Brexit bill: Parliament clears way for talks with EU


Blackleaf
#1
Parliament has passed the Brexit bill, paving the way for the government to trigger Article 50 so the UK can leave the European Union.

Peers backed down over the issues of EU residency rights and a meaningful vote on the final Brexit deal after their objections were overturned by MPs.

The bill is expected to receive Royal Assent and become law on Tuesday.

This means Theresa May is free to push the button on withdrawal talks - now expected in the last week of March.

Brexit bill: Parliament clears way for talks with EU



The bill is expected to receive Royal Assent and become law on Tuesday

Parliament has passed the Brexit bill, paving the way for the government to trigger Article 50 so the UK can leave the European Union.

Peers backed down over the issues of EU residency rights and a meaningful vote on the final Brexit deal after their objections were overturned by MPs.

The bill is expected to receive Royal Assent and become law on Tuesday.

This means Theresa May is free to push the button on withdrawal talks - now expected in the last week of March.

The result came as Scotland's First Minister Nicola Sturgeon announced that she intended to hold a second referendum on Scottish independence at a time when Brexit negotiations are expected to be reaching a conclusion.

Ms Sturgeon said she wanted a vote to be held between autumn 2018 and spring 2019 - but there is speculation that Mrs May will reject the idea of the referendum being held before the Brexit process is completed.

That Brexit process is set to take two years from when Mrs May invokes Article 50, which formally gives the EU notice of the UK's intention to leave.

Brexit Secretary David Davis said. "We are now on the threshold of the most important negotiation for our country in a generation."


Brexit Secretary David Davis said Parliament had backed the government


The Queen is now set to approve the Brexit bill

The EU Withdrawal Bill (external - login to view) was passed unamended late on Monday after peers voted by 274 votes to 118 not to challenge the Commons again over the issue of whether Parliament should have a veto on the terms of exit.

The House of Lords also agreed not to reinsert guarantees over the status of EU residents in the UK into the bill, with the government winning the vote by a margin of 274 votes to 135.

Later analysis of the division list for the first Lords vote on EU citizens' rights to remain in the UK showed that 25 Labour peers sided with the Lib Dems, including former cabinet minister Lord Mandelson.

Earlier, the government had comfortably won votes on the issues in the Commons, with only a handful of Tory MPs rebelling.

Corbyn to 'challenge plans'

The votes came after Brexit minister Lord Bridges of Headley warned that now was not the time to "return to the fray" by inserting "terms and conditions" in the legislation.

Labour's spokeswoman Baroness Hayter of Kentish Town attacked the Lib Dems for not being responsible and "falsely raising" people's hopes on the rights of EU citizens living in the UK.

Liberal Democrat Lord Oates said the government had failed to make concessions over the position of EU nationals living in the UK and called on peers to insist on changes.

Brexit campaigners welcomed the "clear mandate" given to the UK government ahead of the start of official negotiations.

"Now, it's time to go into these negotiations with some ambition and support the government, so it can secure the very best deal - one that is good for the whole UK, and good for the EU too," said Tory MP and former minister Dominic Raab.

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn said the rejection of the Lords amendments was "deeply disappointing" but insisted the opposition would continue to press for the rights of EU nationals to be prioritised and for the maximum parliamentary oversight of the process.

He tweeted: "Labour at every stage will challenge govt plans for a bargain basement Brexit with our alternative that puts jobs & living standards first."



Brexit bill: Parliament clears way for talks with EU - BBC News (external - login to view)
 
White_Unifier
#2
Finally.
 
Blackleaf
#3


httpwwwyoutubecomwatchvvpEWpKDl7M

 
White_Unifier
#4
I hope it doesn't drag on for the next two years. Stop dragging your feet and get her done!
 
Blackleaf
#5
We voted out, so just walk away Mrs May: RICHARD LITTLEJOHN says the PM may have the zeal of a Brexit convert but she hasn't shown much urgency in triggering Article 50

By Richard Littlejohn for the Daily Mail
14 March 2017

The 19th century diplomat Talleyrand said of the Bourbons that they had learned nothing and forgotten nothing.

After the restoration of the monarchy following the fall of Napoleon, the French royal household reverted to behaving just as appallingly as they had before the revolution, oblivious to the fact that they were sowing the seeds of their own ultimate extinction.

Talleyrand could have been describing the behaviour of Britain’s modern political class. Their reaction to the biggest popular revolt this country has ever seen has been to carry on regardless, to make Brexit all about them.


The reaction of Britain's political class to the biggest popular revolt this country has ever seen has been to carry on regardless, to make Brexit all about them, writes Richard Littlejohn

Even when Article 50 is finally triggered, setting in train Britain’s departure from the EU, most MPs and peers will still be refusing to heed the lesson of the referendum.

This wasn’t just a vote against continuing to belong to a remote, anti-democratic, sclerotic superstate. It was an overwhelming expression of no confidence in those who were either elected or appointed to serve us.

For far too long they have cynically pursued their own self-serving agendas. Even now there are those who are hell-bent on derailing Brexit, in defiance of the clearly expressed will of the majority of the British people.

They resort to obstructionism and sophistry to further their ends. I can’t be the only person who reaches for the sick bag whenever a resentful Remainer tries to tell us what people really meant when they voted Leave — as if we’re all too stupid to know what we were doing.

No one voted for a ‘hard’ Brexit, we’re told. Yes they did. The customs union wasn’t on the ballot paper. So what? The British people voted to leave the EU and all its works. Full stop.

Certainly a trade deal which satisfies both sides would be welcome. But if one isn’t on the table, then we should just walk away. Worst case we fall back on World Trade Organisation rules and deal with the EU on exactly the same terms as other major economies such as China and America.

Remainers talk emotively and disingenuously about ‘falling off a cliff’, as if we’re going to be prevented from doing any business in Europe.


London Mayor and Remain campaigner Sadiq Khan said the economy will ‘fall off a cliff’ if Britain is forced to quit the EU single market

They will say and do anything in their shameless efforts to wreck the Brexit process, even posing as doughty defenders of democracy. They’re now trying to insist Parliament must have the final say before we part company with the EU.

It’s a pity they weren’t so resolute in defence of Parliamentary sovereignty over the past four decades, when both the Commons and Lords were rubber-stamping thousands of European directives into British law, without any debate or scrutiny whatsoever.

They claim the result wasn’t valid because ‘only’ 52 per cent voted Leave. Among those expressing this view is Tony Blair, who in 2005 won just 35.2 per cent of the vote at the General Election, but was rewarded with a 66 seat majority.

Two thirds of Britain voted for other parties. Labour also lost the popular vote in England to the Conservatives. But I don’t remember anyone claiming Blair shouldn’t be allowed to form a government. Or demanding that England should leave the United Kingdom, rather than be ruled by a Labour Party propped up by Scottish MPs.

With depressing predictability, Wee Burney has now announced that she is seeking a second independence referendum, because Scotland voted Remain.


Remainers including Tony Blair claim the EU referendum result wasn’t valid because ‘only’ 52 per cent voted Leave

She’s grandstanding, of course, but she should be careful what she wishes for. Frankly, much as we value the Union, the English are sick of being lectured by this tiresome woman with her chippy grievances and would cheerfully wave goodbye.

Missing you already, hen.

The same goes for the Siren Sisters, Anna Soubry and Nicky Morgan, who have taken up permanent residence in radio and TV studios, wailing about the catastrophic consequences of Brexit.

If they are so upset about losing EU citizenship, they could always go and live there. And the House of Lords might have bowed to the inevitable, but not before trying to make Brexit as difficult as possible. The whole rotten edifice should be abolished after the next election.

All of this could have been foreseen. Far more worrying is the behaviour of those charged with delivering Brexit. Mother Theresa might pretend to have the zeal of the convert but she hasn’t shown much enthusiasm or urgency in firing the starting gun.

She may be triggering Article 50, but it’s taken her nine long months. It should have been triggered the day after the referendum, just as Call Me Dave promised.


Frankly, much as we value the Union, the English are sick of being lectured by Nicola Sturgeon with her chippy grievances and would cheerfully wave goodbye, writes Richard Littlejohn

What has always bothered me is that apart from the Three Brexiteers — Boris, Davis and Fox — most of the Cabinet was in the Remain camp. How committed is Spreadsheet Phil, for instance?

He certainly hasn’t impressed as Chancellor, bungling his first Budget in spectacular fashion, and doesn’t seem to have made any firm plans for what happens when we leave the EU.

If the Prime Minister couldn’t see that her Chancellor’s tax increases were going to hammer natural Tory voters, then how much faith can we have in her ability to battle for Britain when the going gets tough in Brussels? I certainly wouldn’t trust Hammond to negotiate on our behalf, especially after his dismal performance last week.

Read more: RICHARD LITTLEJOHN: We voted out, so walk away Mrs May | Daily Mail Online
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter (external - login to view) | DailyMail on Facebook (external - login to view)
 
no new posts