Saudi Arabia declares all atheists are terrorists


tay
#1
In a string of royal decrees and an overarching new piece of legislation to deal with terrorism generally, the Saudi King Abdullah has clamped down on all forms of political dissent and protests that could "harm public order".

The new laws have largely been brought in to combat the growing number of Saudis travelling to take part in the civil war in Syria, who have previously returned with newfound training and ideas about overthrowing the monarchy.

To that end, King Abdullah issued Royal Decree 44, which criminalises "participating in hostilities outside the kingdom" with prison sentences of between three and 20 years, Human Rights Watch said.

Yet last month further regulations were issued by the Saudi interior ministry, identifying a broad list of groups which the government considers to be terrorist organisations - including the Muslim Brotherhood.

Article one of the new provisions defines terrorism as "calling for atheist thought in any form, or calling into question the fundamentals of the Islamic religion on which this country is based".

Joe Stork, deputy Middle East and North Africa director of Human Rights Watch, said: "Saudi authorities have never tolerated criticism of their policies, but these recent laws and regulations turn almost any critical expression or independent association into crimes of terrorism.

"These regulations dash any hope that King Abdullah intends to open a space for peaceful dissent or independent groups," Mr Stork said.

Human Rights Watch said the new regulations were also a setback to campaigns for the protection and release of a number of prominent human rights activists currently jailed in Saudi Arabia. It said Waleed Abu al-Khair and Mikhlif al-Shammari recently lost appeals and will soon begin three-month and five-year respective sentences for criticizing Saudi authorities.

The organisation said the new "terrorism" provisions contain language that prosecutors and judges are already using to prosecute and convict independent activists and peaceful dissidents.




Saudi Arabia declares all atheists are terrorists in new law to crack down on political dissidents - Middle East - World - The Independent (external - login to view)
 
WLDB
No Party Affiliation
+3
#2  Top Rated Post
Damn, where will I spend my vacations now?
 
mentalfloss
+1 / -2
#3
Finally - something Muslims and Christians have in common.
 
DaSleeper
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalflossView Post

Finally - something Muslims and Christians have in common.

Christians consider atheists to be illegal and/or terrorists?
 
Liberalman
#5
More sprinkles and dunks will make it better
 
EagleSmack
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalflossView Post

Finally - something Muslims and Christians have in common.

 
mentalfloss
#7
You always post gifs from the same show.
 
Zipperfish
No Party Affiliation
#8
There's news and then there's olds. This is olds.
 
EagleSmack
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalflossView Post

You always post gifs from the same show.

No I don't



Cheers! (you fail)
 
shadowshiv
Free Thinker
+1
#10
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalflossView Post

You always post gifs from the same show.

Who cares if it's from a good show (which it was)?
 
SLM
No Party Affiliation
#11
Uh huh, and here I'd been thinking that terrorists are people who, well, terrorize others. What the hell was I thinking?

Quote: Originally Posted by shadowshivView Post

Who cares if it's from a good show (which it was)?

Some post because they have a criticism, others because they just have to criticize.
 
tay
#12
Good luck with that;




Saudi princess calls for uprising against ruling regime




One of the daughters of Saudi King Abdullah has called on people across the kingdom to rise against the ruling regime.

The eldest daughter, Sahar, who is under house arrest along with three of her sisters in the city of Jeddah, said in a video message that victory is theirs.

“Greetings to martyrs and to free men in jail. It is an honor for me to learn the meaning of freedom, rights and dignity from you revolutionary people,” the 42-year-old Saudi princess said.

“We promise to follow in your footsteps and not to let go of your hands. God’s hand will be above us. We learn determination from Ayatollah Nimr al-Nimr, the Sheikh of free men. For this reason, we will press ahead on the path by our own will,” she added.

She was referring to prominent Shia cleric Sheikh Nimr al-Nimr, who was arrested over calls for the release of political prisoners.

Sheikh Nimr was attacked, injured and arrested by Saudi security forces en route to his house in the Qatif region of Saudi Arabia’s Eastern Province in July 8, 2012.

“And we will become victorious with faith in God. Good luck, you who have honored us by raising the flags of freedom. Your sisters, Sahar and Jawahir,” Sahar stated in the message.

Sahar, Maha, Hala and Jawaher Al Saud are daughters of Saudi King Abdullah bin Abdulaziz, who are reportedly being confined against their will.

On April 20, Sahar told the New York Post in a phone call that “we are cut off and isolated and alone.”

“We are hostages. No one can come see us, and we can’t go see anyone. Our father is responsible and his sons, our half-brothers, are both culprits in this tragedy,” she added.

The princess described their living quarters as “ruins,” saying that she and her sisters are beaten by sticks by men including their “half-brothers.”


video


http://www.presstv.ir/detail/2014/04/26/360109/saudi-princess-calls-for-uprising/ (external - login to view)
 
Twila
+1
#13
Saudi Arabia is loosing control of it's population. Thanks to social media, people there are finding out that they are not alone in thinking the laws binding them are not right.

Saudi Arabia Doesn't Want Posts Like This On Facebook. That's Why We're Posting It. (external - login to view)
 
eh1eh
+2
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalflossView Post

Finally - something Muslims and Christians have in common.

Indeed.

Religion is designed to control minds for the benefit of a ruling class.

They are all exactly the same. The doctrines and facades vary but they are all dis-indigenous power grubbing elites.
 
Retired_Can_Soldier
#15
Quote: Originally Posted by eh1ehView Post

Indeed.

Religion is designed to control minds for the benefit of a ruling class.

They are all exactly the same. The doctrines and facades vary but they are all dis-indigenous power grubbing elites.

Really? A bit over the top I'd say. Many religions have modernized their thinking while others are still playing in the primordial ooze.
 
B00Mer
Republican
-1
#16
Why do we still buy oil from this backward misogynistic Wahhabi nutbars?
 
eh1eh
+1
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by Retired_Can_SoldierView Post

Really? A bit over the top I'd say. Many religions have modernized their thinking while others are still playing in the primordial ooze.


Maybe a little exaggerated but I see no other reason for religion to exist.
I guess my thinking may be a little fixed. I'd like to see some actual change not
just a pope that says to not bother with the people that don't conform, for example.
 
gerryh
#18
and then there are the many westerners that consider all Muslims to be terrorists.
 
Count_Lothian
#19




wonder what this guy thinks
 
tay
#20
Saudi Arabia Tries to Stop Center for Inquiry From Delivering Statement at Human Rights Council








This morning at the United Nations Human Rights Council in Geneva, Saudi Arabia tried three times to stop the Center for Inquiry (CFI) from delivering a statement (external - login to view) criticizing the country for its human rights violations.

Our statement, delivered by volunteer representative Josephine Macintosh, condemned Saudi Arabia's restrictions on freedom of religion, belief, and expression, highlighting the cases of jailed rights activists Raif Badawi and Waleed Abu al-Khair. We also raised the obvious tension between Saudi Arabia's human rights practices and its membership on the UN Human Rights Council.


Saudi Arabia interrupted Macintosh three separate times to complain that her statement was "unacceptable" and "completely outside" the parameters of debate.


Ultimately, however, the Saudi efforts were denied. Four member states Canada, France, Ireland, and the United States -- spoke out in support of Center for Inquiry's right to deliver the statement. Even more to the point, UN Human Rights Council Vice President Katerina Sequensova responded that "speakers are expected to raise issues or comment on human rights situations that require the Council's attention, including a human rights situation at a country level." She informed Saudi Arabia that it should use the mechanism which allows the country the right to reply.


Unsurprisingly, Saudi Arabia did not use its right of reply which suggests it was interested only in intimidating CFI from calling attention to the cases of Badawi and al-Khair, and noting the hypocrisy of Saudi Arabia being a member of the UN Human Rights Council while denying basic human rights to its citizens.

You can download our statement here (external - login to view) (PDF).




Saudi Arabia Tries to Stop Center for Inquiry From Delivering Statement at Human Rights Council | Center for Inquiry (external - login to view)
 
Blackleaf
+2
#21
Those atheists - who are good are calling people with religious beliefs, especially Christians, all the nasty names under the Sun - can dish it out but they can't bloody take it. They certainly don't like it up 'em.
 
Tecumsehsbones
+3
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by BlackleafView Post

They certainly don't like it up 'em.

You, by contrast, clearly just love it up you.
 
Corduroy
+2
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by mentalflossView Post

You always post gifs from the same show.

 
Blackleaf
+1
#24
Quote: Originally Posted by TecumsehsbonesView Post

You, by contrast, clearly just love it up you.


Yep. Typical tolerant atheist. Proves my point.
 
Twila
+1
#25
It's funny how it's always one group pointing their fingers at another group. Either the Atheists are the major problem or the theists are the major problem.
 
Sal
No Party Affiliation
+1
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by TwilaView Post

It's funny how it's always one group pointing their fingers at another group. Either the Atheists are the major problem or the theists are the major problem.

I'd say both, as I am neither...I'm starting a third group...

it's all about groups these days and being a part of one, and even if you hate the other guy, he's in your group...ya have to defend him...or at least put down the other group on his behalf

it's like we've all descended to some level of primary behaviour
 
lone wolf
Free Thinker
#27
Quote: Originally Posted by WLDBView Post

Damn, where will I spend my vacations now?

A smaller beach with bigger water?

Question: If you're the Pope, are you considered atheist - being non-Islam and all that
 
SLM
No Party Affiliation
+1
#28
Quote: Originally Posted by TwilaView Post

It's funny how it's always one group pointing their fingers at another group. Either the Atheists are the major problem or the theists are the major problem.

Ya wanna know what the real problem is? People.

Civilization would be a heck of a lot more civilized if it wasn't for all the damned people.
 
gopher
No Party Affiliation
+2
#29
Sir:

It has just been my pleasure to read the review of Masters of Deceit, which appears in the March 31 issue of TIME, and I want you to know how much I appreciate this frank appraisal of my book. It is my earnest hope that it will assist in alerting some complacent Americans to the real threat posed by the atheistic Communist movement.


J. Edgar Hoover, FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION, WASHINGTON, D.C.




Fascists think alike don't they ...
 
Grievous
No Party Affiliation
#30
Quote: Originally Posted by gerryhView Post

and then there are the many westerners that consider all Muslims to be terrorists.



I do.
 

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