Books That Should Be Banned In Schools


missile
#1
While generally I am against the banning of any books, there are some that shouldn't be allowed in any school. Books on bombmaking and How to Cheat At Cards are two good example that come to mind.
 
lone wolf
#2
Reefer Madness. From that book you learn just how much the government relies on progaganda to scare you of the bogeyman. Hmm ... on second thought, maybe it's a keeper!

Woof!
 
Mass Effect
#3
I don't think books period should be banned. Once you slap a ban on a book people will be looking for the book more. Banning brings it more to the public attention instead of letting it sit on a shelf untouched.
 
karrie
#4
Personally I think a public library should have any book that the public requests.

But a school library and a public library are not the same thing.
 
DurkaDurka
#5
Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolfView Post

Reefer Madness. From that book you learn just how much the government relies on progaganda to scare you of the bogeyman. Hmm ... on second thought, maybe it's a keeper!

Woof!

The reefer madness educational films are classic, true comedy.
 
lone wolf
#6
Quote: Originally Posted by DurkaDurkaView Post

The reefer madness educational films are classic, true comedy.

I remember.... Made me want to rape, murder and commit meyhem

Woof!
 
DurkaDurka
#7
Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolfView Post

I remember.... Made me want to rape, murder and commit meyhem

Woof!

I bought them on DVD in a Walmart a couple yearss ago for $5.00, money well spent.
 
Locutus
#8
Banning curriculum books or library books?

Wait until the social engineers start banning Huck Finn up here. Soon, everything will be nice and sterilized for your protection.
 
DurkaDurka
#9
Religious texts are about the only books that should be banned from schools in my opinion... they'll do much more damage to children then something of "questionable taste"
 
eh1eh
#10
1984
 
iARTthere4iam
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by eh1ehView Post

1984

Banned? Why? There should be a warning label on it to warn you that it is deeply disturbing, but I would not want it banned.
 
gopher
+1
#12  Top Rated Post
Fanny Hill


 
lone wolf
#13
Why worry? I'm not sure if kids know what a book is any more. Old tech or what?

Woof!
 
iARTthere4iam
#14
Quote: Originally Posted by lone wolfView Post

Why worry? I'm not sure if kids know what a book is any more. Old tech or what?

Woof!

You must be a hundred years old. Rest assured, kids still read. Harry Potter et al show us that reading even among the whippersnappers is alive and well.
 
lone wolf
#15
A hundred? Only feel it sometimes. Most kids (the ones who can be bothered reading) are more sensible than the responsible adults who want to ban books.

Woof!
 
Vereya
#16
I'd ban all the books by Dostoevsky, each and every one of them. Very harmful reading, in my opinion. Especially for teenagers. I read most of his novels at the time when I was 15-19, and now I wish I hadn't done it. If I ever have children, I will make sure they read their first Dostoevsky novel only after they retire.
 
Locutus
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by gopherView Post

Fanny Hill


And Benny Hill too. That degenerate brit.
 
The conductor
#18
Here is a list of banned books from different countries for different reasons.
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_banned_books (external - login to view)
 
gopher
+1
#19
Benny Hill wrote a book?

Somehow, it escaped my attention!
 
Unforgiven
#20
Censorship has a place in our world of freedoms and liberties. Some stuff needs to be banned from all places but a very few, and that select number an area to see why it is that this stuff needs to be removed from public consumption.

For example, kiddie porn and snuff porn. While we talk about the local library we really mean the world wide library in that there isn't really anyone who needs to access this material as there is no benefit at all from viewing it.

And there is the slippery slope. Who picks what is inappropriate, under what criteria, and how do you exempt that from being abused or usurped by those who would tamper with the distribution of information for political gain or empowerment over the public?
 
Niflmir
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by UnforgivenView Post

And there is the slippery slope. Who picks what is inappropriate, under what criteria, and how do you exempt that from being abused or usurped by those who would tamper with the distribution of information for political gain or empowerment over the public?

In Canada the government picks what to remove from charter protection.

The criteria for the validity of this removal is the Oakes test (external - login to view). It requires a rational connection between legislation and pressing social need, a demonstrably minimal impairment of the corresponding rights, and the third one I always forget... proportionality between objective and results.

There are various levels where accountability on the Oakes test is supposed to kick in. New legislation is supposed to pass charter review by the government in power. Then the courts generally begin to interpret it and put it through rigorous contextual tests. The validity of these safeguards can only by assured if the courts are independent of the government and not merely an extension of it.

For a good overview of the process, read through R. vs. Zundel (external - login to view), which was in relation to Zundel's publishing of "Did six million really die?" in Canada. Read also the cited cases to get a good overview for the workings of the courts on these issues, especially Irwin Toy, I also reccommend Dolphin Delivery.
 
Unforgiven
#22
Perhaps it is a very important time to pay attention to that legislation and monitor the subtle manipulation around it, if any, as a litmus test of the seated party's proximity to fascism.
 
warrior_won
#23
Quote: Originally Posted by The conductorView Post

Here is a list of banned books from different countries for different reasons.
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_banned_books (external - login to view)

This one caught my eye:

Karlsson-on-the-Roof (external - login to view) by Astrid Lindgren (external - login to view)

And why was this book banned in North America?

Banned for subversive views on babysitters!

I tell ya, babysitters either have a very powerful union, or they scraped their pennies together to hire one very influential lobbyist. Although, I must admit, I had no idea that there was such dissent regarding babysitters in America. Must be a grassroots kind of thing, huh?
 
Vereya
#24
Karlsson is banned in North America????
The poor North American kids... I am shocked....
I remember reading that book when I was a kid. It was really fascinating. And I remember trying to reconstruct Karlsson's roof-house under the kitchen table afterwards. I was about six years old at that time. And even now I take that book sometimes, when in a bad mood, and just look it through. (Without the kitchen table part recently, though). It is a great book, very funny and very kind. Any kid would enjoy it.
 
L Gilbert
#25
Kids can read these days?
 
RomSpaceKnight
#26
Quote: Originally Posted by LocutusView Post

Banning curriculum books or library books?

Wait until the social engineers start banning Huck Finn up here. Soon, everything will be nice and sterilized for your protection.

There are two versions of Huckleberry Finn. One is sanitized with all references to the "n" word removed. I can live with it. Kids may not realize that HF was written in a different time. Once they grow up they can discover the true classic story.
 
Vereya
#27
I don't like that idea, somehow. If we start re-writing classical books, suiting them to modern rules and principles, why read classical books at all? We can read modern books, that reflect the modern world, political correctness and all that. My point of view that classical books are to be read as they are. Their greatness (beside the literary value) lies in the way the author approached some issues that were crucial for his or her time. The author's approach and author's message singled the book out from many similar other books that were written in the same time. If we change a book to suit our modern conditions and standards, its uniqueness will ultimately be lost. Without getting the spirit of the time it was written, it will often be very hard, if not impossible, to see its value. And many books present a very accurate and fascinating description of ways and habits and traditions, practiced at certain times. Changing that will be madness.
 
Niflmir
#28
Quote: Originally Posted by warrior_wonView Post

This one caught my eye:

Karlsson-on-the-Roof (external - login to view) by Astrid Lindgren (external - login to view)

And why was this book banned in North America?

Banned for subversive views on babysitters!

I tell ya, babysitters either have a very powerful union, or they scraped their pennies together to hire one very influential lobbyist. Although, I must admit, I had no idea that there was such dissent regarding babysitters in America. Must be a grassroots kind of thing, huh?

I am able to buy that book from both Amazon.ca and Amazon.com. As always, be careful with wikipedia. That same article also claims that "Did six million really die?" is banned in Canada, when in fact I read the supreme court decision (external - login to view) and have linked it here before and they found the legislation unconstitutional.
 
Unforgiven
#29
Books V Content.

In North America, like other places, books aren't all that they used to be. I suspect that in the last ten years, reading has changed from books to online content in the amount that's being read. (Not sure if I said that right) I mean that more people read online than they do in books.

While in elementary school it's not difficult to control what kids get their hands on and their minds around, once they get into high school, it's a whole different ball game. So doesn't it become a matter of providing the guidance to help kids steer their way through the more difficult concepts and ideas as they grow old enough to start to understand them?

Question: If someone is going to get some information, does it matter who they get that information from, and is it important to have a responsible person who understands that information on hand to help with any questions that may arise?
 
karrie
#30
Quote: Originally Posted by UnforgivenView Post

Question: If someone is going to get some information, does it matter who they get that information from, and is it important to have a responsible person who understands that information on hand to help with any questions that may arise?

I'd say that changes from kid to kid Unf.
 

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