Quote: Originally Posted by CannuckView Post

My father (and his generation) worked his 40 hour week and spent his free time relaxing as the government took care of most of his peripherals. On a slow week, I work 48 hours. In my free time, I volunteer for the local Agricultural Society that owns and operates the hockey rink (since the town couldn't afford to run it any longer). I volunteer for the BoD of the golf course (since the town couldn't afford to run it any longer). I spend countless hours fundraising for the fire department and am the Casino Chairperson. We have raised money to purchase bunker gear, breathing apparatus, and upgrades to trucks (since the town couldn't afford to do it any longer). I volunteer at the school to fund raise for items the school needs (since the school board couldn't afford to do it any longer). I volunteer for the Lions Club doing projects or raising funds for projects such as playgrounds (since the town couldn't afford to do it any longer)
All these things I do in my spare time that my father never did because his generation just borrowed the money to run or build schools, rinks, golf courses, playgrounds and fire departments. Not only did he (and those of his generation) stick their kids and grand kids with the bill but they are the first ones to complain if the school, fire hall, playground or arena isn't up to standard and blame it on the younger generation. And, of course, they expect a discount on their golf membership.
They are...

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So your dad was a lazy, selfish prick. Not everybody's was. I have done a lot of volunteering to and on average less than 10% of the people in any give area do. At one time I was on half a dozen committees and it was always the same people who showed up. And I am a Mac techy and I will not have a cell phone, iPhone, an iPod or iPad. I have a land line because I hate phones and I use my answering machine to screen my calls.
 
JLM
#120
Quote: Originally Posted by CliffyView Post

The ones doing all the complaining are you and the 40+ year olds. Bunch of whiny, sniveling little "poor me" brats.
The only reason the cost of living is so high is because people today don't know the difference between need and want. We didn't have 5% of the electronic crap people have today, we didn't have designer clothes or live in big houses. Our parents didn't drive us to sporting events, dancing or music lessons. We didn't have a TV in every freakin' room. We didn't eat out at restaurants more than once or twice a year. We didn't have more than one car or a house in the country. We wore hand me down clothes. You guys were spoiled and then you spoiled your own kids even worse and now you are whining about it? Grow a pair!

Good one, Cliff, you've told the whining, snivelling brat better than I ever could.
 

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