Prezza hates foreign muck.

Blackleaf
#31
Quote: Originally Posted by Toro


The English have given the world many wonderful things. Food isn't one of them.

We gave the world the hot dog - one of America's favourite foods.

That's why I made a mistake when I called a hotdog "foreign muck."

And the same Englishman who invented the hot dog also invented baseball scoring cards and was the first person in the world to drink fizzy pop (or soda, as you call it) through a straw.
 
Blackleaf
#32
Quote: Originally Posted by cortez

though in all honesty british food NOW consists of the many interesting dishes that immigrants bring to england with them such curry based food-- which is of course -- yummy



Many of the foods that you think aren't English, but were imported into England, ARE English.

Take chicken tikka masala. Many people think that chicken tikka masala, which is Britain's favourite food, is an Indian food. But it was invented in England.

Quote:

im waiting for blackleaf to tell us that the english make the best red wines ........

I don't know about red wine, but we're pretty good at making drinks such as gin.
 
Blackleaf
#33
Quote: Originally Posted by cortez

im waiting for blackleaf to tell us that the english make the best red wines ........



English sparkling fizzes with delight at top honour
June 29, 2005
Adam Lechmere



An English wine has been voted the the world's best sparkling wine against competition from 55 countries.

The RidgeView Merret Bloomsbury 2002 took World Wide Trophy for Best Sparkling Wine at the 2005 International Wine and Spirit Competition.

The Bloomsbury's sister wine, the Merret Fitzrovia 2002 Rose, won Bronze at this year's Decanter World Wine Awards.

RidgeView is based near the South Downs village of Ditchling in Sussex, in southern England.

The family-run enterprise is no stranger to awards. In the last five years it has won 44 medals and 12 trophies in international and national competitions, including English Wine of the Year in 2000 and 2002.

Last year it won two silver medals in prestigious French competitions. The estate currently produces between 40,000 and 50,000 bottles a year, specialising in the three classic Champagne grape varieties Chardonnay, Pinot Noir and Pinot Meunier. The Bloomsbury is a blend of the three.

It has just been given a 50,000 government grant which it will use to double production.

The recent 'Best Sparkling Wine' award was won in the Sparkling Wine category, in which Champagne does not compete. But, marketing manager Mardi Roberts told decanter.com, it was up against world-renowned labels from California, Spain, Italy, New Zealand, Australia. It was 'an unbelievable success,' she said.

RidgeView wines are available at Waitrose, the Sunday Times Wine Club, The Wine Society and specialists.

decanter.com
 
Blackleaf
#34
Quote:

The English have given the world many wonderful things. Food isn't one of them

God, I'm loving this.



Americans owe their famous hot dog to Midland milkman

Feb 26 2006




By Paul Cole


AMERICA'S best-kept secret is out. The hot dog was invented not by a New Yorker but by ... a milkman from the Midlands.

New research reveals that Harry M Stevens came up with the snack that has become a byword for all things American.

The hot dog is up there with bagels and burgers, Uncle Sam and Mickey Mouse as the very essence of the good ol' U S of A.

But the Yanks owe it all to Harry, who was born 150 years ago in Derby, where he delivered milk for a living.

Archivists in the town are so convinced their records are right that they're preparing to celebrate the anniversary with a series of events - and even plan to add Midland relish to America's National Hotdog Day on July 21.

What's more, Harry invented the baseball scoring cards still used to this day in the States, and there's a suggestion that he was also the first man to drink fizzy pop through a straw.

"Everyone assumes that the hot dog was invented by an American," said Marion Nixon, the woman in charge of promoting Derby as a tourist destination.

"But that's not the case at all.

"Harry has probably made more of an impact on the United States than any other Englishman, but he's been an unsung hero whose Midland roots have never been properly appreciated."

Family tree records show that Harry, born in 1856, was the eldest son of James Stevens, a foreman on Midland Railway Locomotive in Derby.

He grew up to become a caterer in his hometown supplying, amongst others, Normanton Barracks with milk.

Those who knew him said he had a knack of inventing things. In the 1880s, Harry and his family upped sticks and emigrated to Ohio, where he realised there was money to be made from catering at large sporting events in the US.

"Hot dogs were the result of a chilly April day at New York City's Polo Ground in 1901," said tourism chief Marion.

"By now, Harry already had the catering concession for major league baseball games - but he was losing money trying to sell ice cream and cold soda. Nobody wanted them.

"Wanting something to warm the fans up, he sent out his salesmen to buy up all of the 'dachshund' sausages they could find, along with rolls to put them in.

"Then he got his vendors to go round the ground shouting: 'They're red hot. Get your hot dachshund sausages while they're red hot!'

"A newspaper cartoonist named Tad Dorgan - short on ideas and working to a tight deadline - spotted the snack and drew a barking dachshund sausage nestling in a roll.

"Not sure how to spell dachshund, he scrawled the words 'hot dog' on his cartoon instead. The drawing became famous - and another American icon was born!"

Historians believe that sausages had been eaten in bread for centuries but the Derby milkman was first to put frankfurters in a roll and sell them as the famous hot dogs. Following Harry's death in May 1934, generations of the Stevens family maintained his traditions and developed the Harry M Stevens business into a catering giant.

In 1996, Harry's name was back in the headlines, when 166 items of his baseball memorabilia were auctioned off in New York.

They included a photograph of Babe Ruth hitting his 60th home run, inscribed "To my second dad Harry M Stevens from Babe Ruth, December 25th 1927", which sold for 10,000.

But the nostalgic lot that grabbed all the attention was a 1940's stadium hot dog vendor's fitted wicker basket, which fetched 5,000 - Harry Stevens would have been proud.

To mark the 150th birthday of the hot dog pioneer, Derby plans a Sausage and Ale Trail leading visitors on a tour of some of the most mouth-watering bangers and beer in Britain.


And they'll be singing the praises of the town's culinary hero when they set up stall at the British Travel Trade Fair, which runs at Birmingham's NEC on March 1 and 2.



http://icbirmingham.icnetwork.co.uk/...name_page.html
 
#juan
#35
It's not British fish & chips,

unless it is served in a newspaper. If you are truly blessed, you can get part of a headline printed backwards on your fish.
 
tracy
#36
You're proud that an Englishman who emigrated invented hotdogs? Hotdogs are gross.
 
zoofer
#37
Quote:

Tracy wrote:
.... Speaking of.... I'm going to order some takeout.

Takeout what?

Not my fave, BullyBeef and Cabbage Pizza?
:P
 
FiveParadox
#38
I used to eat hot dogs. Stupid vegetarianism. Haha.
 
tracy
#39
Quote: Originally Posted by zoofer

Quote:

Tracy wrote:
.... Speaking of.... I'm going to order some takeout.

Takeout what?

Not my fave, BullyBeef and Cabbage Pizza?
:P

Ew Nope, I had chinese food and it was good
 
I think not
#40
This thread is hilarious, posters arguing over which food is better or worse. It's like saying the cheeseburger is an American food, despite the fact it is probably eaten in every corner of the globe. The only way you will be able to indentify the type of food in various countries (I mean historically) is by the cooking practices and traditions. Much of the food is influenced based on the availability of the ingredients or at least that was the case in the past.

Each area of Canada and the US for example has been influenced by immigration and as I mentioned earlier the availability of ingredients. Take Kentucky for example where they had an abundance of corn, beans and pigs. New England which relied heavily on fish, lobster, cranberries and even maple syrup. Pennsylvania, where a large Dutch immigration has settled emphasize on the seven sweets and seven sours.

Personally, I have never had a problem with any food wherever I have travelled, and that includes Britain, France, Germany etc..

Is there any food nowadays you can't get in any country you go to? Short of religious restrictions, I think not.
 
JoeyB
#41
I could eat Roast Beef and Yorkie puds all day....

wouldn't mind some now for Breakfast actually... along with my bacon & eggs, pancakes and 1/2 a bottle of maple syrup.
 
I think not
#42
Quote: Originally Posted by JoeyB

along with my bacon & eggs, pancakes and 1/2 a bottle of maple syrup.

Mmmm... the hell with breakfast, I eat that anytime of day.
 
cortez
#43
Quote: Originally Posted by Blackleaf

Many of the foods that you think aren't English, but were imported into England, ARE English.

Take chicken tikka masala. Many people think that chicken tikka masala, which is Britain's favourite food, is an Indian food. But it was invented in England.


Yeah, by Bangladeshi chefs........
 
Knoss
#44
I live in Saskatchewan and we rarely eat exotic food. Forget foreign we grow practically everything every exotic food is made from, durum wheat, beans, spices, but we rarely eat mustard or corriander or pasta we do eat our own beef though.
 
Knoss
#45
Quote:

I could eat Roast Beef and Yorkie puds all day....

wouldn't mind some now for Breakfast actually... along with my bacon & eggs, pancakes and 1/2 a bottle of maple syrup.

how about beef bacon pancakes and poplar syrup
 
The conductor
#46
Yes English food can be greasy, heavy, fattening, etc.
But go to a good English pub and have a few pints and chow down with pub food. Explode later.
Some of it is okay but some of it is just wrong.
Curry-based food is very heavily consumed in the U.K.
Curry and chips are just great for a quick snack.
Especially with Vindaloo sauce.
 
Daz_Hockey
#47
ahahaha!!!Vin de Aloo!!!! (that's wine and potatoes to the unwashed) actually invented by the portugues in Goa, India..I know....I've been there.

"English" food isnt actually very different at all to Canadian, American, Australian or any other english speaking countries food...although you cant buy a decent (not that, that word should EVER be used to describe em) Sauage in an American Supermarket...trust me, I've tried Walmart, Safeway, Alberton's etc...I just cant find em

Curry in England is about as indian as I am, it's muck it really is
 
The conductor
#48
If you live the States try www.britishbacon.com.
They have great sausages and bacon from North Carolina.
 
Toro
#49
English food sucks.
 
Daz_Hockey
#50
US Food aint any better Toro, but then I suppose you could say there is a great variety of different food in the states...well guess what....so too in the UK....

Oh yeah?..like ur Tomato Ketchup?...that's english
Like ur Hotdos?......that's English
Like ur Peach Cobbler.....that's English
how about ur Pancakes, ur Biscuit, ect, etc, ect...my point is this, yes English food isnt brill, but then neither's most in the anglo world so please dont knock it too much
 
#juan
#51
You haven't tasted really bad food until you've had a "chicken fried steak" . What a thing to do to a good steak. Generally I don't mind American cooking but it can be good or bad like every other cooking.

BTW Daz Our grocery store in Nanaimo sell British banger sausage that is very close to the original "bangers and mash" from jolly old.
 
Daz_Hockey
#52
hehehehe I HAVE tasted "chicken fried steak" as it happens...in that giant Pyramid in Vegas on an "all you can eat" deal.....jeez it's bad lol

I think someone said "Sauages and Politics are very similar, and those who like both should never allow themselves to see either made"

cant remember who said that...but it's very true
 

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