Ever had a change of career? What motivated you to do that?


SwitSof
#1
Ever decided to change course of career say from office work to research or say from IT to finance (changed to a different industry)? What made you come to that decision? What is the result so far?
 
tamarin
#2
Play to your strengths. A change in career is invigorating. And easier than you think.
 
Impetus
#3
Quote: Originally Posted by SwitSofView Post

Ever decided to change course of career say from office work to research or say from IT to finance (changed to a different industry)? What made you come to that decision? What is the result so far?

I've been a regular George Plimpton (external - login to view)...

Factory Worker (3 yrs) Right out of grade 10 into the working world. Made top dollars in a union factory job that I spent mostly on music equipment, partying, and women.
Left the high pay and security to become a $50/week....

Pro musician (15yrs) Played almost every small town in Ontario and toured across Canada too many times. One band had two gold records.
Left the fast lane in exchange for some roots. Tired of living out of a suitcase, and sometimes music can lose its appeal when it becomes your bread and butter.

Wheel Trans Driver (2 yrs) Interim "fall-back" career throughout my life. I could always get back in as a driver between musical tours. A very fulfilling job. Became unavailable to me when TTC picked up Wheel Trans and unionized the position.

Guitar Inspector/Shipper (Gibson guitars 2 yrs) A sweet job if I ever had one. Began the day smoking a joint with my boss in the parking lot over coffee, then began filling orders from music stores. Test and inspect each guitar and set up intonations before packing it on the skid. I always knew every song on the radio since I used it as my tuning standard. (I set up intonations by ear, to hell with tuners!)
Left that cushy yet low paying job to go back on the road (an offer I couldn't refuse)

Manufacturer of Heart-lung machine consumables (2 yrs) All the disposable tubing, filters, valves etc that are used to connect patients to heart-lung machines and dialysis machines. Pluse surgical kits for other procedures. I worked with six others in a "clean-room" facility.
Left that job to take a better paying job as an electrician's helper.

Industrial/Construction Electrician (15 years) I lucked out and got a job filling in for an electrician's apprentice while he went to school. They kept me on, started my own apprenticeship, and I eventually got my 309D Interprovincial license. Had my own contracting company for five years.
Had to stop doing electrical work due to severe tennis elbow (both) and resulting surgeries. By then the construction industry was in a slump and I had taken on a foreman position for a company doing lighting retrofit for schools. Fortunately, I got layed off after long enough to qualify for unemployment benefits and started a EI sponsored course on computer repair.

Computer Repair Technician (1 yr) Got an entry-level job right out of school working in the repair depot of a major computer company. Realized very quickly the real money is in sales and pre-sales consulting.
Computer Company Inside Sales rep (2 yrs) Made the big jump into sales when a position came open. My first ever suit-and-tie office job. Soon relaized there is more money with less stress as a presales engineer, so with my newfound sales acumen and technical background I quickly snapped up a position when it became available.

Infrastructure Analyst and Solution Architect (8 yrs) I found a niche specialty that was previously untapped, became an expert at it, and began selling my services to fortune 500 companies and government.

Next stop....retirement! I hope...unless there's yet another twist in my career path.

Sometimes I really miss the construction site...

Of course through this all, I've kept playing in various bands on the weekends to this day...

Muz
 
SwitSof
#4
Quote: Originally Posted by tamarinView Post

Play to your strengths.

How can you know of your strengths that work in a workplace? Cause sometimes some things that work outside work might not work outside the workplace and there are things you know after you do them yourself, isn't it?
 
Curiosity
#5
Traumatic personal event when I was 21 - changed my life - took me seven years to tie it all up and move to a new destination and a new destiny - and have never looked back. It was the right move.
 
Impetus
#6
Ironically, many of the things I learned as a pro musician have come to play in my current position.

Presentation and improvisational skills for one thing (OK, two things).
I can (and have) made ad hoc (as in unprepared) presentations to groups of two to two hundred, including government ministers, CEOs and CFOs.

I've applied the fundamentals of songwriting to my business writing. If you can say something with two or three words, why write a paragraph?

The fact I was never in an office job before gave me a fresh perspective to how people do things in the office. Old school "habits" applied to modern technology. (for example, people print their e-mails out and stack them on their desk "memo" style to deal with)

I do always get a tad bored at doing one thing for too long so it has to be evolving constantly. I've been "promoted" to manager of my consulting group so that's a new thing for me. A whole different set of meetings to attend, and I report directly to our CEO. Not bad result of a three-month entry-level contract after eleven years, if I do say so myself!

I think I read that people average three major careers over a lifetime, so don't worry about whether you're going into something you have to do for a lifetime. People re-invent themselves all the time.

If someone told me when I was young that I'd one day be able to sit out on my deck on a summer workday, wirelessly connected to the internet and all my work data and applications, do work that has profound effects on the way corporations and government do things, and take little "time-out" breaks to check out this place, I would have laughed and said you'll never see me in a tie.

Oh, speaking of ties, I don't have to wear one, but since I've been a manager no one seemed to treat me as one outside my own group until I started wearing one on a daily basis. There is truth to the saying "dress for success".

If there are some keys to success I've learned they are:
  • learn to write/speak/communicate intelligently
  • learn how to present yourself.(see above example)
  • get on committees at work or volunteer - you end up rubbing elbows with people at all levels who can help your career
  • think outside the box. Sometimes a lateral move opens up new possibilities.
  • Give of yourself. It all comes back to you.
Most important is to enjoy yourself every step along the way and take time out to congratulate yourself for what you've accomplished. Like Bon Jovi (ugh!) said "Welcome to wherever You Are"

Muz




Quote: Originally Posted by SwitSofView Post

How can you know of your strengths that work in a workplace? Cause sometimes some things that work outside work might not work outside the workplace and there are things you know after you do them yourself, isn't it?

 
Twila
#7
Muz, are you sure your name isn't Jack? as in Jack of all trades. sheesh your resume alone would be a small novel!

I went from hair stylist to administration.
 
SwitSof
#8
Quote: Originally Posted by CuriosityView Post

Traumatic personal event when I was 21 - changed my life - took me seven years to tie it all up and move to a new destination and a new destiny - and have never looked back. It was the right move.

Sorry to hear that and good to hear you're happy about the move.
You certainly don't have to tell us about the traumatic experience, but what was your career before and what is yours now if you don't mind sharing that?
 
SwitSof
#9
Quote: Originally Posted by ImpetusView Post

Infrastructure Analyst and Solution Architect (8 yrs) I found a niche specialty that was previously untapped, became an expert at it, and began selling my services to fortune 500 companies and government.

Next stop....retirement! I hope...unless there's yet another twist in my career path.

Wow, you've had such a colourful experience!
Well everybody would like to retire someday I suppose. When do you expect to retire? About 48 years of career after 10th grade, so that makes you in your 60s? I really didn't expect that! You do sound younger from the way you write, but then maybe I just don't have that good sense with age.
So the last and current title of being an architect is more in IT, isn't it?
 
Curiosity
#10
Switsof

I went from a playground supervisor to working full time on playgrounds and community centers right out of school. Loved it - although twenty years later I think it would be difficult to do now.....

I married young, was battered. I stayed with him because I was advised to continue the sanctity of marriage and was too stupid to tell anyone but the church and was afraid to tell my parents. I lost a child though the battering.

Took me a while to decide to save and go back to school - after moving to the U.S. I got my degree and I now have my own business. It was a fortunate move for me but would never have been done had I stayed in my first marriage.

I work with battered men and women as a volunteer now -
 
SwitSof
#11
Quote: Originally Posted by ImpetusView Post

I think I read that people average three major careers over a lifetime, so don't worry about whether you're going into something you have to do for a lifetime. People re-invent themselves all the time.

If someone told me when I was young that I'd one day be able to sit out on my deck on a summer workday, wirelessly connected to the internet and all my work data and applications, do work that has profound effects on the way corporations and government do things, and take little "time-out" breaks to check out this place, I would have laughed and said you'll never see me in a tie.

Oh, speaking of ties, I don't have to wear one, but since I've been a manager no one seemed to treat me as one outside my own group until I started wearing one on a daily basis. There is truth to the saying "dress for success".

If there are some keys to success I've learned they are:

  • learn to write/speak/communicate intelligently
  • learn how to present yourself.(see above example)
  • get on committees at work or volunteer - you end up rubbing elbows with people at all levels who can help your career
  • think outside the box. Sometimes a lateral move opens up new possibilities.
  • Give of yourself. It all comes back to you.

Somebody I know said that the risk in changing your career is that you have to go from the bottom of the ladder again and most likely get a lower pay too than before, which can be seen as a set-back and demotivating, isn't it?

Also one more thing that needs to be done especially in a corporate world perhaps. I suppose to learn to get along with people of different personalities and at least not to show you don't dislike the other person whom you have to work together with and meet everyday (every weekday at least), cause the two wouldn't be able to get the job done. Something I need to work on, cause I can't hide my emotions that well, they just show on my face a lot of times. At least the ones I don't like usually are indeed difficult people whom other(s) don't like either!
It's just amazing even how these difficult people can still climb up the ladder.
 
Impetus
#12
Heh, and the scars to prove it!

My job deals mainly with IT, but it's only part of aligning technology with business processes and vise versa. There are many facets to it, in how it is procured, managed, and how the costs are allocated to budgets within the organization.

I end up becoming the liaison between IT, the executive/board, facilities management, purchasing, and the people who use the technology.

I created the process and analytical tools I use and they've been dissected and pronounced sound by enough MBAs and CFOs to have some credibility.

And I thought my big contribution to mankind would be hit records....sigh...

Muz

Quote: Originally Posted by SwitSofView Post

Wow, you've had such a colourful experience!
Well everybody would like to retire someday I suppose. When do you expect to retire? About 48 years of career after 10th grade, so that makes you in your 60s? I really didn't expect that! You do sound younger from the way you write, but then maybe I just don't have that good sense with age.
So the last and current title of being an architect is more in IT, isn't it?

 
Nuggler
#13
Yes indeedy, they is good for the soul.

I gotta job rite outa skool, and worked at it for one day, when another job came up that I really wanted, so I got that job, and worked there for 3 years until it pissed me so completely off I might have 'gone postal' or at least 'courier service', so I quit it too. I went up North far enough so that the loons outnumbered the people, or the people were loonier, or whatever, and got a job and kept it for a couple years, then quit and started up a "forestry oriented company", sold it after a few years.........And............came back down south and gotta job and worked there for six years, and was gonna quit, but heard we wuz gettin laid off (not the good laid, the bad laid), but WTF I didn't like that job anyway so I hung around, took a layoff, (collected severence from this baby), and gotta nother job for 3 years, quit, gotta nother one for six months, quit, gotta another and stayed put for 29 years, then retired. Gotta pension, benefits, severance, kisses, hugs, cards, a party, an all from this little kitten. I ain't werked since eh.

Since I retired I did my first payin gig playin music................Want to be a millionaire playin music........no problem.........ya start with two million..............................So I quit playin for money, cause now, if I don't like the gig, I can tell em to shove it and move right along.

Yah, switch jobs a lot eh. Really a lot of fun.

Stay in schoool kids, I coulda LIVED in school, but I kicked me out.

I just got so quickly pissed with drivel drooling bullshyte artists - "team players" - Wound up a happy guy regardless.

 
triedit
#14
In my opinion, the key to success is loving what you do enough to get good at it.

DJ--Respiratory Therapist Assistant--DJ---Mom---DJ--Taxi dispatcher--Mom--Office Manager--accountant----Mom----Data input---Wendy's Hostess (long story)--DJ--Asst Head Cashier at a grocery store--DJ---Thrift Store and Food Bank Manager--Media and Marketing Consultant for the WV Forrestry Association--Mom--Genealogist--Paranormal Investigator--Adult Education Teacher--Author

All in 26 years. Oh and, believe it or not, I once was a church choir director and for a time was a Sunday School teacher. Ive also helped the Red Cross working in Naval Hospital. All of those were volunteer jobs though. I also maintain several websites as well as the master database for one family name. Ive also been a Girl Scout leader and the CFO for a charity.

What exactly is a career?
 
Unforgiven
#15
Yeah, health but then I caught on to the idea that I should be living simply and doing what I love doing and picking up a little pocket change along the way.
 
SwitSof
#16
Quote: Originally Posted by UnforgivenView Post

Yeah, health but then I caught on to the idea that I should be living simply and doing what I love doing and picking up a little pocket change along the way.

Health affected your decision in your career?
 
Vereya
#17
Quote: Originally Posted by CuriosityView Post

Switsof

Took me a while to decide to save and go back to school - after moving to the U.S. I got my degree and I now have my own business. It was a fortunate move for me but would never have been done had I stayed in my first marriage.

I work with battered men and women as a volunteer now -

Curiosity, you are just great! So strong and courageous!
You have my admiration and respect!
 
Vereya
#18
I had several changes of career. I started as a teacher of English, and to tell you the truth, I never really liked teaching. I tried to do my best, but it was too monotonous and routine for me. Teaching is really not my cup of tea. Besides, teachers in Russia are paid very little, so I had to have three jobs just to make the ends meet. So, when I was offered the job of a secretary with a bigger salary than what I was making in those three jobs, I went for it. I worked as a secretary for four years, it was kind of fun for awhile. I got to learn a lot of new things, got to know how business is done in my country, saw a lot of things happening and learned a lot on that job, in fact.
And for the last two years I am working as a technical writer in a software development company, and right now it seems to me that I have finally found the right kind of job. I simply love it! It is so interesting and exciting. The challenge, the development, the growth are all there. Especially the challenge! I don't know computers that well, actually - I am a good user, but no more. So I have to learn a lot fo new things to do my work well, and I really like learning new things. I have to do some software testing as well, and that's a lot of fun. For instance, yesterday I broke the software I was testing so thouroughly, that it took our developers who had written it a whole day to make it work again That's what my boss calls a talented software tester!
 
SwitSof
#19
Quote: Originally Posted by CuriosityView Post

I married young, was battered. I stayed with him because I was advised to continue the sanctity of marriage and was too stupid to tell anyone but the church and was afraid to tell my parents. I lost a child though the battering.

Took me a while to decide to save and go back to school - after moving to the U.S. I got my degree and I now have my own business. It was a fortunate move for me but would never have been done had I stayed in my first marriage.

I work with battered men and women as a volunteer now -

That was very courageous of you. My best friend was starting to volunteer and doing research with battered women in Japan cause her major at that time was sociology and anthropology-related and she couldn't continue cause she didn't have the heart. So what she told me she by then could understand how strong these women must be to take the decision to leave things behind cause there are some who couldn't.
And now you're sharing your experience with others so that's very good of you. Bon courage!
 
Unforgiven
#20
Quote: Originally Posted by SwitSofView Post

Health affected your decision in your career?

Oh yeah, I've got an eating disorder, and asthma. Chained to a desk for years didn't help that at all. So I took sabbatical to see if I could get that under control and found that going back to intranet systems security was counter productive to the changes in my lifestyle. So with the help of a financial planner I found I could get my investments earning money, trim off the low yield earners and spend time working on my wife's art portfolio.

I've also returned to school of sorts as I want to captain our own large boat. So I've been taking courses on the many aspects of owning and piloting a boat locally and in international waters. More work on systems this winter.
 
SwitSof
#21
Quote: Originally Posted by UnforgivenView Post

I've also returned to school of sorts as I want to captain our own large boat. So I've been taking courses on the many aspects of owning and piloting a boat locally and in international waters. More work on systems this winter.

What about having a self-sufficient boat? You can use solar cells for the power and hot water I suppose?
 
Unforgiven
#22
Quote: Originally Posted by SwitSofView Post

What about having a self-sufficient boat? You can use solar cells for the power and hot water I suppose?

Yes there are many new possibilities as technology applies to systems. I read about a very smart and simple system for fresh water. Most larger trawlers and cruisers have a hardtop of some sort. A larger hardtop with a lip around the edge can collect a substantial amount of water from rainfall if it's set up right.

So this couple had on their 42 foot boat, 4, 150 gallon stainless steel water tanks built in to the boat. When it rained, four drains on the hardtop allowed for rainwater to be directed to the tanks or over the side should the tanks be full by four hoses. They cruised Australia through Indonesia via the Java Sea and into the South China Sea and up to Thailand. Not even remotely short of fresh water. That's with a couple of showers a day each and the usual fresh water needs. They even helped others out with freshwater who didn't have the storage on their own boats.

A very simple system, that doesn't breakdown and works above expectations.

In the news, a solar powered catamaran just made port in Florida that crossed the Atlantic on solar power alone. At an average of 5 knots an hour, it made it from Spain to the Caribbean and then on to Florida and the only petrol it used was for cooking. No sails, no gas motor just electricity made from sunshine.

This is something I would like to incorporate into my boat. Though with complex systems comes more opportunity for something to breakdown.
 
sanctus
#23
I had a change of career, and it has been so many different things for me, fulfilling, demanding and sometimes puzzling.

I really did not have much of a choice, as it were. In fact, I fought against the inward tug of God for years until I finally gave in and did His will.

In doing so, I have discovered my true purpose in being on this planet.
 
Curiosity
#24
Quote: Originally Posted by SwitSofView Post

That was very courageous of you. My best friend was starting to volunteer and doing research with battered women in Japan cause her major at that time was sociology and anthropology-related and she couldn't continue cause she didn't have the heart. So what she told me she by then could understand how strong these women must be to take the decision to leave things behind cause there are some who couldn't.
And now you're sharing your experience with others so that's very good of you. Bon courage!

SwitSof Thank you... This is a really interesting topic - makes for a good read and I love to see what other people are finding in the way of life goals which give them satisfaction.

I wanted to tell you there are many males who have experienced battering - the word got out about my group and the men just started showing up - first one - then three - and now we have had seven although some only come sporadically - nobody was more shocked that men are battered as well - and have few resources to get help - plus the societal restrictions on them retaliating against their batterers - who are considered fragile in comparison.

It is difficult to absorb the cruelty and passion involved in this behavior - especially when it is mixed with love or adoration - and often leaves me wondering how people connect in the first place.
 

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