Since NAFTA there has been no change in Mexican Poverty


tay
#1
Chris Wade reached into the darkness to silence his blaring alarm clock. It was 4:30 on a frigid winter morning in Warren, Ohio, and outside a fresh layer of snow blanketed the yard.

Thank God, Wade thought to himself. He would be able to get out his plow and make some quick cash.

Money never used to be a problem for Wade, 47, who owned a house with a pool back when he worked at Delphi Automotive, a parts manufacturer that for years was one of the biggest employers in this wooded stretch of northeastern Ohio. But 10 years after taking a buyout as part of Delphi’s ongoing shift of production out of the United States and into Mexico and China, the house and the pool were gone.

Berta Alicia Lopez, 54, is the new face of Delphi. On a recent chilly morning, she woke before sunrise on the outskirts of Juarez, Mexico, and caught an unheated bus that dropped her an hour away at the Delphi plant.

Lopez earns $1 an hour assembling cables and electronics that will eventually be installed into vehicles — the same work that Wade once did for $30 an hour. A farmer’s daughter who grew up in an impoverished stretch of rural Mexico, Lopez is proud to own a used Toyota sedan and a concrete block house.

She frequently thanks God for the work, even if it is in a town troubled by drug violence, even if she doesn’t see many possibilities for earning more or advancing.

The two workers live 1,800 miles and a border apart and have never met. But their stories embody the massive economic shift that has accompanied the rise of free trade.

In the United States, that shift has contributed to the loss of jobs that once helped workers buy homes, pay for health insurance and send children to college. In Mexico, it brought jobs — though they didn’t create the kind of broad, middle-class prosperity they once had in America.

But the real legacy of NAFTA, which took effect in 1994, is more complicated.

Nobody disputes that the loss of manufacturing has left a bruising mark in parts of the U.S., especially in places like the Rust Belt, where lower paying service industry jobs are increasingly replacing middle class factory positions. But many economists say changes in technology, along with competition with China, are more to blame than NAFTA.

The period of steepest decline in manufacturing jobs, which fell from 17 million to 11 million between 2000 and 2010, is substantially attributable to the free import of goods manufactured more cheaply in China

South of the border, free trade has indeed helped modernize Mexico by creating millions of jobs since the passage of NAFTA, boosting investment flow and helping to diversify the country’s manufacturing sector. Mexican workers now help build everything from Whirlpool washing machines to Bombardier jets.

But wages have remained low, so that Mexico remains attractive to manufacturers who might otherwise be tempted to locate in China or elsewhere in Asia. Since NAFTA went into effect, there has been no change in the number of Mexicans living below the poverty line — more than half.

more

A tale of two cities: What happened when factory jobs moved from Warren, Ohio, to Juarez, Mexico - LA Times (external - login to view)
 
White_Unifier
#2
Quote: Originally Posted by tayView Post

Chris Wade reached into the darkness to silence his blaring alarm clock. It was 4:30 on a frigid winter morning in Warren, Ohio, and outside a fresh layer of snow blanketed the yard.

Thank God, Wade thought to himself. He would be able to get out his plow and make some quick cash.

Money never used to be a problem for Wade, 47, who owned a house with a pool back when he worked at Delphi Automotive, a parts manufacturer that for years was one of the biggest employers in this wooded stretch of northeastern Ohio. But 10 years after taking a buyout as part of Delphi’s ongoing shift of production out of the United States and into Mexico and China, the house and the pool were gone.

Berta Alicia Lopez, 54, is the new face of Delphi. On a recent chilly morning, she woke before sunrise on the outskirts of Juarez, Mexico, and caught an unheated bus that dropped her an hour away at the Delphi plant.

Lopez earns $1 an hour assembling cables and electronics that will eventually be installed into vehicles — the same work that Wade once did for $30 an hour. A farmer’s daughter who grew up in an impoverished stretch of rural Mexico, Lopez is proud to own a used Toyota sedan and a concrete block house.

She frequently thanks God for the work, even if it is in a town troubled by drug violence, even if she doesn’t see many possibilities for earning more or advancing.

The two workers live 1,800 miles and a border apart and have never met. But their stories embody the massive economic shift that has accompanied the rise of free trade.

In the United States, that shift has contributed to the loss of jobs that once helped workers buy homes, pay for health insurance and send children to college. In Mexico, it brought jobs — though they didn’t create the kind of broad, middle-class prosperity they once had in America.

But the real legacy of NAFTA, which took effect in 1994, is more complicated.

Nobody disputes that the loss of manufacturing has left a bruising mark in parts of the U.S., especially in places like the Rust Belt, where lower paying service industry jobs are increasingly replacing middle class factory positions. But many economists say changes in technology, along with competition with China, are more to blame than NAFTA.

The period of steepest decline in manufacturing jobs, which fell from 17 million to 11 million between 2000 and 2010, is substantially attributable to the free import of goods manufactured more cheaply in China

South of the border, free trade has indeed helped modernize Mexico by creating millions of jobs since the passage of NAFTA, boosting investment flow and helping to diversify the country’s manufacturing sector. Mexican workers now help build everything from Whirlpool washing machines to Bombardier jets.

But wages have remained low, so that Mexico remains attractive to manufacturers who might otherwise be tempted to locate in China or elsewhere in Asia. Since NAFTA went into effect, there has been no change in the number of Mexicans living below the poverty line — more than half.

more

A tale of two cities: What happened when factory jobs moved from Warren, Ohio, to Juarez, Mexico - LA Times (external - login to view)

Of course. With the size of Mexico's population, it will take decades to balance out, but free trade is what gives it that opportunity to do so.
 
bill barilko
#3
What a load of ignorant codswallop!

In Fact Mexico's economy has grown 4%-5% for over 30 years as anyone who's ever visited there knows-all you have to do is look @ their rapidly expanding waistlines to know people are living well.
 
tay
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by bill barilkoView Post

What a load of ignorant codswallop!

In Fact Mexico's economy has grown 4%-5% for over 30 years as anyone who's ever visited there knows-all you have to do is look @ their rapidly expanding waistlines to know people are living well.

You best explain that claim so we can alert all the illegals and tell them to go back, everything's fine..........
 
B00Mer
No Party Affiliation
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by tayView Post

You best explain that claim so we can alert all the illegals and tell them to go back, everything's fine..........

They have been notified.. the Mexican economy is better than Alberta economy. ROFLOL

More Mexicans leaving US than entering, study says (external - login to view) - FauxNews

Pull your head out of your ass tay, Mexico is more Americanized that Canada, if you ever bother to go down there to Mexico City or any tourist area, you would think your in Los Angeles or Miami.
 
Bar Sinister
No Party Affiliation
+1
#6  Top Rated Post
Quote: Originally Posted by B00MerView Post

They have been notified.. the Mexican economy is better than Alberta economy. ROFLOL

More Mexicans leaving US than entering, study says (external - login to view) - FauxNews

Pull your head out of your ass tay, Mexico is more Americanized that Canada, if you ever bother to go down there to Mexico City or any tourist area, you would think your in Los Angeles or Miami.

I've been to Mexico City. I would never mistake it for any part of Canada. That said, the Mexico of 2017 seems much more prosperous than the Mexico I visited in the 1970s.
 
B00Mer
No Party Affiliation
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by Bar SinisterView Post

I've been to Mexico City. I would never mistake it for any part of Canada. That said, the Mexico of 2017 seems much more prosperous than the Mexico I visited in the 1970s.

Sorry didn't say Canada, Americanized.. Mexico City looks a lot like Los Angeles..

I wouldn't say Canada looks much Los Angeles.. more like a frozen waste land with strip clubs on every corner and dam good beer.
 
Bar Sinister
No Party Affiliation
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by B00MerView Post

Sorry didn't say Canada, Americanized.. Mexico City looks a lot like Los Angeles..

I wouldn't say Canada looks much Los Angeles.. more like a frozen waste land with strip clubs on every corner and dam good beer.

Wouldn't know. Never been to a strip joint and I don't drink beer.
 
tay
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by B00MerView Post

They have been notified.. the Mexican economy is better than Alberta economy. ROFLOL

More Mexicans leaving US than entering, study says (external - login to view) - FauxNews

Pull your head out of your ass tay, Mexico is more Americanized that Canada, if you ever bother to go down there to Mexico City or any tourist area, you would think your in Los Angeles or Miami.

Your comments are confusing at best. How do you derive that the Mexican economy is better than Alberta's?

And what's the relevance of parts of Mexico being more Americanized (whatever that means) then Canada have to do with their economy?

And no, I have not been to Mexico City but I have been to several east coast tourist areas and went into the towns behind the tourist areas and it's not good. I only went during the day to be safe (per the taxi driver) but if the tourists did that they would get the real impact of Mexican poverty. I took at taxi to the main town. It was interesting. The clash of streets lined with, well I wouldn't call them houses, more like large rooms were pretty desperate looking as I went past on my way to what I would call their 'high end' stores, furniture, art, jewelry and they all had armed guards outside of them. I have no idea what kind of guns they were holding but they were rifles. And every half hour or so a large police pickup with 4 or so cops would cruise down the street. I went into the art and furniture stores because I was looking for ideas. I suspected that these store exist to supply the hotels in the tourist areas

I also went to their version of a grocery store because we had a kitchen in our room and I thought I would see what they had. The store was clean etc., obviously heavy on Mexican food, but the oddest thing I noticed was they did not have refrigerated milk. It came in boxes, like juice boxes. I didn't buy any.

I bought a few things and they had over 10 cashiers open and they all had these kids 10-14 years old bagging. Turns out they were from an orphanage related to the Catholics and were working for free, dependent on tips.

Another time when I drove along the border from Brownsville making my way to Flagstaff and we could see the shacks on the hillsides on the Mexican side.

Mexican governments are one of the most corrupt around for decades and have done nothing to help the masses.

Yes I'll pull my ass out of my head soon..........


While much has been said about its impact on U.S. job loss (external - login to view) and eroding labor conditions, some of the most severe impacts of Nafta have been felt south of the border.

Nafta has cut a path of destruction through Mexico. Since the agreement went into force in 1994, the country’s annual per capita growth flat-lined to an average of just
1.2 percent (external - login to view) -- one of the lowest in the hemisphere. Its real wage has declined and unemployment is up. (external - login to view)

As heavily subsidized U.S. corn and other staples poured into Mexico, producer prices dropped and small farmers found themselves unable to make a living. Some two million (external - login to view) have been forced to leave their farms since Nafta. At the same time, consumer food prices rose, notably the cost of the omnipresent tortilla.

As a result,
20 million Mexicans live in “food poverty” (external - login to view). Twenty-five percent (external - login to view) of the population does not have access to basic food and one-fifth of Mexican children suffer from malnutrition. Transnational industrial corridors in rural areas have contaminated rivers and sickened the population and typically, women bear the heaviest impact.

Not all of Mexico’s problems can be laid at Nafta’s doorstep. But many have a direct causal link. The agreement drastically restructured Mexico’s economy and closed off other development paths by prohibiting protective tariffs, support for strategic sectors and financial controls.

more

www.nytimes.com/… (external - login to view)


In a country with a daily minimum wage of 73 pesos, or about $5, that rate is still far more lucrative than many alternatives. But even with a weekly salary of 1,250 pesos, Alejandra Bartolomé, 26, cannot afford more than the home she and her family illegally cobbled together on the side of a four-lane Tijuana highway — part of an informal settlement where old garage doors and factory refuse substitute for bricks and mortar.

more

www.thespec.com/... (external - login to view)
 
Johnnny
No Party Affiliation
#10
Mexico has OXXO Stations and those gas stations are enough to carry the Mexican economy....
 
Curious Cdn
Conservative
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by JohnnnyView Post

Mexico has OXXO Stations and those gas stations are enough to carry the Mexican economy....

You can create an economy by selling gas back and forth to each other?

University of Calgary?
 
B00Mer
No Party Affiliation
#12
Quote: Originally Posted by Bar SinisterView Post

Wouldn't know. Never been to a strip joint and I don't drink beer.

...and you live in Canada, hard to believe. One on every corner, worse than Macs Milk..

https://www.tuscl.net/r.php?id=3 (external - login to view)

I guess when you have 16 hours of darkness, and -40 below.

-- not much else to do but drink and fukk..
 
Curious Cdn
Conservative
+1
#13
Quote: Originally Posted by B00MerView Post

...and you live in Canada, hard to believe. One on every corner, worse than Macs Milk..

https://www.tuscl.net/r.php?id=3 (external - login to view)

I guess when you have 16 hours of darkness, and -40 below.

-- not much else to do but drink and fukk..

We have Tim Horton's on each corner, here.

You don't want to watch "Bovine Betty" take her clothes off, trust me.
 
B00Mer
No Party Affiliation
#14
 
coldstream
+1
#15
NAFTA was a con game, by trading and financial cartels.. as is all Free Trade.

It's profit equation demands a desperate, captive workforce without any power, and, 'freedom' for corporations to gouge workers and countries to capitulate to subsistence wages, dismantling of fair labour laws and unions, while allowing unfettered access to first world markets to charge first world prices.

Of course that access puts them under no obligation to support those economies with their payrolls. It is a shell game.. and mechanism that will run down by way of its own contradictions and inertia. The Free Trade lobbies' promises of equitably shared wealth were a lie.

The reality is what you see now, with a tiny fraction of the population becoming grotesquely rich, taxed at a fraction of honest work.. everyone else, in producing and consuming markets, struggling to make ends meet, without security, pensions, benefits in a disintegrating work place.

You see that happening now. If Trump doesn't dismantle NAFTA his entire platform will fail.. all his promises will vanish like dust in the wind.
Last edited by coldstream; 9 hours ago at 12:52 PM..
 

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